Category: Recruiters

Site Review: graduate-jobs.com

What the site says about itself:

“graduate-jobs.com is NOT a recruitment agency, we are a specialist graduate job board. According to High Fliers Research (2007) graduate-jobs.com is the biggest independent graduate job board in the UK. We allow small and large organisations in the UK to post graduate job advertisements and search CVs in a quick and cost effective way. All our services are available online once you have created (or are issued with) a username and password.

The concept is simple: to deliver graduates the best selection of graduate-jobs on the Internet, and to provide recruiters with the most cost effective, focused access to graduate jobseekers.”

The Pros

– You provide them with information about “Industry sectors you would like to work in” and “Career keywords” when you sign up, so they can create a list of opportunities that are relevant to your interests and experiences

– According the site, “over 3,665 recruiters” use this site

– You can search the site for jobs by location, employer, immediate start, sector, degree, industry

– You can upload a CV (resume) document so recruiters can “head hunt” you

– Provides a section of “graduate advice” guide to “assist you in formulating a plan for finding you your graduate job”

– This site is designed for people who want to work in the UK

The Cons

– This site is designed for people who want to work in the UK (and primarily for people who are also from the UK) – so it may not be for you.

– Clearly geared toward students in the UK, as all others select “Non-EU university” when making personal profile.

– Also, enter “Degree result” with the options of “Bachelors Pass,” “Bachelors 2:2,” “Bachelors 2:1,” “Bachelors 1st,” which probably doesn’t mean much to U.S. students

Final Thoughts:

If you’re specifically looking for an entry-level job in the UK, graduate-jobs.com seems like a great resource. If you’re not interested in relocating, this site it almost definitely not for you. However, you may want to check it out just to see what’s out there for people with similar interests and experience as you.

Have you used graduate-jobs.com? What did you think? Let us know!

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FTC Disclaimer: A review of the site was requested via email. We were not paid and did not receive any compensation to conduct this review.

 

Employers and Social Media

You may have seen the recent Associated Press article about employers asking for job candidates’ Facebook usernames and passwords (if not, you can read it here). According to the article, employers are taking the process of vetting job applicants one step further than just checking out their online profiles and now may want to be able to look at candidates’ accounts from the inside.

Facebook responded to this article by posting a note explaining that the practice of sharing or soliciting profile passwords is a violation of Facebook’s Statement of Rights and Responsibilities, and that they do not think asking prospective employees to provide their passwords “is the right thing to do” (see the note here).

But isn’t the information on social networking sites fair game to employers? Not at all, according to many groups, including government officials and the ACLU, who have responded to the news of this practice with outrage. They say that using this information is a violation of applicants’ privacy and that asking for it during the application process may be coercive.

Continue reading Employers and Social Media

Recruiter Pet Peeves

Original article by Lindsay Pollak can be found here.

It’s that time of year again: students are busy applying for jobs and internships that will be waiting for them once school lets out. While it’s very important you take the right steps during the application process, there are also some things you should avoid doing in order to increase your chances of getting the position you want. Below are a few pet peeves expressed by recruiters about entry-level candidates.

1. Not doing your homework. There really is no excuse for not learning as much information about a company as possible before meeting a representative at a job fair, information session, or other recruiting event. Simply visit their website or do a quick Google search. Asking a recruiter a general question about what the company does is a quick way to fall off their list.

2. “Just following up.” There is a fine line between appropriate persistence and pointless pestering. It is absolutely fine to call or email a recruiter to say thank you for a company information session, to ask a few questions, or to mention that you’ll be attending another event they are hosting. But “Just calling to follow up!” doesn’t add much to your candidacy.

Continue reading Recruiter Pet Peeves

Ask the Experts: How important is written communication?

Question: Students are frequently told that written communication is vital in the world of work. How important, really, is a candidate’s ability to write well?

Answer: In my opinion, writing well is definitely vital. It’s only apparent, however, when you don’t write well. People tend not to notice or comment when an email, document, or other form of written communication is written well. However, they immediately notice, and think less of someone that writes poorly. When they see poor grammar, mis-spellings, unprofessional wording, slang, or worse… texting abbreviations, it creates an impression, right or wrong, that the person is under educated, careless, or unserious about their job. Poor writing can definitely be a CLA (Career Limiting Activity).


About this expert: Harry Urschel has over 25 years experience as a technology recruiter in Minnesota. He currently operates as e-Executives, writes a blog for Job Seekers called The Wise Job Search, and can be found on Twitter as @eExecutives.

Learn More About LUworks

Have you created your LUworks profile yet?

Created with you in mind, LUworks will help you find a job or internship by enabling you to:

  • Manage multiple resumes, cover letters, and other employment related documents
  • Search for and apply for employment opportunities online
  • View and RSVP for career events
  • Maintain an online Personal Calendar

For easy access to the website, click the picture to the left and then the “LUworks Student/Alum Login” logo.

Questions? Please contact Career Services at (920) 832-6561 or email careercenter@lawrence.edu.

Newberry Library Internships

NOTE: summer deadline February 21st
The Newberry Library offers internships in most of its departments.   Newberry interns benefit professionally and intellectually from challenging work assignments as well as participation in the Library’s lively community of scholars.  Interns are supervised individually by Newberry staff members, who serve as mentors and insure that the internship has a robust educational component.  In addition to their individual assignments, interns learn about other dimensions of the Library through group presentations, tours, and events such as the weekly colloquium. (At the colloquium, the Newberry community gathers to hear an informal talk, usually focused on the collections or a current research project within the Library, followed by discussion and accompanied by refreshments.)

Internships may last from one month to one year, and require from seven to thirty-five hours per week.  In most cases hours can be arranged flexibly.  Although these opportunities are unpaid (unless stated otherwise), many previous interns have earned academic credit for their Newberry experience.  Undergraduates and graduate students in the humanities, social sciences, library and information science, performing arts, journalism, communications, marketing, graphic design, and museum studies, as well as postgraduates with backgrounds in these fields, may apply for available internships.  Please refer to the individual internship descriptions for the specific qualifications for each position.  For more information, please go to http://www.newberry.org/hr/jobscontent.html#General%20Intern%20Info and/or see the attached document.

Newberry Library Internship Notice Form

Please contact Tricia Plutz, the Internship Coordinator, in the Career Center if you have any questions. If you secure this internship or any other internship, please contact the Career Center so we can register it on your co-curricular transcript and provide you with support.