Tag: Lawrence students

Right at home: Discovering the joys of an (almost) endless Appleton summer

Lawrence University students, from left, Awa Badiane ’21, Carly Beyer ’21, and Chris James ’21 shop at the Downtown Appleton Farm Market on a recent Saturday morning.

Story by Awa Badiane ’21

After finals are done, dorm rooms are packed and the academic year has come to an end, most Lawrence University students go home for the summer. However, there are always some students who decide to stay and take advantage of amazing opportunities — whether it be conducting research with a professor, interning at one of the campus offices, or finding an off-campus job in Appleton.

For those who stay, it’s a chance to experience campus at a slower pace and to see Appleton in a way that just doesn’t happen during the academic year.

I’ve been one of the 146 students who stayed on campus all summer, calling Colman Hall home. I’m a government major from New York who is working as a student writer in the Communications office. I talked with other students who have been here this summer about the Appleton experience.

Spoiler alert: We love it.

Fun in Appleton  

When students are here during the school year, they get so caught up in the abundance of things going on on-campus they rarely get to enjoy the many things Appleton has to offer. With gorgeous weather (usually) and not having classes to worry about, summers at Lawrence give students a chance to do just that.

“This year was my first time at the Mile of Music festival, and it was so much fun,” said Shonell Benjamin ’20. “It was really nice getting to see Appleton come alive the way it did, and the performances I got to see were great.”  

Mile of Music is an Appleton tradition — seven years and running — that many students do not get a chance to experience because it happens during the summer. Over the course of four days in early August, the downtown is filled with live music, all original, with more than 900 performances taking place in 70 venues along a mile stretch of College Avenue. In addition, nearly 50 music education workshops take place, allowing festival-goers to get interactive instruction in diverse forms of music and dance, many of the sessions hosted by Lawrence Conservatory faculty or alumni.

“I got to go to all the Music Education events,” said Thuy Tien Tran ’20, who is majoring in film studies and economics and stayed this summer to work on video projects in the Communications office. “I got to see a lot of great artists from Lawrence. They shared their experience from during their time at Lawrence and how they use that to help other people.” 

Mile of Music, of course, is not the only thing Appleton’s downtown has to offer during the summer months. There’s a myriad of small shops, art studios, restaurants, coffee shops and bars, a weekly Thursday night concert in Houdini Plaza, and every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., the downtown strip gets blocked off and is used for the Downtown Appleton Farm Market.   

“As long as I’ve been here on the weekends, I’ve gone to the farmers market and got stuff for dinner,” said Isabella Mariani ’21, who is studying French, with an English minor, and is working as a student writer in the Communications office. 

With more than 150 vendors selling fresh fruit, vegetables, cheese, meats, baked goods, and other specialty items, the farm market is a beautiful thing, and it’s just steps off of the Lawrence campus.  

“I love the farmers market,” said Briana Wilson ’21, a biology major. “I remember when I went a few weeks ago there was a tornado warning, but the vendors were still set up and people were still shopping. Everyone was just having too much fun to stop.”  

Well, the storm did eventually bring the market to an abrupt stop that morning, but point well taken. The farm market is a must visit if you’re staying on campus for the summer.

Trying something new 

Most students stay on campus because they’ve found an opportunity that allows them to stretch their educational wings.  

“My professor asked me if I was interested in being part of his lab group,” said Benjamin, a biology major. “I thought it would be a cool opportunity, and a chance to take a risk and explore something new.” 

Benjamin previously spent her summers at home in New York City, but she accepted the invite from biology professor Israel Del Toro. She has spent her summer doing work in the biology department, conducting research that is going toward Del Toro’s ongoing study of urban bee habitats. 

“I’m really happy I stayed to do research,” said Benjamin. “I enjoy being part of Professor Del Toro’s lab and working with him. I’m also happy to be part of this research. The work we are doing is important because climate change is real and we have to protect the bees.”   

Samantha Torres, a psychology and theatre arts double major, also from New York, opted to spend her summer in Appleton as well.  

Professor Jesus Smith in the Ethnic Studies Department “told me he was very impressed with my work in the classroom and thought I would be a great assistant for him this summer,” said Torres. “I’d never considered living in Appleton for the summer, but I thought taking the risk would be worth it.” 

Stepping out of her comfort zone turned out to be a decision Torres does not regret. Staying on campus allowed her the opportunity to build transferable skills through research and the chance to experience Appleton in a way she is not able to during the school year.  

“I was especially driven to the research position because of my graduate school plans after Lawrence,” said Torres. “I knew research would make me a standout candidate. But staying also allowed me to meet so many new people and create fond memories that I wouldn’t have during regular term.” 

Than, meanwhile, said she’s learning a ton while spending her summer working with the Lawrence Office of Communications in video production.  

“I make videos that help promote Lawrence and the different aspects of Lawrence,” said Than. 

She started working at her position in the Communications office during the academic year. When she transitioned to a summer position, she wasn’t sure what to expect. 

“I didn’t expect to really get a chance to work on projects,” said Than. “But the whole (video) process, I get to do everything. It’s not just helping and assisting (the director of video production) with his work, I actually can work on my own projects.”     

Keeping it casual

Whether staying on campus or exploring the areas of Appleton near campus, there are plenty of things to do during down time in the summer. The pace is much slower.

“One day me and my friends just decided for dinner we were going to barbeque,” said Wilson. “We barbecued some burgers and then went inside to watch a movie; it was lots of fun.”  

There are tons of opportunities on campus to enjoy being outdoors. There’s a summer exclusive cookout every Wednesday in front of Kaplan’s Café called Griff’s Grill, plus outdoor volleyball games, and tons of spots around campus to enjoy a picnic.

A walk across the College Avenue bridge and a hard left onto S. Walter Street will take you into Telulah Park, home to a skateboard park, a disc golf course, a baseball diamond and a picnic area. It’ll also connect you to the Newberry Trail if you’re looking to hike or bike.

Besides the shopping and dining opportunities along College Avenue, you’re also close to coffee shops and restaurants overlooking the Fox River, some along the Newberry Trail near the Banta Bowl and some a short hike past the tennis courts on Drew Street (think E. Walter Street and S. Olde Oneida Street). Many of them have outdoor decks, allowing you take in the Wisconsin summer in all its glory.

Enjoy it while you can.

Awa Badiane ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Voices from abroad: LU students share takeaways from studying across the globe

Fallon Sellers drinks milk from a coconut while studying in Auckland, New Zealand.
Fallon Sellers ’20 enjoys fresh coconut milk while studying in Auckland, New Zealand.

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

It’s more than traveling the world; students who have enhanced their college experience with off-campus study often return with new perspectives and skills that stay with them for the rest of their lives.

Studying abroad last year made a lasting impression on Jackeline Flores ’19, who studied at the Lawrence University London Centre for her global studies major and Spanish minor.

“Personally, I feel that my experience abroad really solidified the idea that the world truly is my oyster,” she said. “All the knowledge and culture I was exposed to while abroad reminded me that there is so much out there left for me to learn about, which I find super exciting.”

Jackeline Flores takes in a view of the streets of London.
Jackeline Flores ’19 spent a term studying in London.

She’s not alone. We sampled more than a dozen Lawrence students who studied abroad during the past academic year, asking them to share key takeaways from their experience.

So many opportunities

The London Centre satellite campus is just one of 52 life-changing opportunities available to Lawrence students through the off-campus study program.

Each program blends classroom and experiential learning to facilitate students’ personal and academic growth through engagement with different cultures in an immersive learning environment. This leads to a range of profound benefits, says Director of Off-Campus Programs Laura Zuege.

“We know it affords the opportunities for intercultural learning, growth and development that employers time and time again are looking for,” she says. “Study abroad is a laboratory for that kind of development.”

Zuege and her colleagues work tirelessly to make these programs accessible and suitable for students of diverse academic, socioeconomic, social and ethnic backgrounds, by offering programs for every major and addressing students’ varied needs.

For more information on off-campus study, click here.

To see the full list of programs, click here.

“Different students have different concerns in different locations,” Zuege says. “We want to be tuned in with some of our portfolio (program) choices but also with how we approach, prepare and recruit students to be sure we’re reaching a range of the student body that’s representative of our student body.”

This fall, a breakthrough financial aid policy change is making that possible. All of a student’s institutional financial aid — grants, federal loans, scholarships — can now be contributed to off-campus study, in addition to existing study abroad scholarships. In the past, 100 to 120 students went abroad each year; this fall there will be 145.

What they’re saying

Here are a dozen more Lawrence students whose lives changed thanks to off-campus study last year:

Tamima Tabishat poses for a photo overlooking Rabat, Morocco.
Tamima Tabishat ’20 takes in a view overlooking Rabat, Morocco.

Tamima Tabishat ’20, AMIDEAST, area and Arabic language studies in Rabat, Morocco; global studies/German language studies and French language studies: “The most important (impact) was the way it helped me learn how to adapt quickly and smoothly to a new environment. Morocco’s geographic, linguistic, religious, political and cultural elements are very different from my typical academic environment. By studying in a new context, I felt that I was able to adopt new habits, adapt to new customs, and abide by new social rules, all of which are incredibly important skills to have in life. Practicing these things every day taught me how to see everything from a totally new perspective, which has made me not only a more critical thinker, but also a more considerate and tolerant citizen of the world.”

Joe Hedin ’19, Lawrence University London Centre, government/Spanish: “The London Centre allowed me to prepare myself for life after Lawrence. Thanks to the London Centre and Off-Campus programs staff, I had an internship, so I learned how to work in traditional offices, along with learning how to commute to work. I will never be able to put into words how impactful this was.”

Abigail Keefe ’20, IES Paris, language and area studies; violin performance, and mathematics/French and music theory: “Living in France with my host family helped me to improve my skills in the French language way beyond what I ever thought I would be capable of. Living in a country where my native language was not the primary language also helped me to try to understand how it would feel for people living and working in America for whom English is not their native language.”

Ryan Leonard sits in the sand in front of Mount Maunganui.
Ryan Leonard ’19 poses for a photo in Tauranga in front of Mount Maunganui.

Ryan Leonard ’19, IES Auckland, New Zealand, geology: “This experience is going to be one of the biggest selling points in my life after college. From the challenge of moving to a new country alone and having to meet new people, to maintaining good grades and budgeting and making time for travel, I have gained many marketable skills that I may not even realize I have acquired.”

Julia Johnson ’20, IES Vienna, music, cello performance; psychology/pedagogy: “It pushed my boundaries in so many ways such as speaking another language, making friends, being comfortable with public transportation, making travel plans, and not being afraid to explore Vienna and go to performances on my own. I feel like I grew more as a person studying in a new city where they speak another language more than I ever would have on my own campus.”

Ethren Lindsay ’20, Japan; linguistics and Japanese: “I was able to take many classes that would not have been available at my home university, one of which was a translation job. Since I am planning on possibly going into translation as a part of my future work, this was quite literally the most valuable thing that I could have gotten out of college.”

Alice Luo poses for a photo in an urban garden in Berlin.
Alice Luo ’19 visits an urban garden in Berlin.

Alice Luo (Manxin) ’19, IES Berlin, language and area studies; history: “Berlin is such a dynamic city with people coming from all over the world. In America, I felt an urge to be more American and I tried to deny my Chinese identity to some extent in order to better merge into the American culture. In Berlin, with the diverse population and cultures and a seemingly freer atmosphere, which I personally felt, I learned to accept my identity and even celebrate it and appreciate it.”

Juan Marin ’20, IES Freiburg, language and area studies; film studies and German: “I feel like the program taught me how to understand people better. I met a lot of people abroad, and I don’t just mean my classmates and more Americans. I met people from Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Greece, Russia, Bolivia, France, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, Australia, Germany (of course), Morocco, the UK, and more. The program gave me an even higher appreciation for diversity and inclusion.”

Kate Martensis ’20, Budapest, semesters in mathematics education; math and history: “As part of our practicum course, my fellow students and I each had to teach two classes at a local high school. Though the process was not without its difficulties, it was an incredibly valuable experience, and I was so glad to put all the things we’d learned from school visits and our classes into practice. This made me all the more excited to be a teacher.”

Tia Colbert looks up at a wax figure of Sherlock Holmes at the Sherlock Holmes Museum in London.
Tia Colbert ’20 checks out a wax figure of Sherlock Holmes while visiting the Sherlock Holmes Museum in London with her British Crime Fiction class.

Tia Colbert ’20, Lawrence University London Centre, English and Greek/creative writing: “There was a significant focus on using London itself as a textbook, and I feel like that enhanced all the classes. I believe that experiential learning is one of the best ways to engage students, and the London Centre Program definitely delivered in that respect.”

Harry Rivas ’19, ACM Shanghai, economics: “The program had a drastic impact on my life. It changed the way I saw the rest of the world, specifically how I saw China, the impact China has already had on the world, and what is to come. I got to explore a culture and mindset so different from my own.”

Fallon Sellers ’20, IES Auckland, New Zealand, government/international relations: “It was incredibly interesting to interact and work with others my age from a different social and academic culture than mine. Collaborating with them and learning their stances on business and ethical behavior was fascinating, and it was immensely rewarding to observe other points of view outside of the U.S.”

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Goats called in for weed control, and, yes, we put a “Goat Cam” on a goat named Blu

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

APPLETON – Goats are busy working the garden. We’ve got the “Goat Cam” footage to prove it.

Ten goats — two Nigerian dwarf goats and eight fainting goats — have settled into the SLUG garden on the Lawrence University campus, and for the next week will continue to devour unwanted thistle and burdock weeds.

The goats — supplied by Steve Anderson of Mount Morris, owner of the newly launched Goat Busters farm — arrived last Tuesday after Lawrence biology major and SLUG garden manager Floreal Crubaugh ’20 put out a call for rented goats.

“I was looking for more sustainable ways to control the weeds than applying herbicides, and more efficient ways than pulling them up manually,” Crubaugh said.

We attached a GoPro camera — our “Goat Cam” — to the back of one of the goats. We let Blu show us the work in progress on a Monday morning in the garden. Be warned: the footage is adorable and may steal a large chunk of your day.

The SLUG (Sustainable Lawrence University Garden), a student-run nonprofit enterprise that uses sustainable agricultural methods to nurture a honeybee apiary, a fruit tree orchard, a vegetable garden and a hoop house, has been a fixture on the Lawrence campus for nearly two decades.

But the use of goats is a first.

Crubaugh went in search of goat rentals after successfully seeking monies through a Lawrence sustainability grant. The thistle and burdock weeds on the east end of the garden had gotten unmanageable, and the student volunteers couldn’t keep up, she said.

“I thought, what if we got some goats in here and they basically do the work for us, all while providing a lot of benefits for the garden, like fertilizer and digesting the seeds?” she said. “It was a really impossible project to take care of as humans, so we turned to goats.”

Lawrence senior Floreal Crubaugh holds one of the goats in the SLUG garden.
Floreal Crubaugh ’20 holds one of the goats in Lawrence’s SLUG garden. Crubaugh, the garden manager, brought in goats to help control troublesome weeds that have overgrown a portion of the student-run garden.

See more photos of the goats in the SLUG garden here.

More on sustainability efforts at Lawrence here.

Crubaugh, Anderson and LU officials first sought permission from the City of Appleton to allow for the goats. They were granted a special exemption for three weeks.

Anderson installed a temporary fence last Monday, then delivered the goats the following day.

“With the university always being progressive and thinking ahead, I think this is going to encourage the city and the county to take goats more seriously,” Anderson said. “Invasive plants are a widespread problem, whether it’s these weeds or buckthorn or whatever the issue is.”

It’s the first time he’s rented out the goats, something he wants to do more of in the future.

Anderson, who initially got the 10 goats this spring to help tackle a growing buckthorn problem on his family’s 30-plus acres in Waushara County, said he hopes to expand his goat herd and eventually connect with cities and counties to help control weed and invasive plant issues in parks and along hiking trails.

“They eat the seeds,” Anderson said of the goats. “That’s one of the biggest advantages of the goats is that they digest the seeds. The birds just spread it. But goats will actually digest it, so there’s no new growth.”

Steve Anderson, operator of Goat Busters, holds one of the goats in the SLUG garden.
Steve Anderson operates Goat Busters out of Mount Morris. He delivered 10 goats to the SLUG garden at Lawrence. They’ll remain in the garden through July 19.

Visitors are welcome to check out the goats and the work going on in the SLUG garden, located at the base of the hill just off of Lawe Street. Most of the goats are fairly shy. But a couple are outwardly social and are happy to greet visitors to the garden.

Crubaugh, who can be found tending the garden most days during the summer, hopes her work in SLUG will set the table for career opportunities in the sustainability field after she graduates.

“This is a good way to get a taste of that,” she said.

The senior from Bloomington, Illinois, had worked with goats while helping relatives who operate a cattle ranch in Montana. She saw the sustainability benefits first hand.

“I’d go out there during my summers as a kid and help bottle feed the orphan goats, and I’d watch the goats just move across the fields like a sundial, just mowing everything down,” she said. “That’s where this idea sort of originated for me.”

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

Three for three: France teaching assignments a sign of growth for Francophone program

Cosette Bardawil ’19 is one of three Lawrence students earning teaching assignments in France.

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

Three Lawrence seniors have been awarded competitive assistant teaching positions through TAPIF (Teaching Assistant Program in France), a program that gives American citizens the opportunity to teach English in public schools in France, as well as in other Francophone locations such as French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Martinique and Réunion.

This is Lawrence’s most successful year with TAPIF yet; the highest number of applicants and a 100 percent acceptance rate. This year’s recipients — Kendra L. Van Duine ’19, Christian Lee Messier ’18 and Cosette Bardawil ’19 — will spend seven months of the next academic year in France in an immersive teaching and learning experience.

Lawrence students have been awarded assistant teaching positions through TAPIF in the past, but this year’s success shows the strides that have been made in Francophone Studies.

“Maybe five years ago we had probably one or two (applicants) and now we’re having more people apply … and everybody’s getting in,” said Eilene Hoft-March, Milwaukee-Downer College and College Endowment Association Professor of Liberal Studies and French professor. “Not everybody we nominated (in the past) got in, and I can’t remember that we had three and four people applying at one time, and now we do.”

But the success is no surprise to Hoft-March because the quality of the applicant pool is now so good.

“I think our applicants have been very serious,” she said. “When you look at the three people who’ve won, they’re very good students, they’ve applied themselves, and it’s not surprising to me at all that they’ve been placed.”

Perhaps this year’s success will herald more applicants and awardees in the future. Hoft-March sees it as a sign of growing appreciation for the academic excellence at Lawrence.

“I think that Lawrence may have risen in terms of being recognized for the quality of students we have, and I think that’s a really good thing,” she said.

For more on the French and Francophone Studies program, click here.

And the recipients are . . .

Kendra L. Van Duine ’19

Kendra L. Van Duine ’19 will be teaching in Rouen, France. Linguistic and cultural immersion through TAPIF will be valuable experience toward her goal of becoming a foreign language interpreter, translating French, Spanish, and Chinese into English. This will be her first time traveling abroad alone, and for such a long period of time. But she’s looking ahead with eagerness.

“I am very excited to have this opportunity and hope it will help me gain confidence in myself by helping other students with their foreign language skills,” Van Duine said. “I’m looking forward to getting out on my own and exploring France and the neighboring countries, as well as exploring who I am as an individual.”

Van Duine is a double-major in French and Spanish. In addition to being an RLA in Small Exec and an on-campus events coordinator for the LU People for Animal Welfare (PAW) club, she works as a research assistant in the French and Francophone Studies department.

Christian Messier ’18

Christian Messier ’18 double majored in French and music. He will be teaching at the primary school level in Tours-Orléans. For three summers he has worked at Concordia Language Villages, an immersive language summer camp, and was a French tutor at Lawrence. While assistant teaching in France, he hopes to explore other languages and expand his teaching into the realm of music.

“I’m really looking forward to working with new language learners, and hopefully I’ll be able to also teach music lessons at nearby schools,” Messier said. “I’m planning on reading a lot and traveling to various cities in France, Germany, Spain, Portugal and Italy to work on developing my abilities in those respective languages.”

Cosette Bardawil ’19

Cosette Bardawil ’19 will teach at the Académie de Rennes. The French and flute performance major is a French tutor and a LARY Buddy. She plays in the orchestra and in chamber groups, and aims to pursue music and self-exploration along with sharpening her language skills.

“My hopes for this upcoming adventure are to improve my French, help students as much as possible, explore different ways of teaching, play in some music ensembles and discover more about myself, others, and France,” Bardawil said.

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Music, food and games enjoyed during annual LUaroo festival

Story to Awa Badiane ’21

LUaroo, a spring tradition at Lawrence University, was held over the Memorial Day weekend, providing two days of live music, food and games.

With a compilation of performances from both Lawrence students and off-campus artists on Saturday and Sunday, the annual music festival had something for everyone. It’s a welcome break as spring term comes to a close and students prepare for finals.

“It’s a nice time to just chill with friends and listen to music,” Jailene Rodriguez ’21 said as she enjoyed the music under sunny skies. 

Being one week before finals, LUaroo is the perfect way to make memories with friends and blow off some steam before it’s time to buckle down and study. 

“It also helps there’s a holiday right after; great way to prep for the last week of classes,” Rodriguez said.  

Photo gallery from LUaroo

Besides being an opportunity for students to enjoy great music, LUaroo is also an amazing opportunity for student-artists to showcase their talents on stage.  

With a stage set up on the quad lawn, music started at noon both days and proceeded into the night. The lineup included, among others, Awake for Birds, Jamil & the Litterbox Kids, Daniel Green, Lala Lala, Tobi Lou, Four Fists and Oshun.

Listen to select songs by some of the featured artists on our LUaroo 2019 Spotify playlist:

“I feel like it’s a great way for musical artists on campus to promote their talents. It gives them practice for performing at bigger festivals,” said Louric Rankine ’21.

This Lawrence tradition has become something all students can look forward to, knowing they are able to have fun, let go, and enjoy some great music right here on campus.  Food, Frisbee and volleyball added to the festive spirit.

We gathered a few photos from student photographers from this year’s festival.  

Awa Badiane ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

You lost what? Our search of campus lost-and-found bins turns up 10 curious things

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

It happens to the best of us. Sometimes Lawrentians lose track of their belongings in the bustle of student life, and you never know what will turn up in the lost-and-found bins on campus. We visited some of these lost-and-found locations and picked out 10 curious misplaced items.

Photo of gray desk organizer.

#10 | Desk organizer

Pens and pencils, paperclips and highlights all without a home. It’s pretty hard to stay organized when you lose your entire desk organizer. Someone out there could use some tips on keeping track of things.

Photo of small painting featuring what appears to be planets covered in pink smears of paint.

#9 | Art

Even Lawrence’s lost and found bins are artistic. Who would leave this behind? The artist’s identity is a mystery. . .

Photo of amber-colored bow rosin for the bow of a string instrument.

#8 | Bow rosin

A string player’s best friend. As a former cellist it’s no surprise to see this in the lost and found. Really, has anyone in history ever gone through all their rosin before losing or breaking it? Users of ChapStick might be familiar with the phenomenon.

Photo of red and blue coffee mug featuring the letter "A."

#7 | Personalized letter “A” mug

Is there an Archie or Alyssa out there looking for their favorite mug? A personal mug like this one can make that daily cup (or many cups) of hot tea or coffee even more special and integral to your day.

Photo of white sheets of paper on which lyrics are scribbled.

#6 | Handwritten lyrics

Poetic talents abound on campus. Maybe this person didn’t like their work and chose to abandon it. Who knows, this could have been the beginning of the next greatest hit.

Photo of sparkly paper St. Patrick's Day decoration adorned with shamrocks and a green top hat.

#5 | Hanging shamrock wall decoration

This is probably the remnant of someone’s St. Patrick’s Day party that was discarded after the festivities. But the party hasn’t stopped; this decoration has been coating everything else in the lost-and-found bin in glitter.

Photo of packaged pumpkin carving kit.

#4 | Pumpkin carving kit

There is surely a faceless jack-o-lantern looking for this. This pumpkin-carving kit was misplaced before it could be opened and used. Maybe it will be reclaimed in time for next Halloween.

Red rolled-up sleeping bag.

#3 | Red sleeping bag

It’s unclear if this was ever used; maybe for a spontaneous camping trip? Or a camping trip that never happened? Regardless, it’s a strange thing to lose!

Photo of gray mesh zippered bag full of shampoo and other shower needs.

#2 | A whole shower caddy

How does one lose a shower caddy? A more vexing question, how does one lose it in the Conservatory where this was found? I’d like to hear the explanation behind this one.

Photo of Lawrence draw-string bag full of paints and brushes.

#1 | A bag of acrylic paints and paintbrushes

What’s an artist without their supplies? Whether these belonged to an art student here at Lawrence or just someone with a artsy hobby, I hope they come looking for their supplies soon so they can get back to creating masterpieces.

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Longboarding, anyone? Student clubs offer chances to get outside, be active

Story by Awa Badiane ’21

It’s spring. The sun is shining. It’s time to get outdoors and get active.

For Lawrence University students, the opportunities to do so as part of organized clubs are plentiful.

Longboarding or other skateboarding? Rock climbing? Biking? Rowing? Take your pick of those and many more.

Lawrence makes it incredibly easy for students to come together and pursue their passions. To start a club on campus, all you need is an idea and two friends, and your idea can become a Lawrence official club.

As an official club on campus, you can easily pursue your interests with help from campus coordinators, and potentially funding assistance from the university.  A lot of students take advantage of how efficient it is to start something on campus, making it pretty easy for students to find something fun to do. Everything from the Baking and Cooking Club to Sailing Lawrence will give students the opportunity to try something new.

For a directory of student organizations at Lawrence, click here.

As the weather warms up, students can take advantage of the long list of activities to partake in while enjoying the great outdoors.  

The Women’s Longboarding Club is an example of just one such opportunity.  

“I love riding with other people,” said Angela Caraballo ’21. “It’s fun to see others enjoying something that I also enjoy.”  

With meetings every Sunday afternoon, the Women’s Longboarding Club gives newcomers the chance to learn longboarding and gives experienced riders a chance to connect with other Lawrentians who share their interests.

“The thrill of riding around so freely, feeling the wind rush around me, is exhilarating,” said Jailene Rodriguez ’21. 

There are plenty of other opportunities to enjoy being outside both on and off campus. With clubs such as the Rock Climbers Club and Rowing Club, students are able to explore parts of Wisconsin they may have never seen.  And there’s a Badminton Club, a Slacklining Club, a Flag Football Club, a Bike Club, among others.

Rowing Club gives students the opportunity to row in various parts of Wisconsin and compete against other schools.  

In a similar fashion, the Rock Climbers Club gives students the opportunity to go to different hiking sites or rock climbing walls throughout the Midwest.  

“My favorite thing about Rock Climbers Club is that everyone starts out on the same level and folks are welcoming to newcomers,” said Spencer Washington ’21. “You don’t need much experience but rather openness and a willingness to trust your own movement.”

That goes for almost all of the student clubs. You don’t have to have any experience to join. You can be anywhere from novice to intermediate and still be able to participate in any of the clubs offered on Lawrence’s campus.  

So, what are you waiting for? Let’s get active.

(Photos above are Rebecca Minkus ’20 and Earl Simons ’22)

Awa Badiane ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office. 

Be proud: Lawrence swag every Lawrentian should own

Story by Awa Badiane ’21

Whenever I go home for break, I get asked one of two questions, “What school do you go to again?” and “What did you bring me?” That’s why I have compiled this list of Lawrence swag every Lawrentian should own, so we can all be prepared when it’s time to head home for the summer. Take a piece of Lawrence home for yourself and have something to give to someone else.  

1) Lawrence hoodie

Who doesn’t love a good hoodie? Especially a lined hoodie, with a reliable drawstring, that you can wear with everything! Every Lawrentian should own their very own classic Lawrence hoodie, and you can get one in Kate’s Corner Store located in the Warch Campus Center. A classic Lawrence hoodie and a pair of black leggings is the perfect outfit for any day.  

Male Lawrence student wearing navy blue Lawrence University hooded sweatshirt.

2) Class T-shirts 

Go Class of 2021! During Welcome Week, Lawrence starts off every Lawrentian’s collection of Lawrence gear by giving students their very own class shirts. Each class shirt has the class year and is the color that class is associated with.  Learn more about the tradition of Class Colors here.

Female Lawrence student wearing purple Lawrence Class t-shirt.

3) Lawrence phone accessories 

Never lose your ID again! With the Diversity and Intercultural Center-sponsored card holder, you can have all you most important cards on the back of your phone. Just peel of the paper lining and stick the holder to any case or directly on your phone. Or you can stop by Kate’s Corner Store and get yourself a Lawrence pop-socket! Now all you’ll need is your phone to show off some Lawrence pride. 

4) Vintage Lawrence  

BINGO! There are so many opportunities to win free Lawrence gear on campus. At a lot of these events you’ll have the opportunity to win some Lawrence classics that are no longer available for sale but are still very cute. I won my favorite Lawrence top from a BINGO game!  

Female Lawrence student wearing white Lawrence University long-sleeve shirt.

5) Glow-in-the-dark Lawrence water bottle 

The name honestly says it all. This addition to the Lawrence swag list was made available starting just this year. Glowing makes anything cool and having a water bottle that glows in the dark and represents Lawrence is the coolest thing ever. These water bottles are available for sale in Kate’s Corner Store.

These are my five essentials. Itching for more? Stop by Kate’s Corner Store in Warch or check out this site full of Lawrence gear. Do you have other Lawrence swag you can’t live without? Tell us all about it in our social media comments!

Awa Badiane ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

8 restaurants every Lawrentian should try

We asked student writer Isabella Mariani to share a list of her favorite restaurants in Appleton. If you have other favorites you’d recommend, share them in our social media comments.

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

Appleton’s restaurants have provided some of my fondest memories from my time at Lawrence, from the evenings going out with friends to indulge in a huge dinner after a rough week, to the blissful satisfying of burger cravings after a couple of hours at the gym. Of course, I haven’t been to every restaurant in Appleton. But I’ve come to appreciate the fare we have right around the corner. These local restaurants are here for you; they’re the moments when you say to yourself, “I deserve this.” So, may this list serve as a guide for your future best memories in Appleton.

#8. Muncheez Pizzeria – 600 W. College Ave.

Muncheez makes the cut for being the closest place to get decent pizza at a decent price. They’ve also been there for me through my late-night hankerings for pizza; they’re open until 3 a.m. all week. What’s not to love about a place that encourages you to eat pizza after midnight? Their menu offers whole pizzas or just by the slice.

Walkable from campus? Yes. It’s about a seven-block hike.

Favorite dish: Veggiefest

#7. Home Burger Bar – 205 W. College Ave.

You can be sure of getting a big, well-cooked burger served on a cute red tray at Home Burger Bar. Here’s two more important words for you: truffle fries. As good as the burgers are, I would stop in just for this trendy appetizer. The service isn’t always great but the food will be quality. Maybe one day I will be brave enough to try the PB&J Bacon burger. One day …

Walkable from campus? Yes. Just a few blocks down College Avenue.

Favorite dish: Steakhouse burger

#6. Culver’s – 3631 E. Calumet St.

Culver’s isn’t unique to Appleton, of course, but I would be remiss if I didn’t bring this Wisconsin-born chain to your attention. This is the place for quality fast food. I go through phases of intense cravings for one of their signature Butterburgers, followed by an amazing chocolate malt. Try the rotating custard Flavor of the Day. Try a Concrete Mixer (custard with candy mix-ins). Try it all. Here’s the menu. No, it’s not health food, but it’s made fresh and it’s good for your soul.

Walkable from campus? No. You’ll need to find some wheels for this one.

Favorite dish: Original Butterburger

#5. Antojitos Mexicanos – 204 E. College Ave.

Yes, you get free warm chips and three kinds of salsa while you wait for your food. If you don’t fill up on that, you have a wide range of dishes to choose from. The menu is huge! I like to inspect it for about 15 minutes and always end up with the fish tacos (go on Tuesdays and get them for $5!) This place gets pretty busy, so going for an early dinner is optimal.

Walkable from campus? Definitely. Just two blocks west of Drew Street.

Favorite dish: Fish tacos

#4. Katsu-Ya – 338 W. College Ave.

As a sushi lover, I am so grateful to have a place like Katsu-Ya right down the street. You can go alone for a light dinner and get a couple rolls of great sushi for pretty cheap. This restaurant also wonderfully caters to social dinners with your friends. I love the group effort of agreeing on which rolls everyone wants, enjoying them together, discussing which ones you liked best and ordering some more. It’s a very rewarding dining experience.

Walkable from campus? Certainly. A six-block hike west on College Avenue.

Favorite dish: Dragon Roll

#3. Harmony Pizza Café – 432 W. Wisconsin Ave.

Harmony Pizza has the best pizza in Appleton, and your patronage supports a local business started by Lawrence alumni. Choose a pizza from their vegan-friendly menu or build your own; it’s all made with locally sourced organic ingredients. The atmosphere doesn’t suffer when it gets busy. Everyone seems to know everyone, and you might run into some professors during your meal.

Walkable from campus? Maybe. It would be a serious walk, north to Wisconsin Avenue and then another eight blocks or so to the west.

Favorite dish: The Beetza

#2. Basil Café – 1513 N. Richmond St.

Basil Café is my favorite among Appleton’s Thai and Vietnamese fare. Your experience starts as soon as you sit down when you get a pitcher of cool, fragrant coconut water at your table while you peruse the menu. Anything you get will hit the spot, from noodle-based soups and salads to curry and stir fry. I cannot wait to try more of what this place has to offer.

Walkable from campus? Probably not. It’s north of Wisconsin on Richmond. May need to find a ride.

Favorite dish: Kow Boon

#1. India Darbar – 2333 W. Wisconsin Ave.

Wow. How do I transcribe the sound of my stomach growling? This is the best Indian food in the area. Just thinking about the menu is making me so hungry. You have to start with nan — garlic and stuffed are my favorites — and from there, just go crazy. There is so much to choose from and you can’t go wrong. Come with a group of friends, decide on a few dishes that look good and share them!

Walkable from campus? No. You’ll want to catch a ride for this one. But well worth the effort.

Favorite dish: All of it

These are just my picks. Have you also had great meals at Appleton’s restaurants? Tell us where in our social media comments.

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.