Category: Students

Election Night: College Democrats, Republicans Host Returns Viewing Party

In a display of true bipartisanship, members of the Lawrence University College Democrats and College Republicans will co-host  a “Rock the Results” event Tuesday, Nov. 6 on the second floor of the Warch Campus Center beginning at 8 p.m.

The entire campus community is invited to this “working together across the aisle” event to watch the election returns as they’re announced. In addition to a large map to track vote tallies, red/blue states and electoral college tote boards, the evening will feature live music, food and prizes.

“Rock the Results is designed for the entire Lawrence community and is an example of great collaboration between the Lawrence University Community Council, the LU College Democrats and the LU College Republicans,” said Curt Lauderdale, assistant dean of students for campus life. “Everyone involved with organizing this event hopes that the Rock the Results party can be an opportunity to celebrate not only the act of voting, but also demonstrate what it means to be part of a respectful and engaged community.

“Everyone who is eligible to vote is encouraged to participate in this critical election by casting their ballot,” Lauderdale added. “And everyone is invited to come and rock the results.”

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2013 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,450 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.

Ethnically Diverse Freshman Class Arrives Sept. 4 for 2012-13 Academic Year

Call it “back to the future.”

When Lawrence University welcomed its first class in November, 1849, 13 of the 35 students were Oneida Indians.

This year’s incoming class of new students will be nearly 12 times larger than that initial class, but Native Americans will once again be an integral part of the mix. Eight Native Americans, representing Indian nations in Arizona, Iowa, New Mexico and Wisconsin, will be among the 417 incoming freshmen of the Class of 2016.

This year’s class of 450 new students — the second-largest freshman class in Lawrence history (2010 was the largest with 452) along with 33 transfer students — arrives Tuesday, Sept. 4 to begin a week of orientation activities. Classes for Lawrence’s 164th academic year begin Monday, Sept. 10.

Emmet Yepa, one of the incoming Native American students from New Mexico, arrives on campus as a two-time Grammy Award nominee and a nationally-recognized youth leader.

Emmet Yepa ’16

Yepa began singing with the 14-member drumming ensemble Black Eagles shortly after the band won a Grammy in 2004 for “Flying Free” in the Best Native American Music Album category. Yepa helped the Black Eagles garner two more Grammy nominations in 2005 and 2007. He composed the song “Your Precious Smile,” a tribute to his younger sister, Angelina, for the 2007 Grammy-nominated album “Voice of the Drums.”

“I’ve been singing since I was very, very young,” said Yepa. “My dad introduced me to singing and I eventually joined the group. I sing every day. I’m always singing at home. I enjoy singing from the heart, lifting people’s spirits and making people happy.”

In 2010, Yepa and his father left the Black Eagles to form a new group, Northern Vibe, a nine-member drumming ensemble.

“We’ve had lots of people asking us if we’re going to do a CD. We’re in the process, but we haven’t completed it yet,” said Yepa, who has recording his own solo CD on his to-do list as well.

Yepa composes and performs both in English and the Towa language. Jemez Pueblo, Yepa’s hometown of 1,800 about 70 miles southwest of Santa Fe, is the only place in the world where Towa is spoken.

“It’s (Towa) pretty hard to pass on, because it’s not a written language, it’s only an oral language,” said Yepa, the oldest of four siblings.

Last December, Yepa added a “Champions of Change” award to his budding resume. Yepa was one of just 11 Native Americans nationally recognized in a White House ceremony with President Obama that honored individual efforts to give back to the community and demonstrate leadership. Yepa was cited for his efforts to establish the first-ever recycling program in Jemez Pueblo. The Walatowa (traditional name of Jemez) Green Stars Recycling Group headed by Yepa focuses on preserving and keeping ancestral lands beautiful through recycling.

Yepa is a member of one of the most ethnically and geographically diverse incoming classes Lawrence has ever had:

21 percent (88) of the 417 freshmen are students of color.

38 states and 18 countries are represented

Five of the top 10 states from which this year’s freshmen hail are Western states — California, New Mexico, Colorado, Washington and Oregon.

41  freshmen are international students, with China (6), Vietnam (4) and Ghana (3) accounting for the most.

Academically, 45 percent of this year’s freshmen ranked in the top 10 percent of their graduating class while 70 percent were in the top quarter of their class. The average grade point average of the incoming freshmen was 3.62.

“In terms of academic quality, this year’s class looks very similar to last year’s class,” said Ken Anselment, dean of admissions and financial aid.  “However, this year we enrolled a class that, in addition to being one of our largest, is more ethnically and geographically diverse than we have seen in a very long time.”

Approximately 80 percent of the freshmen are enrolling in Lawrence’s college of liberal arts and sciences while 20 percent are enrolling in the conservatory of music.

Ninety-four percent of incoming freshmen received need- or merit-based financial aid with need-based financial aid packages averaging $30,600.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2013 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,450 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.

Three Lawrence University Seniors Awarded U.S. Fulbright Scholarships for Teaching, Research Programs

Germany and Taiwan soon will become the new home addresses for three Lawrence University seniors awarded Fulbright U.S. Student Program scholarships.

Amanda Barrow, a double major in music and Chinese language and literature from Savannah, Ga., and Elise Mozena, an English major from Iowa City, Iowa, will travel to Kaohsiung, Taiwan and the German state of Schleswig-Holstein, respectively, as English-as-a-foreign-language instructors and unofficial goodwill ambassadors.

Katelin Richter, of Watertown, Minn., who will graduate with a bachelor of arts degree in German and a bachelor of music degree in oboe performance, also will travel to Germany, where she will begin an orchestra management master’s program at a university in either Frankfurt or Munich.

All three students will be initiated June 9 into Lawrence’s chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, the oldest honorary society in America, which awards membership to seniors who have demonstrated superior scholarship.

14 Lawrence Fulbright Winners in Last Five Years

Since 2008, 14 Lawrence seniors have been awarded teaching or research scholarships through the Fulbright Program.  The flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government, it is designed to increase mutual understanding between Americans and peoples of other countries. Fulbright recipients are selected on the basis of academic or professional achievement, as well as demonstrated leadership potential in their fields. The program operates in more than 155 countries worldwide.

“We are very excited about the Fulbright awards,” said Provost and Dean of the Faculty David Burrows. “The recipients have done excellent work at Lawrence. They are intelligent, thoughtful persons who are embarking on a commitment to being citizens of the world, engaged in effective and ethical action.”

Amanda Barrow '12

Barrow, a self-proclaimed language lover, studied Spanish throughout high school, but upon arriving at Lawrence, wanted to try something completely new, which turned out to be Chinese.

She spent six months in Beijing in 2010 at the Minzu University of China on a study-abroad program and returned to China last summer for two months as part of a small field studies program that traveled to rural communities throughout the country setting up camps to teach English and music.  The 12-month-long Fulbright appointment will be her first trip to Taiwan and, much to her delight, will take her to the country’s second-largest city, where she will be assigned to either an elementary or middle school.

“I was interested in being part of a large community and all the opportunities that are available in an urban area.  I really enjoy the large-city environment,” said Barrow, who plays the flute. “I’m hoping to get involved in the school’s music curriculum and combine my language and music skills, something I haven’t had a chance to do much yet.  I’m looking forward to seeing if teaching is what I really want to do. This will be a great opportunity to find out.”

Elise Mozena '12

Mozena spent four months as a 17-year-year-old au pair near Frankfurt, Germany in 2007. Tutoring six-and eight-year-old brothers on the basics of English were among her duties.  She’s still waiting for confirmation as to what level of students she’ll be teaching on her 10-month Fulbright position, with possibilities ranging from fifth grade through high school.

“I’m looking forward to the challenge of teaching and living on my own in a foreign country,” said Mozena. “I fell in love with the German people and German culture when I was there five years ago and am excited about returning and re-immersing myself in all things German.”

Exploring opportunities to feed her interests in theater, either in her eventual school’s theater program or possibly in a local community theater, will be high on Mozena’s priority list once she arrives in Germany.

Job or Scholarship?

Katelin Richter '12

Richter already had a good job offer from a national company when news of her Fulbright study/research grant arrived, presenting a tough decision. The choice became easier after Deloitte agreed to hold its consulting job offer in Washington, D.C., until she returns in 2013.

During the 11-month grant period, Richter will pursue research on financial innovation in the nonprofit symphony orchestra sector in Germany, with a focus on strategies potentially adoptable for American orchestras.

“I’m interested in orchestra management and today symphonies across the world are facing structural financial challenges,” said Richter. “Germany has a long cultural history of orchestras, which presents a unique environment in which to do my research. German orchestras in general receive more state support than American orchestras, but state support there is becoming less certain. I’m interested in investigating how German orchestras are meeting current financial challenges and whether there might be the opportunity to synthesize cross-cultural knowledge of benefit to orchestras both in the U.S. and abroad.”

Richter, an oboist in the Lawrence Symphony Orchestra, is no stranger to Germany. In addition to visiting relatives there, she spent the summer of 2010 on a Lawrence-sponsored internship, helping to promote a state-wide, 120-concert classical music festival. She returned to Germany last summer on an internship through the U.S. State Department, working in the Political-Economics Section of the U.S. Consulate in Munich.

Since its establishment in 1946, the Fulbright Program has provided approximately 300,000 students, scholars, teachers, artists and scientists the opportunity to study, teach and conduct research, exchange ideas and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns.

Fulbright alumni have achieved distinction in government, science, the arts, business, philanthropy, education, and athletics. Forty Fulbright alumni from 11 countries have been awarded the Nobel Prize, and 75 alumni have received Pulitzer Prizes.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges by Forbes, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries. Follow us on Facebook.

Student Work Showcased in Film Studies Program Film Festival

The talents of eight Lawrence University student filmmakers will be showcased Saturday, June 2 in the Lawrence Film Program Student Film Festival. The festival, which begins at 7 p.m. in the Warch Campus Center Cinema, is free and open to the public.

Highlighting the interdisciplinary nature of the Lawrence film studies program, the festival features collaborative projects between film studies and biology, English and government departments as well as the Conservatory of Music.  The films were produced under the supervision of visiting artist-in-residence Catherine Tatge ’72.

The festival line-up includes:

  • “Laundromat” by Brooks Eaton. A comedy about the on-goings in a college laundromat. (2 minutes)
  • “Terrort” by Tom Coben. One man’s struggle with crippling paranoia helps him find what he had all along: friendship. (7 minutes)
  • “Mulligan” by Alex Kohnstamm. A young man tries to figure out his life one day at a time, but his mother has other plans for him. (10 minutes)
  • “Lemonade” by Camilla Grove. A young married couple’s daughter goes missing. They use lemonade as a way to both bring her back and repair their marriage. (7 minutes)
  • “Epigenetics” by Katie Simonsen. An informational video about how nurture shapes nature. (5 minutes)
  • “Left Out, Left Behind” by Marie Jeruc. A documentary about the disadvantages left-handed students face in academic settings. (5 minutes)
  • “Autism in Schools” by Kaylin Burton. A documentary about difficulties children with autism have in the classroom and misconceptions people have about these children and their needs. (5 minutes)
  • “FAWE: Girl Power in Sierra Leone” by Mariah Mateo. A documentary about FAWE, an extraordinary African organization working in Sierra Leone with young girls and women. (5 minutes)

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges by Forbes, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries. Follow us on Facebook.

Carly Roe ’13 Recognized for Research by Geology Institute

Lawrence University junior Carly Roe was recognized for her research presentation on an unusual rock unit in central Wisconsin at the recent annual meeting of the Institute on Lake Superior Geology held in Thunder Bay, Ontario.

Carly Roe '13

Roe, a geology and Russian studies major from Greenville, received second-place honors for her poster describing research on an unusual rock unit from the Baraboo area that is known only from drill cores taken in the early 20th century. Her research has implications for the oxidation state of the atmosphere in the geologic period following the initial appearance of limited amounts of free oxygen.

One of more than two dozen student presenters at the annual conference, Roe received $100 as part of her award.

The Institute on Lake Superior Geology is a non-profit professional society that provides a forum for the exchange of geological ideas and scientific data and promoting better understanding of the geology of the Lake Superior region. Its annual meeting draws geologists from the United States, Canada and throughout the world.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges by Forbes, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries. Follow us on Facebook.

Senior Art Exhibition Opens May 25 at Wriston Galleries

The work of 14 Lawrence University art majors will be featured in the annual Senior Art Exhibit that opens Friday, May 25 in the Wriston Art Center galleries. The exhibition, which runs through July 29, opens at 6 p.m. with a reception with the student artists.

"Wilmer," oil on canvas, Annie Raccuglia

The exhibition includes books, ceramics, drawings, paintings, photography, prints, sculpture and video. To see each artists work, please check out our LUX site on the show.

The students whose work will be featured are Suzanne Craddock, Aisha Eiger, Kaitlyn Herzog, Eli Hungerford, Kelly  Mariahazy, Katie Nelson, Sydney Pertl, Annie Raccuglia, Hillary Rogers, Alison Scattergood, Christine Lyn Seeley, Sara Sheldon-Rosson, Timeka Toussaint and Jinglei Xiao.

The Wriston Art Center galleries are free and open to the public Tuesday-Friday from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Saturday-Sunday from noon – 4 p.m. The galleries are closed on Mondays. For more information on the exhibition, call 920-832-6890 or visit www.lawrence.edu/news/wriston.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges by Forbes, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries. Follow us on Facebook.

Environmental Interests Earn Hava Blair ’13 Udall Scholarship

Hava Blair’s “green” passions have helped her earn a little “green.” The Lawrence University junior has been named one of 80 national recipients of a $5,000 Udall Scholarship.

She was selected from among 585 candidates nominated by 274 institutions from 49 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Lawrence was the only Wisconsin college or university to have a 2012 Udall Scholar.

Hava Blair '13

Presented by the Arizona-based Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation, the scholarships are awarded to students committed to careers related to the environment, tribal public policy or Native American health care.

“I’m passionate about developing sustainable food systems that incorporate the diversity of the natural world,” said Blair, a geology major from Jefferson who has been heavily involved in the Sustainable Lawrence University Garden (SLUG) since arriving on campus in 2009. “Practicing and teaching sustainable agriculture has the potential to improve not only the food we eat, but the communities we live in and the economies in which we participate.”

As a Udall Scholar, Blair will participate in a four-day orientation Aug. 8-12 in Tucson, Ariz., where she will meet with environmental policymakers and community leaders as well as other scholarship recipients and program alumni.

“I’m excited to attend the summit with fellow Udall Scholars and engage in a dialogue about current environmental challenges and solutions,” said Blair. “The funds from this scholarship will help to support the work I am doing in the Lawrence and Fox Cities community. I’m very grateful for the recognition.”

In addition to her role of manager of SLUG, Blair helped launch Lawrence’s first beekeeping operation in 2011, tending to five beehives and more than 200,000 European honeybees. Last fall, Blair harvested 110 pounds of honey — about $700 worth — half of which was sold to Lawrence’s dining service and the rest sold to faculty and staff. The sales are used to support the garden and beekeeping operation.

Beyond the campus, Blair has been an active volunteer with COTS, Inc., Appleton’s temporary, transitional housing program and its innovative Riverview community garden project.

Blair is the fourth Lawrence student to receive a Udall Scholarship in the program’s 16-year history, joining Jacob Brenner (1999), Gustavo Setrini (2001), and Stephen Rogness (2003).

Founded in 1992, the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation is one of five federal foundations established by Congress. Among the missions of the foundation is to increase awareness of the importance of the nation’s natural resources, identify critical environmental issues and provide educational outreach regarding environmental policy.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges by Forbes, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries. Follow us on Facebook.

Annual Harrison Symposium Showcases Student Research in the Humanities, Social Sciences

Exceptional student research in the humanities and social sciences on topics as diverse as the history of Waldorf education and women’s changing roles in modern Chinese fiction  will be showcased Saturday, May 19 beginning at 9:15 a.m. in Main Hall during Lawrence University’s 15th annual Richard A. Harrison Symposium.

Thirty-four students will deliver presentations during two sessions arranged into panels by topic or field that are moderated by a Lawrence faculty member. Presenters are nominated by faculty and invited to submit abstracts of their research. Students are selected for the symposium based on the abstracts and present their work in the format used for professional meetings of scholars in the humanities and social sciences.

Each presentation lasts approximately 20 minutes and is followed by a 10-minute question-and-answer session. Among the topics that will be explored in this year’s symposium are the condition of education in rural Ecuador, the detrimental effects of the loss of a parent in childhood, the politics of music in Sierra Leone and the work of the late painter Thomas Kinkade.

The symposium honors former Lawrence Dean of the Faculty Richard A. Harrison, who organized the first program in 1996. Harrison died unexpectedly the following year and the symposium was renamed after him to recognize his vision of highlighting excellent student scholarship.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges by Forbes, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries. Follow us on Facebook.

Community Invited to “Louis XIV’s Versailles” for an Evening of Baroque Dance

The Lawrence Baroque Ensemble hosts “An Evening of Baroque Dance: Louis XIV Masque Ball” Friday, May 18 in the Warch Campus Center.

Members of the Lawrence and Fox Valley communities are invited to participate as dancers or as spectators in an “interactive performance” designed to transport everyone back to the splendor of King Louis XIV’s Versailles. The evening begins at 6:30 p.m. with hor d’oeuvres followed by a formal masque ball at 7 p.m.

Lawrence President Jill Beck and Visiting Professor of Dance Rebecca Salzer will provide instruction in two large-group French Baroque dances. No dance or music experience is necessary to participate. Etiquette tips on how to show proper reverence in the presence of a king also will also offered.

The evening will include a performance of a choreographed minuet and Lawrence music historian Sara Ceballos will provide historical context throughout the evening on the power of music at Louis’ court and the empowering effect of concealing one’s identity at a masquerade.

The Lawrence Baroque Ensemble, along with members of the Lawrence trumpet and oboe studios, will provide music throughout the evening, creating an authentic grand ball atmosphere. Complimentary masks will be provided.

The evening will culminate with the audience’s performance of the dances taught by Beck and Salzer.

Space is limited and reservations are requested online. Complete and submit the RSVP form. (Clicking “attend” will not register you.) Formal attire is requested and low-heeled shoes are recommended.

The Lawrence Baroque Ensemble was founded in 2010 by four students as part of the economics course “Entrepreneurship in the Arts & Society.” Its goal is to study, rehearse and perform baroque music that enriches students’ liberal arts experience, inspires passion for period-instrument performance, preserves tradition and celebrates individual creativity. Lawrence Baroque connects audiences to history through unique concert experiences.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges by Forbes, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries. Follow us on Facebook.

Lawrence University Musicians Shine in State Piano Competition

Lawrence University sophomore Thomas Lee earned first-place honors at the recent 2012 Wisconsin Music Teachers Association’s annual Badger Collegiate Piano Competition conducted at UW-Marathon County in Wausau.

Thomas Lee '14

A double-degree candidate from Chicago, Ill., majoring in  piano performance with an emphasis in pedagogy, Lee received $200 for his winning performance, which included five works: J.S. Bach’s “Prelude and Fugue 18 in G-sharp Minor”; Beethoven’s “Piano Sonata op. 31 no. 3”; Liszt’s “Sposalizio”; and Nikolai Medtner’s “Fairy Tale op. 8 no. 1”; and “Primavera op. 39 no. 3.”

Lawrence accounted for six of the eight students entered in the WMTA competition, with junior Julian Delfino, a double degree candidate from Irvine, Calif., with majors in piano performance and English, earning honorable mention honors.

Also representing Lawrence were freshman Seth King-Gengler, Waukesha, sophomores Daniel Kuzuhara, Madison, and Catherine Smith, Greenville, N.C., and junior Alex Hurlburt, Wausau.

All six students study in the piano studio of Associate Professor of Music Anthony Padilla.

The WMTA Badger Collegiate Piano Competition is open to college students under the age of 28. Participants must perform from memory a solo recital program of 20-30 minutes in length with works representing contrasting styles from three of five historical periods: Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Impressionistic, Contemporary.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges by Forbes, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries. Follow us on Facebook.