Category: Academics

Campus Memorial Service Planned for Professor Emeritus Mojmir Povolny

An on-campus celebration of the remarkable life of Mojmir Povolny, Lawrence University professor emeritus of government and the Henry M. Wriston Professor of Social Sciences who recently passed away, is planned for Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Warch Campus Center Nathan Marsh Pusey Room.

Professor Emeritus Mojmir Povolny

Everyone is welcome to attend the memorial service as well as submit any memories or reflections celebrating Professor Povolny’s life and career. A selection of the submissions will be read at the service and all letters will be assembled and presented to the Povolny family.

Anyone interested in sharing a letter or memory can submit them electronically to Janice Staedt at janice.staedt@lawrence.edu or mail them to:

Lawrence University
Attn: Janice Staedt
711 E Boldt Way SPC 18
Appleton, WI  54911

All submissions need to be received by Friday, October 19.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2013 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,450 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.

An Update from the Chair of the Presidential Search Committee

Over the summer months, the Presidential Search Committee has made steady progress on its timetable to permit the appointment of a new President before December 1, 2012 (or as soon as possible thereafter).

First, we would like to thank all of you who nominated or brought to our attention names of individuals who you felt qualified for this position. No suggestions were ignored. Combining your input with that of Isaacson, Miller, our search partner, we were able to develop a pool of well-qualified candidates.

We are in the process of winnowing down the size of the candidate pool-reviewing qualifications, conducting reference checks, and will soon be involved with face-to-face interviews of a preliminary select group.

While we recognize that everyone is very curious of our progress, please respect the position of committee members who are pledged to confidentiality in order to protect the reputations of individuals considering our position as President of Lawrence University.

Previous announcements can be found on the Presidential  Search page.

Dale Schuh, Chairman
Lawrence Presidential Search Committee

Senator Russ Feingold Opens Lawrence University Annual International Lecture Series Sept. 20

Former U.S. Senator Russ Feingold, who represented Wisconsin in the Senate for 18 years, opens Lawrence University’s 2012 Povolny Lecture Series in International Studies Thursday, Sept. 20.

Feingold presents “While America Sleeps – A Wake-up Call for the Post-9/11 Era” at 7:30 p.m. in Stansbury Theatre in the Music-Drama Center. The event is free and open to the public.

The address also will be webcast live by The Post-Crescent beginning at 7:25 p.m. Watch it online here.

He is spending part of the Fall Term at Lawrence teaching in the government department as the college’s Stephen Edward Scarff Distinguished Visiting Professor. Lawrence recognized Feingold with an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree at its 2011 commencement ceremony.

Senator Russ Feingold

The address is based on Feingold’s 2011 New York Times best-selling book of the same title, which examines the challenges America faces as a nation since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, including national security and constitutional values. Feingold argues the oversimplification of complex problems have helped undermined America’s ability to effectively adjust to its new place in the world.

Among Wisconsin’s highest-profile elected officials, Feingold spent 28 years in public service as both a three-time state senator (1982-92) and U.S. Senator (1993-2011). While in Congress, Feingold established himself as one of the Senate’s most independent voices, casting the lone vote against the Patriot Act in 2001, opposing President Obama’s decision to expand the war in Afghanistan and fighting against NAFTA and other financial deregulation and trade agreements he considered unfair.

After leaving public office, Feingold founded Progressives United, a grassroots organization designed to counter corporate influence in politics.

Mark Frazier, professor of politics and the academic director of the India China Institute at The New School in New York City, delivers the series’ second address. Frazier examines the pending change in leadership in China in “Who is Xi?  The Knowns and Unknowns in China’s Political Future” Tuesday, Oct. 23 at 7:30 p.m. in the Wriston Art Center auditorium.

The Povolny Lecture Series, named in honor of long-time Lawrence government professor Mojmir Povolny, who passed away in August, promotes interest and discussion on issues of moral significance and ethical dimensions.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2013 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,450 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.

Lawrence University Ranked 56th Nationally in U.S. News’ Annual “America’s Best Colleges” Guide

Lawrence University retained its standing as the top-ranked liberal arts college in Wisconsin in U.S. News & World Report’s 2013 “America’s Best Colleges” report.

Lawrence was ranked 56th nationally — up from 60th last year — among 239 national liberal arts colleges and universities.  Lawrence was the highest ranked college among eight Wisconsin institutions in the category.  Lawrence also was Wisconsin’s top-ranked college by Forbes in its college guide released last month.

U.S. News’ annual rankings are based on a combination of subjective information such as academic reputation (22.5%) and quantitative measures that education experts have proposed as reliable indicators of academic quality, including graduation and retention rates (20%), faculty resources (20%) student selectivity (15%) and alumni giving rates (5%), among others.

Lawrence showed improvement in several of the categories used in the ranking methodology including number of incoming students ranked in the top 10 percent of their high school class (46%), freshman retention rate (89%), graduation rate (77%), and acceptance rate (53%). Lawrence’s commitment to individualized learning and small classes was reflected in its high rate of classes with 20 students or fewer (75%), one of only 30 schools among the 239 in the category with that high of a percentage.

“It’s nice to be recognized by this ranking, especially for our individualized learning,” said Ken Anselment, dean of admissions and financial aid at Lawrence. “It would be even nicer if the magazine counted all of the one-on-one courses we do at Lawrence, of which there are many. It’s an essential point of distinction for us, but unfortunately, U.S. News only counts classes with enrollments of at least two.”

While the national recognition is appreciated, Anselment says families should consider all college guides as but one tool in their college selection process.

“College rankings value different things according to their own system. The best way to discover if a college matches with your values is to experience it yourself by engaging with it as much as possible before deciding to enroll.

“Regardless of how each service assembles its rankings,” he added, “Lawrence will continue doing what it does best: providing a transformative learning experience that educates students as unique individuals.”

In compiling its 2013 “America’s Best Colleges” guide, U.S. News & World Report evaluated nearly 1,500 of the nation’s public and private four-year schools, using data from up to 16 separate factors, each of which is assigned a “weight” that reflects the magazine editor’s judgment as to how much that measure matters.  Each school’s composite weighted score is then compared to peer institutions to determine final rankings.

Institutions are divided into several distinct categories. In addition to the best liberal arts college category that measures national institutions like Lawrence, other rankings are based on universities that grant master and doctorate degrees and colleges that are considered “regional” institutions.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2013 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,450 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.

Wisconsin Liberal Arts Colleges’ Collaborative Program Awarded $1.1 Million Grant

A highly successful and unique regional collaboration model between Lawrence University, Ripon College and St. Norbert College has been awarded a five-year, $1.1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education TRIO to support the schools’ Ronald E. McNair Post-baccalaureate Achievement Program.

The grant will support the McNair Achievement Program beginning in the fall of 2013 and running through Spring 2018. The program focuses on preparing first-generation, low-income and racially underrepresented students for graduate school and the completion of doctorate degrees.

Nancy Wall

“The McNair program helps level the playing field for students from less privileged backgrounds by providing exposure to, experience with, and support for graduate school,” said Nancy Wall, associate professor of biology and Lawrence’s campus coordinator for the program. “I think this is incredibly important because these students bring important and valuable perspectives that would not occur to students from more privileged backgrounds to the table.”

Dan Krhin, director of Student Support Services and McNair Scholars at Ripon, said the private liberal arts schools have a mission to educate everyone and the power of the consortium of the three schools makes it a stronger program.

“We are at a time in our country where we need more highly educated citizens, and we feel we are doing our part through the McNair Program to attain this goal,” said Krhin. “We have one of the more unique McNair models in the United States by combining three prestigious liberal arts institutions into one focused effort. All three schools contribute funding and institutional support to supplement the federal funding.”

The McNair Achievement Program currently is supported by a TRIO grant that runs through the 2012-13 academic year. According to Krhin, in the first four years of the current grant cycle, 40 students have been placed in graduate schools across the county, with 18 going directly into doctorate programs.

“The McNair Scholar’s Program has provided tangible support including financial aid for standardized testing and application fees, advice on the application and interviewing processes and preparatory guidance through my undergraduate education and research projects,” said 2009 Lawrence graduate Bryce Schuler, who is starting his fourth year as a combined Ph.D. and M.D. degree candidate at the Medical College and Graduate School of Wisconsin in Milwaukee.

“Not only have I benefitted from being a part of the McNair Program as an undergraduate student,” Schuler added, “but I also have been able to provide insight and support to other McNair scholars as a graduate student. As our program continues to grow and develop, these forms of assistance to McNair scholars will continue to increase.”

Alex Ajayi ’12

New York City native Alex Ajayi, who graduated with a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Lawrence in 2012, says only now is he beginning to fully grasp the program’s “profound value.”

“Beyond the many instrumental resources it provides students to prepare them for postgraduate education, the thing that has stuck with me the most is the recurring narrative that students can circumvent the limitations of their background and aspire far beyond their frame of reference,” said Ajayi, currently in his first year of a Ph.D. program in counseling psychology at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. “For students like me, who don’t have the precedence of doctoral education in my family, this program was a beacon of what was possible.”

Kevin Quinn, who coordinates the McNair Program at St. Norbert College, calls it “a life-changing opportunity for the students in it.”

“They are provided with great mentoring, financial support and solid guidance toward successful graduate school applications. Students entering the program not quite sure that they can measure up later find themselves opening up an acceptance letter from a grad program of their dreams.”

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2013 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,450 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.

Thought Into Action: Matriculation Convocation Opens Lawrence University’s 164th Academic Year

President Jill Beck

Under the theme “Thought into Action,” President Jill Beck opens Lawrence University’s 164th academic year and the 2012-13 convocation series Thursday, Sept. 13 with the annual matriculation address.

The convocation, at 11:10 a.m. in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel, is free and open to the public.  It will be Beck’s final matriculation convocation. In February she announced her plans to retire at the end of the 2012-13 academic year.

Named president in 2004, Beck is the college’s 15th — and only woman — president. In 2009, Forbes.com named Beck a “barrier breaker,” one of 15 female college presidents on Forbes’ list of America’s 50 Best Colleges. A native of Worcester, Mass., she earned a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and art history from Clark University, a master’s degree in history and music from McGill University, and the Ph.D. in theatre from City University of New York.

Kathrine Handford

Beck will be joined by Kathrine Handford, lecturer of music and university organist and award-winning filmmaker Catherine Tatge, artist-in-residence.

Catherine Tatge ’72

Handford presents “Connecting the Dots: An Organ Studio Transformed” that will focus on a trip she led last March to Paris with a half dozen student organ majors while Tatge will present “Telling Stories That Matter.”

As part of the convocation, a clip from a documentary film made about the trip to France, “A World of Sound: American Organists in Paris,” directed by 2012 Lawrence graduate Mark Hirsch will be shown, junior Mathias Reed will perform on Lawrence’s Brombaugh tracker organ and senior Alexis VanZalen will present the address “Music, Meaning, and My Experience with French Organ Culture.”

Other speakers on Lawrence’s 2012-13 convocation series include:

• Oct. 11, 2012 — Larry Robertson, award-winning author and founder of Lighthouse Consulting, which guides entrepreneurial ventures, their leaders, and those who invest in them.

• Jan. 24, 2013 — Lynda Barry, author and nationally syndicated cartoonist known for her comic strip “Ernie Pook’s Comeek” and the books “The Good Times are Killing Me” and “What It Is.

• April 16, 2013 — Bill Viola, contemporary video artist who explores New Media through electronic, sound, and image technology.

• May 23, 2013 — Claudena Skran, professor of government and Edwin and Ruth West Professor of Economics and Social Science at Lawrence.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2013 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,450 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.

Lawrence University — Once Again — Named a College That Changes Lives

For the third straight edition, Lawrence University once again is included in the latest version of the classic college guide “Colleges that Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About Colleges.”

The third edition of the book was released Aug. 28 and is currently available on newsstands, at bookstores and online.

Originally written in 1996 by Loren Pope, the former education editor of the New York Times and re-released in 2006, the 2012 edition is essentially a completely new book, updated by Denver-based education writer Hilary Masell Oswald, who conducted all new school tours and in-depth interviews in selecting the 40 colleges for inclusion. Pope passed away in 2008.

“Making it into the book is an even bigger deal for us this time around because both the writer and the process of review was different than it was for the first edition,” said Ken Anselment, dean of admissions and financial aid at Lawrence. “As a former college admission counselor herself, Ms. Oswald is in a unique position to assess and write about the colleges that were included in the book. She greatly impressed me with her intelligence and care for her subject matter.”

A non-profit organization of the same name was founded shortly after the book was first published to advance and support a student-centered college search process as an antidote to the high-stakes, high-stress environment often associated with the college search. The organization, which offers programs and college fairs to packed houses all over the country, focuses on helping individual students find a fit with the mission and identity of individual colleges.

“Both the book and the organization have great visibility and credibility among prospective students, their families and the college counseling community,” said Anselment. “One of the things the book dispels is the myth that selectivity in admissions means the same thing as quality in education. As its name implies, the Colleges That Change Lives excel at changing the trajectories of students’ lives.”

The book organized the 40 schools into five geographic regions — Northeast, South, Midwest, Southwest and Northwest.

In her revised edition, Oswald provides valuable information for prospective students on topics ranging from the look and feel of the campus and the quality of dining hall food to the percentage of students who study abroad or go to grad school and what professors have to say about their schools.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2013 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,450 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.

Lawrence University Political Scientist Sees “Generational” Matchup in U.S. Senate Race

Lawrence University political scientist Arnold Shober sees a “generational” political matchup this November in the race for Wisconsin’s U.S. Senate seat being vacated by retiring four-term Democrat Sen. Herb Kohl.

Shober says Tommy Thompson, a former four-term Republican governor, and Democrat Tammy Baldwin, who has represented Wisconsin’s 2nd Congressional District since 1999, not only represent different political “cultures,” but also face different challenges in this election.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2013 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,450 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.

 

 

Former U.S. Senator Russ Feingold Named Lawrence University Scarff Professor

Former U.S. Senator Russ Feingold will spend part of the Fall Term at Lawrence University as the college’s 2012-13 Stephen Edward Scarff Distinguished Visiting Professor.

The Scarff professorship was established in 1989 by Edward and Nancy Scarff in memory of their son, Stephen, a member of the Lawrence class of 1975, who died in an automobile accident in 1984. It brings civic leaders and scholars to Lawrence to provide broad perspectives on the central issues of the day.

Russ Feingold

Feingold received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from Lawrence in 2011 and spoke as part of the college’s 1994-95 convocation series.

During his Scarff appointment, Feingold will present guest lectures for the courses “Introduction to International Relations,” “International Politics” and others. He also will deliver a public address and participate in a weekend retreat with students at Björklunden, Lawrence’s 425-acre northern campus in Door County.

“We are extremely pleased that Senator Feingold will be able to offer his insights and wisdom directly to Lawrence’s students,” said Provost and Dean of the Faculty David Burrows. “His experience in government will complement our programs that stress the theoretical analysis of political systems with actual examples of how our politics works in contemporary life. His commitment to improving the living conditions of our citizens is a fine example of civic engagement and will serve as a helpful model for students, faculty and staff.”

One of Wisconsin’s highest-profile elected officials, Feingold spent 28 years in public service as both a three-time state senator (1982-92) and U.S. Senator (1994-2010). During his 18 years in Congress, Feingold established himself as one of the U.S. Senate’s most independent voices. He was the lone senator to vote against the Patriot Act in 2001, opposed President Obama’s decision to expand the war in Afghanistan, was the first senator to propose a timetable to exit Iraq and fought against NAFTA and other financial deregulation and trade agreements he considered unfair.

“I could not be more pleased to be working with the students at one of the great pillars of education in Wisconsin, one that has produced some of Wisconsin’s strongest civic leaders,” said Feingold.

In 2011, Feingold accepted a visiting professor appointment at Marquette University Law School to teach the courses “Current Legal Issues: The U.S. Senate” and “Jurisprudence.”

Feingold also was named the inaugural Mimi and Peter Haas Distinguished Visitor at Stanford University during the winter quarter of 2012 and will return to Stanford Law School to teach in 2013.

He is the author of the New York Times’ best-selling book “While America Sleeps,” which examines the challenges America faces as a nation since the 9/11 terrorist attacks. In 2011, Feingold founded Progressives United, a grassroots organization designed to counter corporate influence in politics.

A native of Janesville, Feingold graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1975 and earned a law degree in 1977 from Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar. He returned to the states and earned a law degree from Harvard Law School in 1979. Feingold practiced law in Madison from 1979-85.

Feingold is the 18th person named Lawrence’s Scarff Professor. Previous appointments include McGeorge Bundy, national security adviser to presidents Kennedy and Johnson; Rev. William Sloane Coffin, Jr., former chaplain at Yale University, noted civil rights advocate and peace activist; and Takakazu Kuriyama, former Japanese Ambassador to the U.S.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges by Forbes, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,450 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.

Faculty Teaching Excellence, Scholarship, Creativity Saluted at Commencement

Lawrence University recognized five faculty members Sunday, June 10 for teaching excellence, scholarship and creative activity at the college’s 163rd commencement.

Thomas Ryckman

Thomas Ryckman, professor of philosophy, received Lawrence’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, which recognizes outstanding performance in the teaching process, including the quest to ensure students reach their full development as individuals, human beings and future leaders of society.

A member of the faculty since 1984, Ryckman previously was recognized with the college’s Young Teacher Award (1986).  He is only the 10th faculty member to receive both teaching honors in the history of the awards.

During his Lawrence career, he has taught everything from introductory philosophy to courses in epistemology, logic and the philosophy of art. He has served as director of the Freshman Studies program (1989-91) as well as contributing to it as an instructor. He also was instrumental in launching Lawrence’s Senior Experience, directing the program from 2008-10.

In presenting Ryckman his award, Lawrence President Jill Beck praised him for employing humor, direct but appropriate prodding and thoughtful personal attention to ensure “students not only learn the material you present to them, but also become skillful independent learners capable of mastering anything new.”

“In all of your activities, you have remained dedicated to the ideal of liberal education. That dedication has benefitted our students for over 25 years,” said Beck.

Ryckman earned a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy at the University of Michigan and his master’s and doctorate degrees in philosophy at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

Peter Peregrine

Peter Peregrine, professor of anthropology, received the Award for Excellence in Scholarship, which honors a faculty member who has demonstrated sustained scholarly excellence for a number of years and whose work exemplifies the ideals of the teacher-scholar.

An archaeologist specializing in the evolution of complex societies, Peregrine joined the Lawrence faculty in 1995.

Last fall, he was elected a Fellow of the prestigious American Association for the Advancement of Science, which recognizes “meritorious efforts to advance science or its applications.” He is one of only two Lawrence anthropologists ever elected an AAAS Fellow. Earlier this month, Peregrine was named a member of the External Faculty of the Santa Fe Institute, joining an accomplished group of scholars that includes a Nobel Laureate, numerous National Academy members and two Pulitzer Prize winning authors.

In addition to an extensive list of book chapters and journal articles, Peregrine is the author of the book “Archaeology of the Mississippian Culture: A Research Guide.”

“The range of interests represented by your work is remarkable. You have published on physical anthropology and archeology, and also on cultural anthropology,” Beck said. “These areas are so diverse that you are virtually a one-person interdisciplinary program. But it is not primarily the quantity or your achievements that is so impressive. It is their excellence.”

Peregrine, who taught for five years in the anthropology department of Juniata College preior to Lawrence, earned his bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees from Purdue University.

John Shimon and Julie Lindemann

Associate Professors of Art Julie Lindemann and John Shimon received the Award for Excellence in Creative Activity.  Established in 2006, the award recognizes outstanding creative work for advancing Lawrence’s mission.

Collaborating photographers since the mid-1980s, Lindemann and Shimon have focused their cameras on the remote corners of the Midwest, particularly Wisconsin’s Manitowoc County.  Among their photographic projects are “Animal Husbandry,” “Midwestern Rebellion,” “Real Photo Postcard Survey,” “Go-Go Girls” and “Pictures of Non-Famous People.” Their 2004 boutique art book, “Season’s Gleamings: The Art of the Aluminum Christmas Tree,” a tribute to the 1960s shimmering holiday decoration, received national media attention, including a segment on “CBS Sunday Morning.”

Provost and Dean of the Faculty David Burrows cited Lindemann and Shimon’s work for creating photographs “that help us appreciate the complexities of human nature.”

“In addition to your brilliant use of photographic technology and your ability to relate to your subjects, one of the remarkable aspects of your work is its highly collaborative nature,” said Burrows. “You have worked together for many years, and clearly gain strength from each other. To experience your visual representations is to be inspired and intrigued. Your art transforms our understanding of human existence, and for that we are all grateful.”

Lindemann and Shimon joined the faculty in 2000 as part-time instructors before receiving a joint assistant professor appointment in 2005. They both earned bachelor’s degrees at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and master’s degrees from Illinois State University.

Violinist Samantha George, associate professor of music, received the Young Teacher Award in recognition of demonstrated excellence in the classroom and the promise of continued growth.

George was the associate concertmaster of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra for nine years before joining the Lawrence conservatory of music faculty in 2008.  Other previous appointments include assistant concertmaster of the Colorado Symphony, core concertmaster of the Hartford Symphony, and guest concertmaster posts with the Charleston Symphony and the Oregon Symphony.

Samantha George

Her solo career includes concert performances with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, Milwaukee Chamber Orchestra, Raleigh Symphony, Idaho State Civic Symphony, Hartford Symphony and the United States Coast Guard Band.

In presenting her award, Burrows praised George as “an inspiring, brilliant and thoughtful teacher.”

“A key part of your success is your ability to create a unique learning experience for each student,” said Burrows. “You are able to understand how each individual thinks and feels and you work to develop just the right lesson to bring out the best in that individual. Your experience as a soloist and associate concertmaster of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra allows you to give excellent advice on solo repertoire and orchestral music. Simply put, your teaching is outstanding.”

George earned bachelor and master’s degrees as well as a Performer’s Certificate degree from the Eastman School of Music. She also earned a doctorate in violin performance and music theory from the University of Connecticut.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges by Forbes, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.