LU Insider

LU Insider

Internal Communications

Library Summer Coffeehouse Series 2022

It’s time once again for the library’s summer coffeehouse series! If you’re unfamiliar with the coffeehouses, they provide an opportunity to socialize just a bit and to learn about resources and services available to help you with work or leisure interests. We start promptly at 10:00 and end at 10:45. We’ll provide a cool beverage and a snack. All members of the Lawrence community are welcome to attend.

July 13: Summer Reads (outdoor, weather permitting)
The ever-popular Summer Reading coffeehouse returns! Planning your beach reading? Got your own summer reading underway? Come and hear about favorite reads from library staff and whoever else shows up. It could – and should – be you!

July 27: Welcome to the Makerspace (indoor)
Have you been hoping to use the Makerspace with your coursework or academic work but not sure how? Come to this coffeehouse session to learn about the ways your colleagues have been using 3D printers, sewing machines, the laser cutter, and more to incorporate hands-on learning and help their students reach their curricular goals in subjects all over campus.

August 10: Let’s Talk Cookbooks (outdoor, weather permitting)
If you like to cook, you probably have more than one favorite cookbook. Maybe baking and cooking helped you make it through the worst of the pandemic. In any case, we’re taking time to talk about our favorite cookbooks–and our favorite food writing–and discover more.

See previous summer coffeehouse book, cookbook, and podcast recommendations (and more!) on the Summer Coffeehouse Series research guide.

New Employees/Rehires/Promotions

If you see them on campus, please welcome them to Lawrence!

New Employees:

Tina Franzen – Assistant to the Registrar’s Office

Sarah Gamalinda – Assistant Professor of French and Francophone Studies

Kevin Dessart – Head Women’s Ice Hockey Coach

Promotions:

Scott Lefeber – Print and Mail Specialist

Peter Blitstein – Interim Provost, Dean of the Faculty and Associate Professor of History

Daniel Damiani – Photographer and Multimedia Specialist

Jaime Gonzalez – Associate Director of Admission – Regional

Joe King – Assistant Vice President of Facilities Operations

Matt Schmeltzer – Director of Creative Services

Cheryl Boyle – Assistant Director of Lawrence Community Music School

Mary Kate Smith – Director of Conservatory Admissions

Kelly Coenen – Senior Administrative Assistant

Rehires:

Sarah Haas – Custodian

Shayni Paul – Assistant Women’s Soccer Coach

Important Campus Construction Updates

LU Riverside Trail: paving is complete! Next up – trail lights and access gates.

Kohler Hall: work continues on the window install and basement renovation.

Music Drama: the ceilings have been removed and currently the demo of the old HVAC systems is underway.

Warch Campus Center: work has begun on the 2nd floor removing of existing flooring, which will be replaced with terrazzo.

Drew St. Pedestrian Bridge: work continues as the foundational structures are installed.

As always – safety first! Do not enter construction areas! Please be mindful of your surroundings at all times as most construction and projects are in full swing. Should you have questions or see anything concerning as you’re out and about, please contact Katherine in Facility Services at: Katherine.lehman@lawrence.edu or at ext. 6893

LU Insider July Publication Schedule

The LU Insider will be published twice during the month of July–Thursday, July 7, and Thursday, July 21.

Please continue to submit posts to the LU Insider blog throughout the month. Communications will publish the posts as they are received, and the posts will appear on MyLU. Posts will also be shared in the two editions of the newsletter noted above.

Please email communications@lawrence.edu if you have any questions, and continue to follow campus events online.

Using Portable Generators Safely

There are specific hazards inherent with the use of generators that must be addressed to ensure that workers and others using such equipment remain safe.

Portable generators are internal combustion engines used to generate electricity and they are useful when temporary or remote power is needed. They are commonly used during cleanup and recovery efforts following disasters such as severe storms, tornadoes, etc.

Side view of electrical outlets on a portable generator.

Hazards Associated with Generators

  • Shocks and electrocution from improper use of power or accidentally energizing other electrical systems.
  • Carbon monoxide from a generator’s exhaust.
  • Fires from improperly refueling a generator or inappropriately storing the fuel for a generator.
  • Noise and vibration hazards.

Shock and Electrocution
The electricity created by generators has the same hazards as normal utility-supplied electricity. It also has some additional hazards because generator users often bypass the safety devices (such as circuit breakers) that are built into electrical systems. The following precautions are provided to reduce shock and electrocution hazards:

  • Never attach a generator directly to the electrical system of a structure (home, office, trailer, etc.) unless a qualified electrician has properly installed the generator with a transfer switch. Attaching a generator directly to a building electrical system without a properly installed transfer switch can energize wiring systems for great distances. This creates a risk of electrocution for utility workers and others in the area.
  • Always plug electrical appliances directly into the generator using the manufacturer’s supplied cords or extension cords that are grounded (3-pronged). Inspect the cords to make sure they are fully intact and not damaged, cut or abraded. Never use frayed or damaged extension cords. Ensure the cords are appropriately rated in watts or amps for the intended use. Do not use underrated cords—replace them with appropriately rated cords that use heavier gauge wires. Do not overload a generator; this can lead to overheating which can create a fire hazard.
  • Use ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs), especially where electrical equipment is used in or around wet or damp locations. GFCIs shut off power when an electrical current is detected outside normal paths. GFCIs and extension cords with built-in GFCI protection can be purchased at hardware stores, do-it-yourself centers, and other locations that sell electrical equipment. Regardless of GFCI use, electrical equipment used in wet and damp locations must be listed and approved for those conditions.
  • Make sure a generator is properly grounded and the grounding connections are tight. Consult the manufacturer’s instructions for proper grounding methods.
  • Keep a generator dry; do not use it in the rain or wet conditions. If needed, protect a generator with a canopy. Never manipulate a generator’s electrical components if you are wet or standing in water.
  • Do not use electrical equipment that has been submerged in water. Equipment must be thoroughly dried out and properly evaluated before using. Power off and do not use any electrical equipment that has strange odors or begins smoking.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless, toxic gas. Many people have died from CO poisoning because their generator was not adequately ventilated.

Never use a generator indoors or in enclosed spaces such as garages, crawl spaces, and basements. NOTE: Open windows and doors may NOT prevent CO from building up when a generator is located in an enclosed space.

  • Make sure a generator has 3 to 4 feet of clear space on all sides and above it to ensure adequate ventilation.
  • Do not use a generator outdoors if its placement near doors, windows, and vents could allow CO to enter and build up in occupied spaces.
  • If you or others show symptoms of CO poisoning—dizziness, headaches, nausea, tiredness—get to fresh air immediately and seek medical attention. Do not re-enter the area until it is determined to be safe by trained and properly equipped personnel.
Danger – portable generator placed near an open window.

Fire Hazards

  • Generators become hot while running and remain hot for long periods after they are stopped. Generator fuels (gasoline, kerosene, etc.) can ignite when spilled on hot engine parts.
  • Before refueling, shut down the generator and allow it to cool.
  • Gasoline and other generator fuels should be stored and transported in approved containers that are properly designed and marked for their contents, and vented.
  • Keep fuel containers away from flame producing and heat generating devices (such as the generator itself, water heaters, cigarettes, lighters, and matches). Do not smoke around fuel containers. Escaping vapors or vapors from spilled materials can travel long distances to ignition sources.
  • Do not store generator fuels in your home.Store fuels away from living areas.

Noise and Vibration Hazards

  • Generator engines vibrate and create noise. Excessive noise and vibration could cause hearing loss and fatigue that may affect job performance.
  • Keep portable generators as far away as possible from work areas and gathering spaces.
  • Wear hearing protection if this is not possible.

Portable Generator Safety Virtual Demonstration

Jun 24, 2011. A portable generator can be a powerful tool during a power outage or natural disaster, but it can also be dangerous — even deadly — if not properly installed and operated. On average, 75 people are killed in the United States each year by carbon monoxide associated with the use of generators. Make sure you know how to use generators safely before you put yourself — and your loved ones — at risk.

Portable generator safety video screenshot


Sources: Sources: OSHA Fact Sheet – Using Portable Generators Safely and Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_iPRmSOJGoA






Bart De Stasio to speak on climate change in Door County

Bart De Stasio, Singleton Professor of Biological Sciences and professor of biology, will deliver a talk this Friday in Sturgeon Bay. Warmer, Wetter, and Wilder will address anticipated effects of climate change on Door County and Green Bay, Lake Michigan.

It’s set for 7 p.m. June 24 at Crossroads at Big Creek, 2041 Michigan St., Sturgeon Bay. It’s hosted by Climate Change Coalition of Door County. For more information, visit climatechangedoorcounty.com.

New Employees/Rehires/Promotions

If you see them on campus, please welcome them to Lawrence!

New Employees:

Kaden Kolosso – Bon Appetit

Diana Hernandez – Payroll and Human Resources Coordinator

Grace Guilette – Bjorklunden Summer Staff

Makayla Raley – Circulation Services Assistant and Night Supervisor

Riley Szymik – Materials Management Assistant

Nolan Richey – Materials Management Assistant

Anne Brink – Helpdesk Coordinatior

Addison DeShambo – Summer Research Assistant

Sophie Ulik – Summer Research Assistant

Brett Wall – Head Men’s Ice Hockey Coach

Promotions

Jen Mielke – Technology and Print Service Manager

Peter Chang – Admissions Counselor, Coordinator of Access & Outreach

Lightning Safety Tips

Learn indoor and outdoor safety tips to protect yourself and your loved ones from lightning.

Image of a lightning strike from National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) flyer.

Go Indoors.
Remember the phrase, “When thunder roars, go indoors.” If you hear thunder, you are within striking distance of lightning. Find a safe, enclosed shelter when you hear thunder. Safe shelters include homes, offices, shopping centers, and hard-top vehicles with the windows rolled up. Wait at least 30 minutes after hearing the last clap of thunder before leaving your shelter. 

Indoor Safety Tips

Even though your home is a safe shelter during a lightning storm, you might still be at risk. About one-third of lightning-strike injuries occur indoors. Here are some tips to keep safe and reduce your risk of being struck by lightning while indoors.

Avoid water.
Do NOT bathe, shower, wash dishes, or have any other contact with water during a thunderstorm because lightning can travel through a building’s plumbing. The risk of lightning traveling through plumbing might be less with plastic pipes than with metal pipes. However, it is best to avoid any contact with plumbing and running water during a lightning storm to reduce your risk of being struck.

Don’t touch electronic equipment.
Do NOT use anything connected to an electrical outlet, such as computers, laptops, game systems, washers, dryers, or stoves. Lightning can travel through electrical systems, radio and television reception systems, and any metal wires or bars in concrete walls or flooring. Equip your home with whole-house surge protectors to protect your appliances.

Avoid windows, doors, porches, and concrete.
Stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches. Do NOT lie on concrete floors or lean on concrete walls during a thunderstorm. Lightning can travel through any metal wires or bars in concrete walls or flooring.

Don’t use corded phones.
Corded phones are NOT safe to use during a thunderstorm. Do NOT use them. However, it is safe to use cordless or cellular phones during a storm.

Outdoor Safety Tips

Although no place outside is safe during a thunderstorm, you can minimize your risk by assessing the lightning threat early and taking appropriate actions. The best defense is to avoid lightning. Here are some outdoor safety tips that can help you avoid being struck by lightning.

Be aware.
Check the weather forecast before participating in outdoor activities. If the forecast calls for thunderstorms, postpone your trip or activity, or make sure suitable safe shelter is readily available.

Seek shelter immediately, even if caught out in the open.
If you are caught in an open area, act quickly to find shelter. The most important action is to remove yourself from danger. Crouching or getting low to the ground can reduce your chances of being struck, but it does not remove you from danger.

Avoid open spaces.
Immediately get out and stay away from open spaces such as golf courses, parks, playgrounds, ponds, lakes, swimming pools, and beaches. Get off of elevated areas such as hills, mountain ridges, or peaks.

Don’t stay in open vehicles.
During a thunderstorm, avoid open vehicles such as convertibles, motorcycles, and golf carts.

Don’t stay in open structures.
Avoid open structures such as porches, gazebos, baseball dugouts, and sports arenas. These structures won’t protect you from lightning.

Don’t stay near tall structures.
Avoid anything tall or high, including rooftops, scaffolding, utility poles, cell phone towers, ladders, trees, and large equipment, such as bulldozers, cranes, and tractors. Lightning tends to strike the tallest object around.

If you are out in the open water and a storm rolls in, return to shore immediately.
If you are on a boat in open water when a thunderstorm rolls in, return to shore immediately and seek shelter. If you are unable to return to shore, boats with cabins offer some protection. If caught in a storm in a small boat with no cabin, drop anchor and get as low as possible.

Stay away from objects that conduct electricity (such as barbed wire fences, power lines, or windmills). Do NOT touch materials or surfaces that conduct electricity, including metal scaffolding, metal equipment, utility lines, water, water pipes, or plumbing.

Image of a lightning strike.

People Who Work Outside are at Higher Risk

People at greatest risk of being struck by lightning are those who work outdoors in open spaces, on or near tall objects, or near materials that conduct electricity or engage in outdoor recreational activities.

The following occupations have the highest risk of lightning strikes:

  • Construction and building maintenance
  • Roofing
  • Heavy equipment operation
  • Pipe-fitting or plumbing
  • Power utility field repair
  • Landscaping

Take Steps to Protect Yourself

Check the forecast – (install a weather alert app on your cell phone)

Know the daily weather forecast so you are prepared and know what weather to expect during the day.

Watch for signs of potential lightning strikes

Pay attention to early weather signs of potential lightning strikes, such as high winds, dark clouds, or distant thunder or lightning. When these occur, don’t start any activity that you can’t quickly stop. Lightning may strike as far as 10 miles from any rain. Wait at least 30 minutes after hearing the last clap of thunder before leaving your shelter. 

First aid

If your coworker is struck by lightning, call 911. Immediately begin first aid, if necessary. People who have been struck by lightning DO NOT carry an electrical charge and can be handled safely.

Resources:

https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/lightning/safetytips.html; https://www.weather.gov/media/owlie/OSHA_FS-3863_Lightning_Safety_05-2016.pdf; https://www.nfpa.org/-/media/Files/Public-Education/Resources/Safety-tip-sheets/Lightning_Safety.ashx

Silent Bike Auction set for June 28

Silent Bike Auction

Located at Facility Services, 235 E. Water Street (please note: the LU Trail will be closed)

Tuesday, June 28,  8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

No bids accepted after 3:00 p.m. on Tuesday, June 28

Winners will be notified by Wednesday, June 29.

*Payment due on day of pick up (exact cash or check made out to Lawrence University)

All bikes must be picked up by Thursday, June 30 no later than 3 PM

All unclaimed bikes will be awarded to the next highest bidder

All bikes are sold “AS IS”

Important Campus Construction Updates

Groundbreaking for the construction of the new Gateway Arch will begin next week!

The LU Trail along the river is being paved next week starting Monday, June 27th, and will be inaccessible for the duration of the week.

Colman Hall is looking sharp with some fresh paint on floors 1 & 2, the North wing and lofts, and new carpeting in the hallways on floors 2, 3 and 4! Next up – new ceiling tiles on floors 2, 3 & 4.

Work to replace the second floor terrazzo in Warch will begin next week.

As always – safety first! Do not enter construction areas! Please be mindful of your surroundings at all times as most construction and projects are really ramping up. Should you have questions or see anything concerning as you’re out and about, please contact Katherine in Facility Services at: Katherine.lehman@lawrence.edu or at ext. 6893