Tag: City of Appleton

Upgrade of half-mile stretch of Lawrence’s Riverwalk Trail expected to begin next year

The section of the Riverwalk Trail behind Warch Campus Center, just east of Lawe Street, will be part of a trail upgrade project beginning in 2022. The project covers the half-mile stretch of trail that runs along the river on the south side of campus. (Photos by Danny Damiani)

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

Lawrence University will widen, pave, and light a campus trail that runs along the Fox River, with work on the project expected to begin in 2022.

The upgraded Riverwalk Trail will improve its year-round usability and allow the campus to better connect with adjacent trails for walking, running, and biking, said Christyn Abaray, assistant to the president.

Abaray called the project a significant benefit for the surrounding Appleton community as well as for the students, faculty, and staff who call the Lawrence campus home. It will further highlight Lawrence’s scenic location along the river, providing picturesque views, a natural get-away, fitness opportunities, and new avenues for environmental studies.

“A well-maintained path will increase experiential learning opportunities for students whose studies focus on the environment and public health and for our environmentally focused student organizations,” Abaray said. “And strengthening the connection between Lawrence and the city through contributions to the growth of the Fox Cities will help us to attract and retain talented students, faculty, and staff.”

The Riverwalk Trail between Drew Street and Lawe Street will be part of the planned upgrade that includes paving, widening, and lighting.

See more on trails and parks near the Lawrence campus here.

Fund-raising is already under way for the project. Philanthropic contributions from the Lawrence community have surpassed $150,000 so far. The Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region via its David L. and Rita E. Nelson Family Fund has pledged $100,000, and a $1,000 grant was secured from the Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin. Lawrence continues to work closely with the City of Appleton as the project proceeds with its support, Abaray said.

The half-mile trail along the south side of campus—from Drew Street to an area behind Warch Campus Center just east of Lawe Street—has been designated as an unofficial trail for decades. Lawrence paved part of the trail in the 1990s, courtesy of a gift from the Class of 1998, and a wooden overlook was built, but that overlook is now closed because of needed repairs. The overlook will be repaired in the future via this project, Abaray said.

Lawrence began working on trail-related enhancements a year ago. Two entryways connecting campus with the trail, one between Briggs Hall and the Buchanan Kiewit Wellness Center and one just east of the Warch Campus Center, were renovated last summer.

The enhancements have made both the trail and campus easier and safer to access, but the trail still lacks the amenities for more robust use, Abaray said.

“While campus and Appleton residents still enjoy the existing unofficial trail for its scenic views, its narrowness, lack of lighting, and unpaved portions make it difficult to utilize the trail safely and fully year-round,” she said.

Once the upgrades to the trail portion of the project are completed, the Riverwalk Trail will provide easy access to other nearby trails, including the newly opened Lawe Street Trestle Trail, the Newberry Trail, North Island Trail, and the coming trail that’s part of the planned Ellen Kort Peace Park.

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

Get out and explore: Our favorite trails, parks with easy access from campus

The North Island Trail is among the trails with quick and easy access from the Lawrence campus. (Photo by Danny Damiani)

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

Looking to enjoy the outdoors within walking distance of the Lawrence University campus?

Here are five trails—of various lengths, mostly along the beautiful Fox River—and four nearby parks. All have easy access from campus and are worth exploring any time of the year. (Note that this doesn’t include all of the exciting things to come, including a major upgrade of Lawrence’s own Riverwalk Trail between Lawe and Drew streets. Stay tuned; we’ll be sharing details soon.)

First, the trails for walking, running, or biking near campus:

Lawe Street Trestle Trail

(Photo by Danny Damiani)

This is the newest addition to the trail system that is near the Lawrence campus, having opened in September. The City of Appleton transformed the abandoned railroad trestle into a 10-foot-wide trail that spans the Fox River at the southern edge of campus. Complete with LED lighting, the trestle trail is 575 feet long. It stretches from Lawe Street south of the river to E. John Street on the north bank, and provides access to the North Island Trail—immediately across the river from the Lawrence campus—and the nearby Newberry Trail. From Lawrence, it’s easily accessible along Lawe Street, south of the Warch Campus Center, and along E. John Street, just east of campus.

Newberry Trail

(Photo by Danny Damiani)

A beautiful stretch of trail, Newberry Trail runs 2.4 miles along the Fox River. It’s easily accessible from campus along Lawe Street, cutting through wooded property and providing gorgeous river views. Photo opportunities are plentiful. To the east, the trail connects with Telulah Park and then the CE Trail. To the west, it connects to S. Olde Oneida Street and the refurbished industrial flats.

CE Trail

(Photo by Danny Damiani)

This trail features more than six miles of dedicated asphalt running along County CE from the east side of Appleton to Kaukauna. It can be accessed from campus by following the Newberry Trail to the east. Once you pass Telulah Park, the trail will cut through a neighborhood before beginning its long stretch running parallel with the county highway. Plenty of open country and scenic stops along the way, as well as trail access to a bike shop for any repair or refueling needs. A recent addition to the trail on the Kaukauna end provides improved access to the Fox River Trail, which extends north to Green Bay.

North Island Trail

(Photo by Danny Damiani)

This trail is a nearly half-mile loop immediately across the Fox River from the Lawrence campus. It’s an easy connection to the Newberry Trail and provides gorgeous views of the campus from across the river. Great spots for scenic pics of campus. And perfect for that mid-day walk-and-talk.

Peabody Park Trail

(Photo by Danny Damiani)

A nearly half-mile trail that runs through Peabody Park and connects to Rankin Street and Wisconsin Avenue to the north. It’s a short trail, but it’s a handy and scenic connection if you want to visit the part of the city that includes the spacious and beautiful Riverside Cemetery and the Refuge Foundation for the Arts, a nonprofit artistic haven operated out of a converted monastery that often partners with Lawrence’s Conservatory of Music. You can connect to the trail at Peabody Park, which is located along the river less than a mile north of campus, along N. Green Bay Road.

Quick note: There are many other trails in the area. We’re highlighting only those with close proximity to campus. To see a map of all of the Fox Cities trails, go here.

Did you know? Fox Valley groups and municipalities are planning $24 million worth of trail upgrades between now and 2025. See details on plans here, courtesy of the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region.

And now four parks within an easy walk from campus:

City Park

(Photo by Liz Boutelle)

This eight-acre park is almost an extension of the Lawrence campus. It’s located immediately north of campus and is home to numerous annual festivals and art fairs. It features a beautiful fountain adorned with a sculpture of dancing children. It’s surrounded by historic homes that make up the City Park Historic District.

Jones Park

(Photo by Liz Boutelle)

Located a few blocks west of campus, this park is built in a ravine on the south edge of the city’s downtown. It recently underwent a major renovation, reopening in the summer of 2019. It’s nestled against the Fox Cities Exhibition Center and features, among other amenities, a large amphitheater. Look for live music and festival opportunities in the spring, summer, and fall and ice skating in the winter.  

Telulah Park

(Photo by Liz Boutelle)

At 38 acres, this is Appleton’s second largest park. It’s located a mile from campus. A trail along the river, which allows for fishing opportunities and a kayak launch, connects to the Newberry Trail. The park includes a skate park and a disc golf course, among other amenities. There are two easy routes from campus to get there: Walk or bike across the College Avenue bridge and hang a left on Walter Avenue or head south on Lawe Street and take the Newberry Trail to the east.

Peabody Park

(Photo by Danny Damiani)

This park, one of Appleton’s oldest, stretches from the river up through a beautiful ravine. It’s accessible from campus by a short, scenic walk or ride to the north along N. Green Bay Road. It’s a great day-trip get-away within a mile of campus.

More parks to visit: These are our favorites, but there are other beautiful Appleton parks to explore not far from campus. Check out information on Lutz Park, Pierce Park, Arbutus Park, and others here.

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

Let’s explore: Checking out 17 pieces of public art on or near campus

Aerial Landscape, located adjacent to the Wriston Art Center on the Lawrence University campus, is among the pieces of public art on display on or near campus. Check out our list. (Photos by Luke Le ’22)

Story by Lili “Shirley” Xu ’22

Take a walk across the Lawrence University campus and along College Avenue and you will find a diverse range of public art pieces that are part of Appleton’s downtown.

From murals to sculptures to poetry engraved in the sidewalk, you’ll find art in unexpected places. Some pieces have rich backgrounds and others connect to traditions that define Appleton, in all its uniqueness. Next time you’re taking a stroll on or near campus, check out these 17 pieces or projects to enjoy the artistic grooves of Appleton.  

1. Aerial Landscape sculpture, across from Wellness Center  

(Photo by Danny Damiani)

By the late Rolf Westphal, Lawrence’s first Frederick R. Layton Distinguished Visiting Professor in Studio Art, Aerial Landscape can be found on campus outside the Wriston Art Center. Originally installed in 1988, this bright trio of yellow arched structures have become a recognizable landmark on campus—and honestly, the upside-down LU is more iconic for Lawrentians than the McDonald’s yellow arches. For more on art and art history at Lawrence, see here. 

2. Indigenize Education mural, on side of Wellness Center 

Having indigenous representation on a college campus is a huge and necessary step in acknowledging our own history. The Indigenize Education mural on the north exterior wall of the Buchanan Kiewit Wellness Center is part of Matika Wilbur’s Project 562—a project that aims to create positive indigenous role models through artistic representations to counteract stereotypes about Native Americans in the mainstream media. This non-permanent wheatpaste mural is a reminder for us to truthfully embrace who we are and encourage us to make sure everyone’s story gets told. 

3. The Merrill Hall Sundial, Main Hall  

On the south side of Main Hall, you’ll find a sundial adorning the building above the stairs. Milwaukee-Downer College and Lawrence College merged in 1964 to form Lawrence University, and the Merrill Hall Sundial was transferred to Lawrence in 1973 as a gift from the Milwaukee-Downer class of 1932. This sundial was formally installed and dedicated on the south face of Main Hall in 1975. Plus, it offers a built-in timestamp in your photos.  

4. Hawthornden, outside of Colman Hall 

A beloved grove of Hawthorn trees from Milwaukee-Downer College, known as Hawthornden, has been recreated near Colman Hall together with a statue of a young woman sitting in grass and dressed in 1890s attire. The class of 1961 helped plant the trees, designed the statue and commissioned it as a memory of Milwaukee-Downer College.  

5. Kimball Alley mural, across from Colman Hall 

Located across from the main entrance of Colman Hall (and behind Brokaw Hall), the black and white lines swirl and densify themselves to create many abstract shapes. The other black and white mural shows the skeletons inside a flying creature’s silhouette. They bring so many dynamics to the gray and boring backgrounds in a lesser known corner of campus.  

6. After the Storm, in green space north of Brokaw Hall

Created by sculptor Anthony Heinz May as a part of Sculpture Valley’s Acre of Art, After the Storm is a representation of reform after a disaster. Installed in August 2019 near the intersection where downtown Appleton meets the Lawrence campus, a tree formed of cubes represents the discomfort and displacement after our fights against nature. The branches twist and soar in the sky, symbolizing nature’s consequence to humans’ acts of over-exhausting it—a lesson we should all take to heart.  

7. The Alley Project, west side of History Museum at the Castle 

Across College Avenue from the Taste of Thai restaurant, the west side wall of the History Museum at the Castle is painted, courtesy of Chad Brady. Blocks of vibrant colors and the theme of badgers bicycling celebrates Appleton’s active living style. This mural adds energy to the annual Mile of Music Festival and re-energizes any student making their way to a downtown coffee shop to cram for finals.  

8. Heid Music murals, back and side doors of Heid Music  

Near Heid Music, a music instrument and accessories store a block west of campus on College Avenue, there are two murals. One contains black-and-white silhouettes of different musicians, with a hint of blue. The other one paints a colorful tropical garden where plants are enjoying a music festival. They are really visible and universally recognized by Lawrentians.  

9. Compassion Project manhole covers, various locations along College Avenue 

Designing manhole covers and installing them on the sidewalks was inspired by the community-wide Compassion Project. Led by Lawrence’s Frederick R. Layton Professor of Studio Art Rob Neilson in 2011, Lawrence students were asked to express what compassion means to them via their artwork. It was part of a larger effort that included young students across Appleton using art to explore compassion. For the Lawrence creations, Neenah Foundry helped facilitate and install these customized covers along College Avenue. There is even one compassion manhole in front of the Warch Campus Center. Look around at how unique they are. It will change the way you see manhole covers.  

10. The Fire mural, near The Fire pottery studio 

The Fire is a pottery, mosaic, and glass-fusing studio on College Avenue a block off campus. It features a cool blue background with two phoenix-like birds, one red and the other made of abstract yellow-brown blocks; swirls in the background and the shape of the birds’ wings add motion and excitement. They make you want to go into the store to explore your own artistic potential.  

11. Traffic Box Art Project, various locations throughout Appleton 

Highlighting the stories of diverse populations and their culture, the Traffic Box Art Project involves the collective actions from youth and community partners to paint a more colorful Appleton. Installed in July 2016, the 16 traffic control boxes are scattered around downtown Appleton. Take a walk to look at the stories on the colorful boxes, all located near traffic lights.  

12. Mile of Music mural, corner of College Avenue and State Street 

Nothing defines summer in Appleton better than Mile of Music. Each August, the four-day all-original music festival attracts about 80,000 people to enjoy live music and hands-on workshops, including some led by Lawrentians. Chad Brady painted this mural, located at the corner of College Avenue and State Street, seven blocks west of campus, during the summer of 2019 to commemorate Mile of Music. The cool blues and light yellow-browns, plus hints of purple, makes it seem like you’re watching the sun set in real time.  

13. For Us mural, Houdini Plaza 

For Us is a must-see mural that went up earlier this summer in downtown Appleton. Inspired by the protests following George Floyd’s death, this mural is meant to spread love, peace, and positivity. Painted by Irineo Medina in June, For Us aims to amplify the voices of minorities and offer support via art. This mural is located across from Houdini Plaza, the centerpiece of downtown Appleton and the gathering spot for a number of recent racial injustice protests.  

14. McFleshman’s Brewing Co. mural, 115 S. State St.

This is another work by Chad Brady, painted on the wall of McFleshman’s Brewing Co.’s beer garden. The owner of McFleshman’s (Hint, the owner has a strong LU connection) commissioned this mural to “Rock the Vote” before the 2016 presidential primary. The cool tone and the bold David Bowie portrait are so catchy that you will not miss it.  

15. Sidewalk poetry 

Transforming Appleton into an open poetry book, the sidewalk poems make you look down on the sidewalks so that your mind can wander to another realm for a little bit through poetry. Poems are selected from submissions by residents of Appleton each year to be carved into the sidewalks. The poem you are reading might come from a fifth grader; how cool is that?  

16. Muncheez mural, 600 W. College Ave. 

Located by the beloved Muncheez Pizzeria, the mural paints stories about aliens. Yes, you read that right. The starry black background adds a mysterious atmosphere to the scenes of flying pizzas, rabbits eating pizzas, and the alien ship trying to steal our cows.

17. The Collective, west end of the E. College Avenue bridge  

The Collective also is part of Sculpture Valley’s Acre of Art. Many empty propane tanks have been used to create faces that together make up a big head sculpture located at the west end of the bridge on E. College Avenue, just a few steps east of the Lawrence campus. Take a walk around it to see faces of past and present friends and supporters of the sculptor, Paul Bobrowitz, who has said: “The collective unconsciousness is the major source of my inspiration, energy, and solutions. Everyone I have encountered form a collective.” Since this sculpture has been a little divisive, check it out while you can when taking a walk along the beautiful Fox River.  

_ _ _

This isn’t a list of all of the public art in Appleton, just favorites on or near the Lawrence campus. Some of the sculptures change periodically, so there is often something new to explore. The fresh pieces, along with some traditional art projects, show Appleton as an innovative, exciting, and tight-knit community. Know other public art pieces you really like in Appleton? Next time you spot your favorite, grab a picture and tag us on Instagram @lawrenceuni! 

Lili “Shirley” Xu ’22 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Lawe Street Trestle Trail, opening in early August, adds to trails near campus

The Lawe Street Trestle Trail, just south of campus, will open in early August. (Photos by Danny Damiani)

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

The City of Appleton’s new Lawe Street Trestle Trail is about to open, marking the latest step forward in the development of beautiful trails and parks near the city’s downtown and the Lawrence University campus.

The abandoned railroad trestle has been transformed into a 10-foot-wide trail that spans the Fox River at the southern edge of campus. Part of a $1 million-plus city investment, the trail is nearing completion and is expected to open to the public in early August.

“The City of Appleton has been working with CN Railroad for over 10 years in an effort to acquire the trestle to expand our riverfront trail system and to provide a trail connection to both sides of the river,” said Dean Gazza, the city’s director of parks, recreation, and facilities management.

The trestle trail, complete with LED lighting, is 575 feet long, with composite plank decking. There are two cantilevered scenic overlooks in the middle. The trestle is 14 feet wide; the asphalt trail 10 feet wide. It stretches from Lawe Street south of the river to E. John Street on the north bank, providing access to the North Island Trail – immediately across the river from the Lawrence campus – and the nearby Newberry Trail.

From Lawrence, the new trestle trail is easily accessible along Lawe Street, south of the Warch Campus Center, and along E. John Street, just east of campus.

In addition to connecting with other trails, it provides an alternate way to access the city’s downtown district. It’s an important piece of development along the river that, according to city plans, will soon include the riverside Ellen Kort Peace Park and the nearby Edison Trestle Trail, both expected to be developed over the next two years.

It all adds to the amenities surrounding the Lawrence campus, itself a signature piece of the Appleton landscape, anchoring the east end of the downtown.

Appleton features 29 parks (and a 30th in development) as well as numerous other hiking and biking trails.

See map of Fox Cities trails here.

Besides the new Lawe Street Trestle Trail, here are four trails and four parks near campus worth checking out on foot or bike:

1. Newberry Trail

A beautiful stretch of trail, arguably the most popular in the city, Newberry Trail runs 2.4 miles along the Fox River. It’s easily accessible from campus along Lawe Street, cutting through wooded property and providing gorgeous river views. Photo opportunities are plentiful. To the east, the trail connects with Telulah Park and then the CE Trail. To the west, it connects to S. Olde Oneida Street and the refurbished industrial flats.

2. CE Trail

This trail features six miles of dedicated asphalt running alongside County CE from the east side of Appleton to Kaukauna. It can be accessed from campus by following the Newberry Trail to the east. Once you pass Telulah Park, the trail will cut through the east side of Appleton before beginning its long stretch running parallel with the county highway. Plenty of open country and scenic stops along the way, as well as trail access to a bike shop for any repair or refueling needs.

3. North Island Trail

This trail is a nearly half-mile loop immediately across the Fox River from the Lawrence campus. It’s an easy connection to the Newberry Trail and provides gorgeous views of the campus from across the river. Great spots for scenic pics of campus.

4. Peabody Park Trail

A nearly half-mile trail that runs through Peabody Park and connects to Rankin Street and Wisconsin Avenue to the north. It’s a short trail, but it’s a handy and scenic connection if you want to visit the part of the city that includes the spacious and beautiful Riverside Cemetery and the Refuge Foundation for the Arts, a nonprofit artistic haven operated out of a converted monastery that often partners with Lawrence’s Conservatory of Music. You can connect to the trail at Peabody Park, which is located along the river less than a mile north of campus, along N. Green Bay Road.

1. City Park

This eight-acre park is almost an extension of the Lawrence campus. It’s located immediately north of campus and is home to numerous annual festivals and art fairs. It features a beautiful fountain adorned with a sculpture of dancing children. It’s surrounded by historic homes that make up the City Park Historic District.

2. Jones Park

Located a few blocks west of campus, this park is built in a ravine on the south edge of the city’s downtown. It recently underwent a major renovation, reopening in the summer of 2019. It’s nestled against the Fox Cities Exhibition Center and features, among other amenities, a large amphitheater. Look for live music and festival opportunities in the spring, summer, and fall and ice skating in the winter.  

3. Telulah Park

At 38 acres, this is Appleton’s second largest park. It’s located a mile from campus. A trail along the river, which allows for fishing opportunities and a kayak launch, connects to the Newberry Trail. The park includes a skate park and a disc golf course, among other amenities. There are two easy routes from campus to get there: Walk or bike across the College Avenue bridge and hang a left on Walter Avenue or head south on Lawe Street and take the Newberry Trail to the east.

4. Peabody Park

This park, one of Appleton’s oldest, stretches from the river up through a beautiful ravine. It’s accessible from campus by a short, scenic walk or ride to the north along N. Green Bay Road. It’s a great day-trip get-away within a mile of campus.

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

Woodford’s path to Appleton’s City Hall paved with lessons from Lawrence

Jake Woodford ’13 will be sworn in as Appleton’s mayor on April 21.

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

Lessons in leadership have been plentiful over the last 11 years for Jake Woodford ’13, Appleton’s mayor-elect.

From his time as president of the Lawrence University Community Council (LUCC) as an undergraduate to his work at Lawrence the past seven years as secretary to the Board of Trustees and assistant to the president, Woodford has been a voice of insight, intellect, and reason on a myriad of issues impacting Lawrence and the city.

When the ballots in the Appleton mayoral race were counted Monday, nearly a week after the April 7 election, the 29-year-old Woodford was elected to a four-year term, garnering 54% of the vote. He will be sworn in April 21 and will succeed Tim Hanna, who has served as Appleton’s mayor for 24 years.

“I’m so grateful for the incredible support my campaign has had from not only the Appleton community but also members of the Lawrence community,” Woodford said.

It was in the fall of 2009 that Woodford, who grew up in Appleton, walked onto the Lawrence campus as a first-year student. He declared government as his major and never looked back.

“It was an area of passion for me,” he said.

It’s a passion that would grow over the next four years, blossoming in many ways as he forged his own academic path and worked to strengthen and enhance the Lawrence experience for his classmates and those to come. In addition to his classroom work, he would serve in multiple student leadership roles and would be elected president of the LUCC, a student governing organization that’s an integral part of shared governance at Lawrence.

“It really was a living lab for me in terms of leadership — elected leadership and also in terms of management,” Woodford said of his undergrad experience.

He would walk off the Commencement stage in 2013 and into an important role in the president’s office, one that had him in frequent collaborations with the City of Appleton and other regional government bodies on issues ranging from mobility studies to infrastructure development. It would all prove to be preparation for his entry into elected office.

Woodford delivered a letter of resignation to Lawrence President Mark Burstein on Tuesday morning, 10 hours after being declared the mayoral victor. He called it a “bittersweet moment.” For Burstein, it was a moment of deep Lawrentian pride.

“Many Lawrentians are called to public service and to roles that have direct impact on their communities,” Burstein said. “It has been a pleasure to watch Jake’s energy turn toward the city he loves. I know the mayor-elect will lead us into a great future.”

Woodford will assume Appleton’s top leadership position at a time of great uncertainty with the COVID-19 pandemic. His Monday night victory came amid the state’s safer-at-home orders and pleas for social distancing, leaving him to do media interviews in his driveway instead of at a packed victory party.

What comes next for Appleton and other communities navigating the fallout from the pandemic has yet to be written. But Woodford is confident the lessons learned at Lawrence over the past 11 years will serve him well.

“This is a complicated time to be taking office, but I feel well prepared for this work,” he said. “I feel well prepared for adjusting to the times and facing the challenges we face, and I credit a lot of that to the Lawrence education that I have, this education that has prepared me to think critically and to be able to adjust to the situations that I face and the circumstances as they change. And to be grounded in values, values of community and of building a community that can be home for all people.”

Appleton and Lawrence have long had a collaborative relationship. Their histories are closely intertwined and the health of one is critical to the health of the other. Burstein noted those ties as he applauded the passing of the city’s leadership torch from Hanna to Woodford.

“I also want to thank Mayor Hanna for his efforts to foster a more inclusive Appleton with a vibrant economic base, safe environment, and bustling downtown,” Burstein said. “Even though our aims have differed at times, we have always found a way to work together to improve the quality of life for the people we serve. I hope to have the same relationship with Mayor Woodford.”

As Woodford prepares to become the top elected official in the city that Lawrence calls home, he points to mentorship from Burstein and other campus leaders as key to his preparation for a leap into public office. Those are lessons he’ll lean into as he manages a city with more than 74,000 residents.

“The thing I’ve always been struck by about Lawrence is that it’s a place where people are treated with respect and trusted to do their work, trusted to lead,” Woodford said. “I went from being a student at the university to being a colleague, and to being a senior leader at the institution, and I always felt respected and supported and mentored by my colleagues, by the faculty, and that’s been such an important part of my Lawrence experience.”

Next stop, City Hall.

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu