Tag: jobstrategies

Career Paths for Generation “I”

A new career survey by Adecco Group provides a picture of the career trajectories and expectations of 22-26 year-old recent college graduates. The group dubs this population Generation “I” because people in this age group have a secure understanding of who they are and what they want – and won’t compromise to get it. Check out some these interesting findings from the survey…

Want more? Check out the article here.


Job and Internship Application Tips

Life after Lawrence can be scary, whether we’re talking about after graduation or just following Spring Term. Below is some advice to help you secure a position that you’re happy with once you leave campus.

Set goals. No, I don’t just mean the obvious goal of getting job. When you’re searching for a position it’s important to have quantifiable, defined goals so you can stay on the right track. This may mean that you want to check a certain number job-posting websites per day or send out so many resumes to employers per week. Taking these steps and keeping track of what you’ve done can also help keep you from feeling discouraged.

Pay attention to quality over quantity. While it’s important to get your resume out to a fair number of prospective employers, remember that it is also vital to send documents that you’re proud of – as these are the first introduction to you that employers will get. This means that should tweak your resume and cover letter a little bit so that they are relevant to each position for which you apply.

Follow up with employers you’ve contacted. Once you’ve updated your documents and sent them out, be sure to follow up on them a week or two later if you haven’t heard much in response. Doing so can show employers that you really are interested in the position you applied for and can keep you on their radar if your resume was accidently pushed to the bottom of the stack.

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Recruiter Pet Peeves

Original article by Lindsay Pollak can be found here.

It’s that time of year again: students are busy applying for jobs and internships that will be waiting for them once school lets out. While it’s very important you take the right steps during the application process, there are also some things you should avoid doing in order to increase your chances of getting the position you want. Below are a few pet peeves expressed by recruiters about entry-level candidates.

1. Not doing your homework. There really is no excuse for not learning as much information about a company as possible before meeting a representative at a job fair, information session, or other recruiting event. Simply visit their website or do a quick Google search. Asking a recruiter a general question about what the company does is a quick way to fall off their list.

2. “Just following up.” There is a fine line between appropriate persistence and pointless pestering. It is absolutely fine to call or email a recruiter to say thank you for a company information session, to ask a few questions, or to mention that you’ll be attending another event they are hosting. But “Just calling to follow up!” doesn’t add much to your candidacy.

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4 Tips for Marketing Your Liberal Arts Degree

It’s no secret that liberal arts colleges prepare students differently for their careers than other kinds of schools. Maybe that’s the very reason you chose to attend Lawrence in the first place. But does getting your degree from a liberal arts school put you at a disadvantage in the job market?

According to a report from the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) in November 2010, “liberal arts graduates receive fewer offers, less compelling offers, and at dramatically lower compensation levels.”

So, does this mean that you should drop your double major and head to an engineering school if you hope to get a good job someday? Definitely not. Instead, it’s important to learn how to effectively market yourself and the great things about your liberal arts education that will help you stand out from the rest of an applicant pool.

Here are four steps you can take to help you do just that…

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Salary Negotiations: The Initial Offer and Your Response

When negotiating salary or other benefit, you are also negotiating the foundation of a relationship, so you want to get off on the right foot. You and the employer must come to an agreement that you both feel is fair. Here are some tips and rules to keep in mind when talking about salaries and benefits.

The following are the best steps to take when negotiation begins:
1. Do not negotiate until you have an offer in writing. Let the employer go first with the offer. However, if they ask you first, tell them your salary range (that you determined with the Considerations in this handout).
2. Restate their offer, and then process it. Keep an honest yet non-emotional response (including body language) based on your research. So, if it is less than you expect, indicate that it is lower than you expected per your research. Be prepared to verify the sources of your research.
3. Counteroffer with your research-based response and desired range. Remain objective, optimistic, and polite.
4. Never accept an offer right then and there. Ask when they need to know your decision. A respectable company does not ask you to respond immediately.

If you have multiple job offers, you can sharpen your negotiation skills. Practice with a company you are indifferent about working for. If you are feeling confident, try for the company with the best offer. Remember, if they are negotiating, then you are the leading candidate. Use this power to your advantage.

Sources: Sweet Careers Consulting, MJW Careers

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Positive Job Outlook for Graduating Seniors

According to The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) research report “Job Outlook 2011”, the prospects for college graduates looking for a job have improved. The organizations who responded to the survey reported that they plan to hire 13.5% more workers with bachelor’s degrees from the Class of 2011 than they did from the Class of 2010. Continue reading Positive Job Outlook for Graduating Seniors