Category: Networking

Networking with Alumni

The Lawrence alumni network is one of the university’s greatest assets. Unfortunately, it also seems to be one of the best-kept secrets. I say “unfortunately” because it shouldn’t be a secret! We have alumni in almost any field and location you can think of. This provides an amazing resource for current students who would like to learn more about a specific industry or hear how past LU students have used their liberal arts degree.

Okay, you might be thinking, I agree having an active alumni network is great, but how do I get in touch with alumni that are doing something I’m interested in?

There are two primary ways of getting in touch with alumni: reaching out via email, or meeting face-to-face at an alumni networking reception or similar event hosted by Lawrence.

Here are some tips that will help make your alumni interactions successful in each situation:

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Reasons to Spend More Time on LinkedIn and Less on Facebook

These days, chances are you’re spending more time stalking on Facebook than thinking about the future. But, if you want to prepare for life after Lawrence (and you should), it’s a good idea to start devoting some of your time to more fruitful pursuits. Below are some reasons why LinkedIn beats Facebook in helping you further your career. (Plus, click on the infographic to the left for some interesting stats.)

(Read full article and more tips here.)

1. LinkedIn is a professional website. LinkedIn was created to connect professionals in online networking; Facebook was not. Although both services have evolved to include elements of each other, they do still remain true to their original purpose, and LinkedIn excels at presenting a professional front.

2. Your college professors might actually use LinkedIn. Although some colleges take a lax approach to social media, many still frown on Facebook connections between students and professors. But on LinkedIn, connections are typically seen as a positive thing, opening you up to the resources that your professors can share with you, including positive recommendations.

3. LinkedIn users log in with a purpose. While on Facebook, you may be surfing to find out about the latest cat video or your friend’s wedding photos, but LinkedIn tends to lead to a more task-driven visit. Users log in to check out job and collaboration opportunities, people to hire, and relevant industry news.

4. You’re more likely to get a recommendation on LinkedIn. A recommendation on either LinkedIn or Facebook is a great way to put your best foot forward, but you’re simply more likely to land one on LinkedIn. Recent stats show that 36% of LinkedIn users make a recommendation, compared to 27% of Facebook users. LinkedIn also has a 57% interested recommendation response, compared with 42% on Facebook (see more stats and source here.)

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How to Master Your Skype or Phone Interview

When living within the Lawrence Bubble, it can be difficult to get away from campus for interviews. If you can’t meet someone face-to-face, interviewing via Skype or phone may be your best option. Here are some tips to help you ace these interviews.

General Phone & Skype Tips

  • Be succinct. It’s hard to pick up on non-verbal cues in these situations. Don’t babble and stop yourself when you’ve answered the question completely.
  • Get rid of distractions. Make sure that you’re in a secure, quiet place where you won’t be interrupted. Lock your door or put a sign on the outside to let your roommates know you are not to bothered during that time.
  • Don’t sound sleepy. Wake up an hour before your interview. People can tell if you just woke up and it sounds unprofessional. Call a friend and talk for a few minutes to get your voice ready.

Skype Interviews

  • Avoid technical difficulties. Double – no, triple check your Internet connection before your interview begins. Make sure that your speakers and microphone work. Call a friend on Skype and do a sound and picture check.
  • Know proper web cam etiquette. Look at the camera and not the screen so that you are making eye contact. Sit up straight. Don’t sit too close to the camera. Use the camera to check out what you look like on screen before the call so you know how they’ll view you.

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10 Smart Ways to Use Social Media in Your Job Search

Social media has never been so vital to job hunters. But using social media like Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn for job search takes a few more tricks than keeping profiles and personal updates. Here is an abstract from a slideshow by Alexis Grant from U.S. News Money and Career. See original slideshow here.

1. Let people know that you are looking. Tweet or update your status when you have published your resume.

2. Don’t be afraid to network on Facebook. Friends are usually more willing to help.

3. Make sure your Facebook profile is private. You may not want employers to see your personal updates.

4. Find information about hiring managers. Knowing them helps you customize your resume and cover letter.

5. Hyperlink your resume. Add the URL for your LinkedIn and Twitter profiles to your contact information on the resume.

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Recruiter Pet Peeves

Original article by Lindsay Pollak can be found here.

It’s that time of year again: students are busy applying for jobs and internships that will be waiting for them once school lets out. While it’s very important you take the right steps during the application process, there are also some things you should avoid doing in order to increase your chances of getting the position you want. Below are a few pet peeves expressed by recruiters about entry-level candidates.

1. Not doing your homework. There really is no excuse for not learning as much information about a company as possible before meeting a representative at a job fair, information session, or other recruiting event. Simply visit their website or do a quick Google search. Asking a recruiter a general question about what the company does is a quick way to fall off their list.

2. “Just following up.” There is a fine line between appropriate persistence and pointless pestering. It is absolutely fine to call or email a recruiter to say thank you for a company information session, to ask a few questions, or to mention that you’ll be attending another event they are hosting. But “Just calling to follow up!” doesn’t add much to your candidacy.

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Searching for a Job: Career and Job Fairs

This post was written by Career Assistant Brynley Nadziejka,  ’14.

As we enter the New Year, seniors especially will start thinking about what they will do after graduation, and for a lot of them that will include finding a job. Searching for employment is a daunting process, but career and job fairs exist to make things a little easier. These fairs give you a chance to meet face-to-face with representatives from dozens of hiring companies in only one or two hours. You provide them with a resume and short, 30-second “marketing pitch” about your qualifications (i.e. educational history, applicable skills, and previous experience).

To help you search for fairs, listed below are links to the websites of ten job or career fair companies that host dozens of fairs nationwide over the course of the year:

http://www.careermd.com/default.aspx

http://www.carouselexpo.com/

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