Tag: job skills

Transferable Resume Skills

Summer is coming, and students are searching and applying for internships and jobs. This is also the time that many students realize they need a resume! Drafting a resume for the first time can be frustrating if, like a lot of students, you do not have much related job experience. Do not despair! Here is a little known fact: the skills you gain outside of class can often be included on your resume.

When you’re thinking about what you have to offer a company, keep in mind what you have done in your extracurricular activities. Here are some skills that you may not have realized you have or didn’t think were worth mentioning:

Leadership:

  • One quality that employers are always looking for is leadership potential.
  • Clubs and organizations on campus are wonderful opportunities to gain leadership experience before you graduate.
  • If you have held an officer or manager position in student government, Greek life, sports teams, or any organization on campus, you have experience leading a group of your peers.
  • You can offer them not just leadership potential but leadership experience.

Teamwork:

  • Being a part of a sports team or other student group requires that you learn to work with the people around you.
  • Whether you are planning a fundraising event, strategizing for the game next Friday, or designing the set for a performance, you have to be able to communicate effectively and know when to compromise.
  • Being able to successfully work as part of a team is invaluable in the work place.

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Salary Negotiations: The Initial Offer and Your Response

When negotiating salary or other benefit, you are also negotiating the foundation of a relationship, so you want to get off on the right foot. You and the employer must come to an agreement that you both feel is fair. Here are some tips and rules to keep in mind when talking about salaries and benefits.

The following are the best steps to take when negotiation begins:
1. Do not negotiate until you have an offer in writing. Let the employer go first with the offer. However, if they ask you first, tell them your salary range (that you determined with the Considerations in this handout).
2. Restate their offer, and then process it. Keep an honest yet non-emotional response (including body language) based on your research. So, if it is less than you expect, indicate that it is lower than you expected per your research. Be prepared to verify the sources of your research.
3. Counteroffer with your research-based response and desired range. Remain objective, optimistic, and polite.
4. Never accept an offer right then and there. Ask when they need to know your decision. A respectable company does not ask you to respond immediately.

If you have multiple job offers, you can sharpen your negotiation skills. Practice with a company you are indifferent about working for. If you are feeling confident, try for the company with the best offer. Remember, if they are negotiating, then you are the leading candidate. Use this power to your advantage.

Sources: Sweet Careers Consulting, MJW Careers

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Positive Job Outlook for Graduating Seniors

According to The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) research report “Job Outlook 2011”, the prospects for college graduates looking for a job have improved. The organizations who responded to the survey reported that they plan to hire 13.5% more workers with bachelor’s degrees from the Class of 2011 than they did from the Class of 2010. Continue reading Positive Job Outlook for Graduating Seniors

Summer Prep: Get Ready for Internship and Employment Opportunities

Summer Prep: Get Ready for Internship and Employment Opportunities

If you find yourself cut off from campus resources, unemployed, or just plain bored this summer, you may feel as if there is nothing you can do to help increase your chances of getting that ideal job or internship in the future. In reality, the summer is a great time to start getting materials together and for making sure you are well prepared when job or internship opportunities present themselves. Here are a few tips to help you get ready for the application process:

– Identify your current educational and professional goals. Doing this can help you determine what you hope to get from an internship or job, and may help to guide your search for positions in the future.

– Get working on your résumé. Check out the Career Center’s website at http://www.lawrence.edu/dept/student_dean/career/resume/ for written information and watch the video at http://www.lawrence.edu/dept/student_dean/career/video/pages/resume_video.shtml. And, even if you are not sure about how to perfectly format a résumé or what exactly to include, creating of list of your experiences and what you learned from each can be extremely useful when you put together a more formal version of your résumé in the future. Continue reading Summer Prep: Get Ready for Internship and Employment Opportunities

Diversity In the Workplace

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With an average of 11% of the Lawrence University population being international, as well as 112 off campus programs (102 of which are study abroad), diversity is not hard to find on campus. Compare this number to Knox College’s 6.8% and you can see that not every student in higher education gets the same exposure to diversity as Lawrentians. This diversity is not only a large drawing point for schools, it also comes into play as a significant antagonist within the workplace; many people consider diversity an issue, some sort of statistic to deal with or an egg-shell topic that should be pushed aside to avoid conflict. Instead of hiding such an important issue away, it should be faced and both the advantages and issues placed upon the table. Many employers and businesses are starting to do just that.

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Recession Proof YOURSELF

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In times such as these, it is temping to look to jobs that are deemed to be “recession proof.” This idea is catered to by the media and reinforced by the fear of unemployment. It is understandable but dangerous. While there are jobs that are not reliant on the spending ability of others, and therefore less susceptible to economic downturn, it is important not to shape your career aspirations around the “hot fields” of the time. That strategy tends to have the same success rate as fad dieting.

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