Tag: job hunt

Job and Internship Application Tips

Life after Lawrence can be scary, whether we’re talking about after graduation or just following Spring Term. Below is some advice to help you secure a position that you’re happy with once you leave campus.

Set goals. No, I don’t just mean the obvious goal of getting job. When you’re searching for a position it’s important to have quantifiable, defined goals so you can stay on the right track. This may mean that you want to check a certain number job-posting websites per day or send out so many resumes to employers per week. Taking these steps and keeping track of what you’ve done can also help keep you from feeling discouraged.

Pay attention to quality over quantity. While it’s important to get your resume out to a fair number of prospective employers, remember that it is also vital to send documents that you’re proud of – as these are the first introduction to you that employers will get. This means that should tweak your resume and cover letter a little bit so that they are relevant to each position for which you apply.

Follow up with employers you’ve contacted. Once you’ve updated your documents and sent them out, be sure to follow up on them a week or two later if you haven’t heard much in response. Doing so can show employers that you really are interested in the position you applied for and can keep you on their radar if your resume was accidently pushed to the bottom of the stack.

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Tips for Finding Summer Jobs and Internships

Though many students look forward to getting a break from school during the summer, those ten weeks aren’t necessarily just for relaxing. In fact, the summer can be a great time to gain experience in your field of interest and to make some money to help pay for expenses during the school year. Because the summer can offer so many great opportunities to further your education outside the classroom, it may seem imperative to land that “perfect” summer job or internship in order to get what you need from your college experience. This may make the prospect of filling the summer with something productive (and maybe even fun) daunting for some, especially when you’re supposed to do so while dealing with the stress of school work.

Well, fear not – below are some tips compiled from various sources for college students who may want great summer jobs but don’t know where to start looking.

1. Visit Career Services. Yes, of course, I had to start with this one – but that’s only because the folks at Career Services can offer you a ton of support while you’re finding, applying to, and carrying out your summer job or internship. Attend sessions of the “Internship 101” and “Resume and Cover Letter Writing” seminars so you can get the skills you need to begin applying. And, as always, you can make appointments to see Career Advisors or Career Assistants and come in during Drop In Hours whenever you have questions. Check out LUworks for more info.

2. Tap Your Network. They say it’s not what you do but who you know that gets you ahead. Personally, I’d like to think it’s a little bit of both – but there’s no denying that one of the best ways to find job opportunities is by talking with people you know. Start with your family, friends, professors, and contacts in the field you’re interested in. If you’ve already got something in mind, tell them. They may have suggestions and know people you can contact for more information.

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Career Fair Tips

Career fairs are a great way to search for jobs and make connections with employers and companies, but walking into a convention room filled with dozens of company representatives can be intimidating and a little baffling. To make the most of your time at a job fair, it is important to know what to do before you arrive and how you should interact with the company representatives during the fair.

Listed below are some tips to help make your time at job fairs as productive as possible.

Before the Fair:

  1. Do your homework! Being able to ask informed questions shows the representatives that you are genuinely interested in their company.
  2. Prepare a 30-60 second marketing pitch that highlights your educational history, relevant experiences and some skills specific to the industry you are looking into. Make the most of your face-to-face time with representatives because it will be limited.
  3. Prepare to bring 20-25 crisp resumes.

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Recruiter Pet Peeves

Original article by Lindsay Pollak can be found here.

It’s that time of year again: students are busy applying for jobs and internships that will be waiting for them once school lets out. While it’s very important you take the right steps during the application process, there are also some things you should avoid doing in order to increase your chances of getting the position you want. Below are a few pet peeves expressed by recruiters about entry-level candidates.

1. Not doing your homework. There really is no excuse for not learning as much information about a company as possible before meeting a representative at a job fair, information session, or other recruiting event. Simply visit their website or do a quick Google search. Asking a recruiter a general question about what the company does is a quick way to fall off their list.

2. “Just following up.” There is a fine line between appropriate persistence and pointless pestering. It is absolutely fine to call or email a recruiter to say thank you for a company information session, to ask a few questions, or to mention that you’ll be attending another event they are hosting. But “Just calling to follow up!” doesn’t add much to your candidacy.

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Searching for a Job: Career and Job Fairs

This post was written by Career Assistant Brynley Nadziejka,  ’14.

As we enter the New Year, seniors especially will start thinking about what they will do after graduation, and for a lot of them that will include finding a job. Searching for employment is a daunting process, but career and job fairs exist to make things a little easier. These fairs give you a chance to meet face-to-face with representatives from dozens of hiring companies in only one or two hours. You provide them with a resume and short, 30-second “marketing pitch” about your qualifications (i.e. educational history, applicable skills, and previous experience).

To help you search for fairs, listed below are links to the websites of ten job or career fair companies that host dozens of fairs nationwide over the course of the year:

http://www.careermd.com/default.aspx

http://www.carouselexpo.com/

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How to Prepare for the Job Market NOW

The Wall Street Journal recently published an article providing ten steps college students should be taking to prepare for the job market while still in school.

This is an article summary. The original article can be read here.

The ten pieces of advice are:

1. Start looking for a job early now, while you’re still in school.

2. Network with professionals while in college. Alumni are a great resource.

3. While is college, work part-time or take an internship. It’s very important to gain experience.

4. Get involved with career-related clubs and activities.

5. Apply for many jobs, but make sure you’re qualified for them.

6. Be professional while in still school. This means do things like dress well, create a LinkedIn account, clean up your online presence, and make business cards.

7. Set career goals. They can always change (and probably will), but think about specific goals and how you will achieve them.

8. Go to the college career center. It’s never too early or too late to make an appointment.

9. Keep track of your achievements and activities. Doing so in a public setting (like LinkedIn lets other people know what you’ve done.

10. Develop relevant skills. Having an awareness of industry-specific skills as well as broad, transferable ones is a way to really stand out.