Year: 2011

Tim Troy’s “The Life of Me” Gets Reading at Minneapolis Theatre

The latest playwriting project of Tim Troy, professor of theatre arts at Lawrence University, “The Life of Me,” will be performed Monday, Dec. 19 at the Playwrights Center in Minneapolis, Minn., as part of the company’s Members Stage Reading series.  The reading, at 6:30 p.m., is free and open to the public.

Professor of Theatre Arts Tim Troy

The reading, which explores many of the cultural and political conflicts that marked the period from 2003-05, features Katie Hawkinson ’09 in the role of Julie and veteran Milwaukee area actor Jacque Troy in the lead role of Kate, along with some of the Twin Cities best actors. An earlier version of the play was presented at Lawrence in the spring of 2006.

A parent’s capricious demand to inflate her son’s grade threatens Kate’s career. Surrounded by eclectic siblings who’ve conspired to reconcile an on-going family crisis, Kate desperately seeks renewed stability in her personal and professional relationships. She turns to art, literature and religion to lead her past doubt, learning that even a middle school teacher is vulnerable to those who will use faith as a weapon.

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

Earthquake Relief Funds Heading to Haiti for Music School Reconstruction

Almost two years after a devastating earthquake leveled much of the island nation of Haiti, Lawrence University’s campaign to help rebuild the Holy Trinity Music School in Port-au-Prince is taking shape.

The school, a long-time destination for Lawrence student and faculty volunteers, was destroyed by the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed more than 200,000 Haitians. Nine days later, Lawrence hosted the “Concert for Haiti” which was recorded by Fox-11 WLUK and rebroadcast several times across Northeast Wisconsin.

The concert raised $32,000 through donations from the community and a recent gift from the Episcopal Diocese of Fond du Lac pushed the overall total to more than $40,000. The funds are now being sent to Haiti to begin reconstruction efforts.

Tom Clowes '01 is one of numerous alumni who have traveled to Haiti to work with young music students there.

“Weeks after the earthquake, musicians from Holy Trinity began performing for displaced people living in makeshift tent cities. With this donation the music school will build a temporary rehearsal structure enabling work to go on even in inclement weather,” said Lawrence Professor of Cello Janet Anthony, who has traveled to Haiti annually to teach music. “Plans have been drawn up to rebuild the entire cathedral complex (cathedral, convent, elementary, trade and music schools, art museum, concert hall, administrative offices, guest house) but, even with the most optimistic estimates, the completion date is several years off. This donation marks the first large step in the process of rebuilding and is hugely important. The generosity of our local community is astounding, moving and extremely gratifying.”

The funds raised, with generous support from Fox-11 WLUK, the Episcopal Diocese of Fond du Lac, the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region, the American Red Cross and the Northeast Wisconsin community, are being used to build a temporary shelter in downtown Port-au-Prince that will house two rehearsal halls, a studio and an instrument depot, as well as office space at the school’s annex in nearby Petionville.

“This was a wonderful example of our community pulling together to collaborate for an important cause,” said Lawrence President Jill Beck. “Lawrence could not have done this alone. We are so grateful to our many community partners, especially to the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region for stewarding the donated funds and to the Episcopal Diocese of Fond du Lac for raising additional funds and coordinating with the diocese in Haiti to ensure the money is safely transferred to the school.”

Since 1996, Lawrence students and faculty have traveled to Haiti to teach at various music programs. The Holy Trinity Music School began in 1963 and slowly became one of the only institutions in Haiti to integrate children from all economic levels. At the time of the earthquake, more than 1,200 students attended the school with its five orchestras, three bands and the renowned Petits Chanteurs. Over the years, the music school has gained international acclaim, touring the United States several times.

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

 

Saxophonist Phillip Dobernig ’13 Earns Second Place Honors in Music Competition

Lawrence University junior Phillip Dobernig earned second-place honors Nov. 26 in the Civic Music Association of Milwaukee Collegiate Music Competition, which was conducted at the Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the Arts in Brookfield.

Saxophonist Phillip Dobernig '13

A saxophone performance and music education major from Mukwonago, Dobernig was one of six musicians selected as finalists for the competition. He received a $1,500 scholarship for his performance, which included the pieces “Brilliance” by Ida Gotkovsky and “Tableaux de Provence” by Paule Maurice.  He is a student of Professor of Music Steven Jordheim.

Dobernig is a member of the Lawrence University saxophone quartet that won the 2011 Neale-Silva Young Artists competition sponsored by Wisconsin Public Radio and the 2010 Lawrence Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition.

The Civic Music Association of Milwaukee Collegiate Music Competition is open to continuing college students — instrumentalists and vocalists — who either graduated from a Milwaukee area high school or who currently attend a Milwaukee area college.

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

 

Lawrence Anthropologist Elected Fellow of Prestigious Science Organization

Lawrence University Professor of Anthropology Peter Peregrine has been elected a Fellow of the prestigious American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Election as an AAAS Fellow recognizes “meritorious efforts to advance science or its applications” and is an honor bestowed on AAAS members by their peers.  Peregrine was cited for his “research and theoretical contributions to American and Old World archaeology.”

Peregrine is just the second Lawrence anthropologist elected an AAAS Fellow, joining professor emeritus Ron Mason, who taught at Lawrence from 1961-95.

Peter Peregrine

“This is an amazing honor. I see it as the second highest honor an anthropologist can receive, right behind election to the National Academy of Sciences,” said Peregrine. The people who elected me are the most respected scholars in my discipline and the fact they think enough of my work to have me join them as a Fellow is both humbling and inspiring.”

The AAAS has approximately 125,000 individual members and only about 500 are elected Fellows each year.

“We are pleased that Professor Peregrine has been recognized with this honor,” said Provost David Burrows. “He is a creative, intelligent scholar, a fine teacher and a great contributor to the science of anthropology.”

An archaeologist, Peregrine joined the Lawrence faculty in 1995 after spending five years in the anthropology department of Juniata College in Pennsylvania.

Specializing in the evolution of complex societies, Peregrine’s scholarship interests include how ancient people first came to live together in large communities with powerful political leaders and how people from different cultures and speaking different languages interact and sometimes merge.

He is the author of the book “Archaeology of the Mississippian Culture:  A Research Guide” and co-edited the book “Ancient Human Migrations.”

He earned his bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees from Purdue University.

Founded in 1848, the AAAS is an international organization dedicated to advancing science around the world and serves more than 260 affiliated societies and academies of science and 10 million individuals. Its flagship publication, Science, has the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general science journal in the world.

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

$5 Million Gift Helps Launch Lawrence Film Studies Center

A game-changer for Lawrence University.

President Jill Beck announced a $5 million gift from Lawrence graduates Tom and Julie Hurvis that will support the establishment of The Hurvis Center for Interdisciplinary Film Studies, a facility dedicated to the integration of film production into the Lawrence curriculum.

The $5 million gift from the Hurvis Charitable Foundation was a part of Lawrence’s recently concluded “More Light!” campaign that raised more than $160 million.

Julie '61 and Tom Hurvis '60

The opening of the Hurvis Center will expand the scope of Lawrence’s current film curriculum, physically and intellectually.  The program currently includes interdisciplinary courses on film theory, history and analysis. The gift will create a fully functional film production studio supporting students’ creation of film and video for artistic and scholarly expression.

Beginning with its signature course, Freshman Studies, Lawrence provides a rigorous education in the traditional forms of literacy — cogent writing and oral dialogue. The enhanced film program will complement those traditions by engaging students in a third form of literacy essential for the 21st century: the visual literacy of film and video.

“Students already learn to ‘read’ film through our existing film theory and history curriculum,” said Beck. “The expanded program made possible by Tom and Julie Hurvis will enable students to learn to ‘write’ as well, producing original documentaries and creative films to express ideas, to raise awareness about issues of concern, and to share research with scholarly and community audiences.

“We are fortunate that an imaginative interdisciplinary approach to film studies has evolved and grown at Lawrence over the past many years,” Beck added. “The Hurvis gift recognizes that fact and generously provides us with the opportunity to add film production to our students’ education and integrate production into our existing program.”

Tom Hurvis, a 1960 Lawrence graduate and chairman and CEO of Old World Industries in Chicago, sees the program as a “game-changer for Lawrence.”

“It really puts the college into a different arena,” said Hurvis. “Here’s an innovation that is something new and it definitely fits with Lawrence. What else could potentially bring so many different members of the faculty together?”

Catherine Tatge '72

Award-winning filmmaker Catherine Tatge, a 1972 Lawrence graduate, will serve as a consultant to help get the program launched, offering workshops, assisting students and faculty with specific projects, and consulting with film studies faculty on how the Hurvis gift can best be put to use in curricular development.

“Catherine has expressed enthusiasm for the existing film studies program and is eager to work with faculty on an enhanced program that reflects Lawrence’s distinctiveness,” said Beck.

With more than 25 years of filmmaking experience, Tatge brings a unique vision for the development of a program that will be integrated through diverse areas of the Lawrence curriculum.

“I’m very excited about this new program,” said Tatge, whose latest documentary film, “John Muir in the New World,” premiered on PBS’ “American Masters” series earlier this year. “As a Lawrence graduate, I know the culture of this institution. Developing this program is really going to be a process, working with the faculty and with students to help build something that is uniquely tailored to Lawrence.”

2010 Lawrence graduate Garth Neustadter composed the score for the John Muir film and won an Emmy Award in the original music composition category.

The Hurvises are looking forward to watching the evolution of a distinctive film program rooted in Lawrence’s liberal arts tradition.

“This project is open-ended,” said Julie Hurvis, who graduated from Lawrence in 1961 with a degree in studio art. “We’re excited about it becoming a reality, as people are hired and begin working on the program.”

Filmmaking at Lawrence will promote cross fertilization throughout the campus, drawing upon resources from music performance, composition and arranging, art, dance, theatre, and creative writing. It aspires to engage many academic departments by making film another way for students and faculty to disseminate disciplinary research and ideas.

“Lawrence already has very good creative synergy with the conservatory of music, with art, the theatre department and other creative areas, so the film program will be a beautiful tie-in to all of those different creative juices,” said Tom Hurvis.

“I see bringing different parts of the university together to work on different aspects of the media and cinema process so that students will leave Lawrence being media-savvy and capable of effectively communicating their ideas,” added Tatge.

The Hurvis Center will be located in the renovated lower level of the former Jason Downer Commons. It will provide more than 5,500 square feet of new academic programming space, including a 2,000-square-foot central performance and screening venue for use by film studies and other disciplines, including theatre, dance and music. The large and flexible space will promote collaboration and cross fertilization among multiple disciplines.

The gift also will support the addition of a new faculty position to develop new offerings on filmmaking and a technical position to provide expertise in maintaining equipment and instruction on how to use it.

“Lawrence is truly fortunate to have philanthropists like Tom and Julie Hurvis among its alumni,” said Beck.  “They have a wonderful vision for Lawrence as one of the very best liberal arts institutions in the nation and have made landmark investments in the college to help it achieve that stature.”

Tom and Julie Hurvis’ interests in film include serving as producers of the 2009 award-winning documentary film “The Providence Effect.”  Winner of two film festival “Best Documentary” awards, the film chronicles the efforts of Paul Adams to transform Providence St. Mel, an all-black parochial school on Chicago’s notorious drug-ridden, gang-ruled West Side into a first-rank college preparatory school for its African-American student body.

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

Saxophonist Joe Connor ’15 Earns Second-Place Honors at State Competition

Lawrence University saxophonist Joe Connor will perform as guest artist with the Lakeshore Wind Ensemble March 10, 2012 after earning second-place honors in the 24th annual Lakeshore Wind Ensemble Young Artist Competition held Saturday, Nov. 12 in Manitowoc.

A freshman from Oregon, Wis., Connor received a second-place scholarship of $1,000. A student in the saxophone studio of Professor of Music Steven Jordheim, Connor performed Claude T. Smith’s “Fantasia for Alto Saxophone and Wind Ensemble.”

The statewide competition is open to musicians 16-25 years of age on all brass and woodwind wind ensemble instruments as well as piano and mallet percussion. In addition to Lawrence, it featured students from St. Norbert College, UW-Eau Claire, UW-Green Bay and UW-Madison.

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

Four Students Earn First-Place Honors at State Competition

Lawrence University’s Tory Wood won her second straight state title at the 2011 Wisconsin chapter of the National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) competition held Nov. 4-5 at Viterbo University in La Crosse.

Wood, of Escanaba, Mich., was one of four Lawrence students awarded first-place honors. She won the junior women’s division after winning the sophomore division in 2010.

Also earning first-place awards in their respective divisions were Max Kligman, Mill Valley, Calif.,  freshman men; Ian Koziara, Wheaton, Ill., sophomore men and Katy Harth, Naperville, Ill., upper level music theatre.

Ten of Lawrence’s 54 entries advanced to the competition finals. In addition to the four winners, two Lawrence students earned second-place honors and four were awarded third place. The first-place finishers each received $150 for their winning efforts, while second- and third-place finishers received $125 and $100, respectively.

The 2011 auditions drew nearly 400 singers from around the state who competed in 20 separate divisions by gender and level. Depending upon the category, NATS competitors are required to sing two, three or four classical pieces from different time periods with at least one selection sung in a foreign language.

Lawrence place winners with their category and (voice teacher) include:

First-Place Honors

• Tory Wood, junior women (Joanne Bozeman)

• Ian Koziara, sophomore men (Steven Spears)

• Max Kligman (Ken Bozeman)

• Katy Harth, upper level music theatre women (Karen Leigh-Post)

Second-Place Honors

• Clee McCracken, Elgin, Ill., freshman men (Steven Spears)

Alex York, Muskego, sophomore men (Steven Spears)

Third-Place Honors

• Kelsey Wang, Alhambra, Calif., freshman women (Teresa Seidl)

Zoie Reams, Chicago, Ill., sophomore women (John Gates)

Issa Ransom, Mount Vernon, N.Y., junior men (Steven Spears)

• Michael Pope, Chicago, Ill., senior men (Karen Leigh-Post)

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

Lawrence Spotlights Latin American Music, Art, Culture in Week-Long Festival

An artist-in-residency by award-winning Puerto Rican-born composer Roberto Sierra and the Arcos Trio highlight a week-long celebration of Latin American music, art and culture Nov. 4-12 at Lawrence University.  All festival events are free and open to the public.

The Latin American Chamber Music Festival will feature more than a half dozen performances by the Arcos Trio during the week, including the world premiere performance of Sierra’s piano trio composition “Trio IV ‘La noche’” Thursday, Nov. 10 in Harper Hall of the Music-Drama Center. Sierra will discuss his works in the context of Latin American music in a pre-concert address at 6:30 p.m.

The concert also will feature works by Brazilian composer Oscar Lorenzo Fernandez, Uruguayan composer Miguel del Aguila and arrangements of the popular tangos by Argentinian composer Astor Piazzolla. A reception with Latin American cuisine provided by Appleton restaurant Antojitos Mexicanos follows the concert.

Roberto Sierra

Sierra’s works have been part of the repertoire of many of the leading orchestras, ensembles and festivals in the United States and Europe for more than 30 years. His “Fandangos” was performed at the inaugural concert of the 2002 world renowned Proms in London by the BBC Symphony Orchestra in a concert that was broadcast by both the BBC Radio and Television throughout the United Kingdom and Europe.

His music has been performed by many of the leading orchestras in the country as well as the Royal Scottish National Orchestra, the Tonhalle Orchestra of Zurich, the Spanish orchestras of Madrid, Galicia, Castilla y León and Barcelona, among others.

“Roberto Sierra is representative of a dynamic cultural phenomenon created by one of the fastest growing demographic groups in the United States,” said Professor of Music Anthony Padilla, who has organized the festival. “His compositions are characterized by the cross-fertilization of American and Latin American music. Trio IV ‘La noche’ creates a fantastic tone picture of a tropical night in Puerto Rico, evoking the mysterious atmosphere of dusk, the sounds of creatures of the night and Caribbean dance rhythms. It will help fill an increasing demand in America for concert works that reflect and celebrate the contributions of Latin American culture.”

In addition to performing the premiere of “Trio IV ‘La noche’” the Arcos Trio will conduct a master class and perform several “preview” concerts in the community.

Arcos Trio — Seunghee Lee, Carl Donakowski and Anthony Padilla

Arcos Trio — pianist Padilla, violinist Seunghee Lee and cellist Carl Donakowski — was formed in 2005 with a mission to present an expanded canon of standard piano trio repertoire.  The Latin American Chamber Music Festival is the trio’s current project and will be reprized with performances in Michigan and Virginia.

The complete schedule includes:

• Friday Nov. 4 — Steinway and a Sandwich Series: Arcos Trio preview performance: Heid Music, Appleton, 12 noon.

Saturday, Sunday Nov. 5-6 — Arcos Trio preview performances, St. Therese and St. Pius X Catholic Churches weekend masses, Appleton.

• Sunday, Nov. 6 — Arcos Trio preview performance, Neenah Public Library, 2 p.m.,

• Monday–Friday, Nov. 7–11 —Mexican print collection display: Quirk Print Study Room, Wriston Art Center Galleries, 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.  Digital reproductions of this collection will be shown in Harper Hall lobby, Music-Drama Center.

• Monday Nov. 7 — Arcos Trio community outreach preview performances: Appleton East High School, 8:45 a.m. and 9:40 a.m.

Tuesday, Nov. 8 — Arcos Trio community outreach preview performance: Appleton Classical School, 12:50 p.m.

Tuesday, Nov. 8 — Master Class: Arcos Trio, Harper Hall, Music-Drama Center, 4:30 p.m.

• Wednesday, Nov. 9 — Preview Performance: Arcos Trio and Lawrence Conservatory students play works by Latin American composers, Harmony Café, downtown Appleton, 7 p.m.

• Thursday, Nov. 10 —Pre-concert lecture: Guest composer Roberto Sierra discusses his works in the context of Latin American music, Harper Hall, Music-Drama Center, 7 p.m.

• Thursday, Nov. 10 —Arcos Trio Concert: Premiere performance of “Trio No. 4 ‘La noche’” (2011), by Roberto Sierra, Harper Hall, Music-Drama Center, 8 p.m. Reception with Latin American cuisine from Antojitos Mexicanos follows.

• Friday, Nov. 11 —Question-and-answer session with guest composer Roberto Sierra, Harper Hall, Music-Drama Center, 4:30–5:30 p.m.

• Saturday, Nov. 12 — Spanish department and Latin American studies program presentations:  Gustavo Fares, professor of Spanish, “Tango! And nation building”; Jake Frederick, assistant professor of history, “The ‘New World’ of Latin America”; and Javier Guerrero, postdoctoral fellow in Spanish, “Sangrita Mexicana: Blood Weddings in Contemporary Mexico,” Harper Hall, Music-Drama Center, 1 p.m. A reception with Latin American cuisine from Antojitos Mexicanos follows.

Saturday, Nov. 12 —Student recitals: Lawrence students perform works by Latin American composers, Harper Hall, Music-Drama Center, 3 p.m.

The Latin American Chamber Music Festival received collaborative financial support from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Fox Valley Community Arts Fund within the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region, and the Wisconsin Arts Board with funds from the State of Wisconsin.

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

Author Alex Ross Talks Music at Lawrence University

Author and journalist Alex Ross, music critic for The New Yorker, spoke at Lawrence University Thursday, Nov. 3 about the continuities among various genres of music. He sat for a brief interview prior to his convocation.

“Compassionate” Manhole Covers Video, Lawrence Scholars Program Cited by CASE

A Lawrence University video chronicling the creation of  “compassionate” manhole covers by art students has been recognized with a 2011 Pride of CASE V Gold Award in the Best Video Feature category

Lawrence also received a Pride of CASE V Bronze Award in the Best Collaborative Program category for its Lawrence Scholars program.

The Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) honors institutions and individuals for outstanding achievement in the concept and execution of advancement programs and communications.

Rachel Crowl

Produced by Rachel Crowl, web content and new media coordinator at Lawrence, the compassionate manhole video follows the project from idea phase, through the casting process at Neenah Foundry to installation on the sidewalks in downtown Appleton and on the Lawrence campus.

The 12 custom-made manhole covers feature a different design depicting some aspect of each student’s own personal definition of compassion. The public art project was inspired by the community-wide Compassion Project, in which 10,000 Appleton school children used 6-by-6-inch ceramic tiles to create drawings and paintings of what compassion means to them.

“Rachel has done an exceptional job in bringing our video series to the next level,” said Cal Husmann, vice president for development, alumni relations and communications. “Her work has an artistic quality that helps tell Lawrence stories with an aesthetically pleasing style, while also being creative, authentic and often fun.  We are so pleased that her work has been recognized in this fashion. She deserves it.”

The Lawrence Scholars program was launched in 2008 to connect Lawrence alumni working in various business-related fields — banking, marketing, international finance, entrepreneurship and investment management, among others — with students for career counseling and networking opportunities.  Alumni return to campus throughout the academic year for day-long “summits” with students to share their expertise and experience.

Originally focused only on business, the scholars program has been so successful it has expanded into other careers, engaging alumni who are involved in law, medicine, arts and entertainment, government, international relations and environmental fields.

“The Lawrence Scholars in Business program has made an incredible impact on our students by expanding their understanding of career possibilities, while also providing a network for them to embark on their career search,” said Husmann.  “It’s been extremely gratifying seeing so many of our alumni enthusiastically giving back to the college through this innovative program.”

In addition to weekend summits with alumni, the Lawrence Scholars program sponsors a trip to Chicago each spring for students to meet with alumni working in major businesses there.  The program also offers two $5,000 student scholarships for a career development summer internship with Lawrence alumni.

Since it began, more than 100 Lawrence alumni and more than 600 students have participated in the Lawrence Scholars program.

Winners of the Pride of CASE V Awards will be recognized Dec. 11-13 at the 37th annual CASE V conference in Chicago.  District V includes institutions in Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota and Ohio.

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.