Tag: acoustics

Kenneth Bozeman examines the role of voice in annual Honors Convocation

Music professor Kenneth Bozeman examines the role voice plays in forming connections, relationships and social structures in Lawrence University’s annual Honors Convocation.

Ken Bozeman
Kenneth Bozeman

Bozeman, the Frank C. Shattuck Professor of Music, presents “Voice, the Muscle of the Soul: Finding Yourself Through Finding Your Voice,” Tuesday, May 22 at 11:10 a.m. in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel. The event is free and open to the public and also will be available via live webcast at livestream.com/LawrenceUniversity.

The Honors Convocation publicly recognizes students and faculty recipients of awards and prizes for excellence in the arts, humanities, sciences, social sciences, languages and music as well as demonstrated excellence in athletics and service to others. Bozeman was chosen as the  speaker as the recipient of Lawrence’s Faculty Convocation Award, which honors a faculty member for distinguished professional work. He is the ninth faculty member so honored.

According to Bozeman, a person’s voice is a kind of audible fingerprint, helping define who we are and of who we perceive ourselves to be.  Beginning with the first breath immediately after birth, humans are hard-wired to express feelings and needs primarily through voice. It is strongly associated with personal identity. The process of developing one’s voice and the ability to express one’s deepest feelings and convictions through voice is a process of self-discovery and self-formation.

A member of the faculty since 1977, Bozeman began his career teaching teaching voice science and pedagogy. He is the author of two books, “Practical Vocal Acoustics: Pedagogic Applications for Teachers and  Singers”  and “Kinesthetic Voice Pedagogy: Motivating Acoustic Efficiency.” He was awarded the Van Lawrence Fellowship by the Voice Foundation in 1994 for his interest in voice science and pedagogy and serves as the chair of the editorial board of the Journal of Singing.

He has been recognized with both of Lawrence’s teaching honors, the Young Teacher Award in 1980 and the Excellence in Teaching Award in 1996.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Voice teacher Ken Bozeman releases second book on vocal pedagogy

In a follow-up to his 2013 book “Practical Vocal Acoustics,” Lawrence University Voice Professor Kenneth Bozeman has written a second book designed to help voice instructors better teach their craft.

A photo of the cover of the book "Kinesthetic Voice Pedagogy" by Lawrence University Voice Professor Kenneth W. BozemanFeaturing more studio applications of the principles he outlined in his first book, Bozeman’s just-published “Kinesthetic Voice Pedagogy: Motivating Acoustic Efficiency” explores the science behind harmonics, vowel perception and formant tuning while providing insights on how best to teach those concepts by using kinestetic, visual and physiological approaches.

Topics examined in the book include remapping the open throat, sensation migration across range and comparisons of treble and non-treble voice training.

In July (16-21), Bozeman will co-lead a seminar on topics covered in both books  with Ian Howell of the New England Conservatory at Bjorklunden, Lawrence’s northern campus in Door County.

The seminar is designed for voice teachers of high school, college or adult students; college voice majors and voice students who are graduate performance or vocal pedagogy majors; choral conductors who incorporate vocal training in their rehearsals and voice therapists specializing in the rehabilitation of singers.

A Head shot of Lawrence University Voice Professor Kenneth W. Bozeman.
Kenneth Bozeman

The Frank C. Shattuck Professor of Music at Lawrence, Bozeman is the chair of the voice department, where he teaches voice and voice science and pedagogy. He is a frequent presenter on voice acoustics at national conferences and association meetings and currently serves as chair of the editorial board of the Journal of Singing, the national publication of the National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS).

Bozeman joined the Lawrence conservatory faculty in 1977. A tenor, he has performed with the Milwaukee Symphony, the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra and the Louisville Bach Society, among others.

He earned performance degrees from Baylor University and the University of Arizona. He also studied at the State Conservatory of Music in Munich, Germany on a fellowship from Rotary International.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Book by Voice Professor Kenneth Bozeman Provides Vocal Acoustic Principles for Teachers, Singers

For more than 30 years, Lawrence University Professor of Music Kenneth Bozeman has studied the relationship between singing and vocal acoustics.

acoustics.inddThe long-time voice teacher in Lawrence’s conservatory of music has turned that research into the 16-chapter book “Practical Vocal Acoustics: Pedagogic Applications for Teachers and Singers” (Pendragon Press), a methodical approach designed to help voice teachers better apply the principles of vocal acoustics to their instruction. The book is available through Pendragon Press and Amazon.com.

“There are many important facets to a comprehensive pedagogy and the acoustic piece is but one,” said Bozeman, who holds the Frank C. Shattuck Professorship in Music. “However, due to our increasing knowledge of the effects of vocal tract resonances on vocal fold function, and of how awareness and anticipation of those effects can make our teaching more effective, there is a rapidly growing interest among voice teachers in mastering the basic acoustic principles involved.”

In his book, Bozeman provides a general understanding of acoustics, explains how harmonics and formants interact to create resonance and offers specific science-based exercises. He also provides perspective on two software programs — Madde voice synthesizer and VoceVista — outlining the strengths and limitations of each.

Christian Herbst, contributing author to the “Oxford Handbook of Singing” and a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Voice, Logopedics and Phoniatrics and Vocology, hailed Bozeman for succeeding “in condensing state of the art voice science into a well-digestible and concise tutorial.”

“With its solid scientific background, ‘Practical Vocal Acoustics’ helps to establish a modern approach in teaching how to sing: less myth and more facts,” said Herbst.

Ken-Bozeman_newsblog2
Voice Professor Kenneth Bozeman

Bozeman will teach a seminar at Bjorklunden, Lawrence’s northern campus, next summer (July 19-24, 2015) based on the principles in his book.

A member of the Lawrence faculty since 1977, Bozeman is chair of the voice department, teaching voice, voice science and pedagogy. He also serves as chair of the editorial board of the National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) Journal of Singing. He has been recognized with both of Lawrence’s teaching awards — the Young Teacher Award in 1980 and the Excellence in Teaching Award in 1996 — and his students have sung with the Metropolitan Opera, Houston Grand Opera, Boston Lyric Opera, Deutsche Oper Berlin and San Francisco Opera, among others.

Last summer, Bozeman was honored as one of only four master teachers selected for the (NATS) Intern Program, a national mentoring program in which master teachers spend two weeks working with select younger teachers in vocal pedagogy.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.