Tag: Lawrence students

2020 in focus: Photographer shares 10 favorite Lawrence images of the year

By Danny Damiani / Communications

At the end of a year that included more than 1,000 edited photos taken in and around the Lawrence University campus, I was tasked with selecting my top 10 images of 2020. Narrowing this rather unusual year down to 10 photos was a difficult task, but below you will find my favorites, along with notes on how and why. A huge thank you to all the students, faculty, and staff who allow me to step into their world both digitally and in person to make all of my photos happen.

1. Aerial Landscape, the Wellness Center, and Sampson House reflected just before sundown on Aug. 6. One of my goals this year was to try to show campus in new ways. I spent many hours this summer looking for different angles to reflect this beautiful campus. It wasn’t until I spotted a portion of Aerial Landscape reflected in nearby glass that I stopped and worked the angle of the reflection to get this result.

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2. Students dance during the Feb. 1 President’s Ball in Warch Campus Center. Thinking back to winter term, a favorite memory is the smiling faces at the President’s Ball. Covering the event was a bit of a technical challenge because of the low light, but like many assignments, it’s all about waiting in the right place for the right moment.

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3. Ryan Erdmann ’22 wears a mask while taking part in a Chamber Music class in City Park on Oct. 7. Mask-wearing quickly became a vital aspect of 2020, so I always kept an eye out for students who were using their masks to show off a little of their personality. It took nearly the entire class before I was able to get the light to fall in just the right spot for this photo.

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4. Kelvin Maestre ’21, a Makerspace assistant, watches as a laser cutter starts its work on a piece of wood on Jan. 22 in the Seeley G. Mudd Library. Having the chance to document the interesting work that students do is a highlight of my job. That often goes hand in hand with our 2 Minutes With series of student features. I knew the Makerspace would have lots of interesting light sources, so I went in looking to take an image that utilized one of them.

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5. Ghania Imran ’21 poses for a May 22 portrait in her Chicago home via Zoom. Speaking of our 2 Minutes With series, many of the photos I take for those stories are portraits. Spring Term brought new challenges for taking portraits of students. For this photo, I decided to try a portrait through Zoom. It involved lighting the laptop with two separate lights, help from Ghania to find a good spot in her home, and finally positioning the laptop for the right angle.

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6. Sonja Klusman plays the piano with Matt Turner, instructor of music, during an Applied Musicianship II class on Feb. 17 in Shattuck Hall. I always take into account the amount of time that’s available to me when I get to an assignment. Do I need to get a photo within five minutes or, in the case of this image, do I have the time to really explore different angles?

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7. Nicholas Jatta ’21 kicks a soccer ball with friends Oct. 6 on the Quad. During Fall Term, I spent a good deal of time looking to document what students were up to in this Honor the Pledge environment. Finding Nicholas kicking the soccer ball with friends was a pleasant surprise. Not only was the afternoon light falling beautifully on the Quad, but it had been a long time since I had the chance to photograph anything related to sports.

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8. The moon rises above Main Hall on Jan. 7. This image came together as I was nearing the end of a workday. While walking to Brokaw Hall from the Warch Campus Center, I noticed the moon was bright, and close enough the cupola to capture a photo.

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9. Nathan Graff ’22 and Daniel Johnson ’23 rehearse outdoors with the Jazz Ensemble on Oct. 7. After taking photos of an outdoor music class in City Park (see earlier entry), I decided to edit the images on Main Hall Green. Not long into my edit I heard the sounds of brass behind me. After getting a few images of the Jazz Ensemble students as they practiced, I noticed the shadows against the white chapel, so I reset myself and took this photo.

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10. Sophia Driessen ’22 transplants leafy greens while working on a hydroponics research project on Dec. 10 in the Briggs Hall greenhouse. This was the first time I took photos in the greenhouse. The purples and greens are what pull this image together for me.

Danny Damiani is a multimedia specialist in the Communications office. Email: daniel.t.damiani@lawrence.edu

Most-viewed Lawrence stories of 2020: Bright lights in midst of a daunting year

The President’s Handshake, a tradition of Welcome Week, was reimagined at the outset of Fall Term, one of many adjustments made to keep campus safe during the pandemic. President Mark Burstein met each incoming student and presented them with a luminary to be displayed. (Photo by Danny Damiani)

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

It’s been a different sort of year. The COVID-19 pandemic certainly altered life on the Lawrence campus.

But one thing proved true. Lawrentians (and future Lawrentians and friends of Lawrence) are hungry to read about Lawrence and their fellow Lawrentians. We’ve dived into the analytics to share today the most viewed stories of 2020 on the Lawrence news site. (A few of the stories that placed in the top 20 are partnered here because they are so closely related.)

Eight alumni, eight stories: See 2020 edition here.

From voice professor John Holiday’s success on NBC’s The Voice to Lawrence again being hailed as a world-class school to adjustments made to campus life in the midst of a pandemic, there was no shortage of Lawrence news that drew a lot of interest. We provide here links to those most popular stories. Check out what you missed or take another look at stories that remind us of what makes Lawrence shine.

1. John Holiday hits big on NBC’s The Voice.

“There are people who dare to dream bigger than themselves; they never stop learning, never stop growing. I wanted to show my students what that looked like.” See stories here and here.

2. Princeton Review names Lawrence one of nation’s Best Impact schools.

“I see it and hear it when I meet with our alumni around the world. They point back to their time at Lawrence as unlocking something for them, discovering an interest or talent they didn’t know they had until they started working with professors here who helped guide them in that discovery.” See story here.

3. We say farewell to beloved Lawrentians.

“I will always remember Lifongo as the warmest, kindest, and most generous, joyful, and magnanimous of colleagues and friends.” … “I know many Lawrentians join me in remembering moments when Terry’s advice provided exactly what you needed to hear to be the best version of yourself.” See stories here and here.

4. Campus life changes amid COVID-19 pandemic.

“All of us living, learning, and working on campus this fall need to understand and to honor the responsibilities outlined by the Pledge.” See stories here and here.

5. A professor’s guide offers look at Freshman Studies.

“The entire list shows a remarkable range and an admirable ambition.” See story here.

6. New trestle trail adds to trails, parks near campus.

“The abandoned railroad trestle has been transformed into a 10-foot-wide trail that spans the Fox River at the southern edge of campus.” See story here.

7. Bidding good-bye for now to retiring faculty.

“You have served as a steadying force, stepping into a host of academic leadership positions that have lent stability in moments of uncertainty and grace in times of worry.” See story here.

8. Six faculty earn tenure.

“I’m absolutely delighted that their contributions are being recognized through the awarding of tenure and promotion, and look forward to continuing together our rich, rewarding work for years to come.” See story here.

 9. Jake Woodford ’13 elected mayor of Appleton.

“It has been a pleasure to watch Jake’s energy turn toward the city he loves.” See story here.

10. Princeton Review names Lawrence to Best Colleges list.

“As we head into another academic year, albeit one that looks different from any other in history, it’s reassuring to see that some things have remained the same.” See story here.

11. President Mark Burstein announces plans to leave Lawrence.

“During Mark’s tenure, our curricular offerings became deeper and broader, applications and the endowment increased dramatically, and our community became more diverse, inclusive, and equity-minded.” See story here.

12. Lawrence offers assistance during pandemic.

“We have always risen to the challenges that face us with resilience and ingenuity.” See story here.

13. Conservatory named ‘hidden gem,’ adapts to life in pandemic.

“It’s beautiful, creative flexibility. We’re working with our students all the time to say, ‘This is what you’re going to need out there in the world, and this is what’s going to be exciting about being a musician in the world today.’” See story here.

14. Natasha Tretheway named 2020 Commencement speaker.

“Our journeys have been intertwined since I visited Lawrence four years ago, and I am delighted and honored to be able to reconnect with this class in such a meaningful way.” See story here.

15. Spencer Tweedy ’19 enjoys Kimmel appearance, Instagram show.

“One of the really, really cool things about my time at Lawrence was that the boundary between the Conservatory and the college is pretty permeable.” See story here.

16. Lawrence adds major in Creative Writing, minor in Statistics and Data Science.

“We’ve seen more prospective students articulating their desire to focus directly on creative writing.” … “Data scientists are working with bioinformatics, genetics; it’s huge in economics, and it’s become a huge thing in political science.” See story here.

17. Four alumni added to Board of Trustees.

“At this critical moment for higher education, I couldn’t be more appreciative for the diverse group of individuals who are giving so much of their time and talent as trustees to ensure that the college continues to distinguish and differentiate itself.” See story here.

18. Alexander Gym court gets a redesign.

“While resurfacing was certainly a maintenance requirement, the fresh new design work is an added bonus.” See story here.

19. Our 2020 Alumni Awards are announced.

“While the COVID-19 pandemic has shut down the annual Reunion celebration, this year’s recipients are still being celebrated for their contributions to both the Lawrence community and the world.” See story here.

20. Alex Damisch ’16 cherishes her Jeopardy experience.

“After I taped the shows, I thought to myself, ‘Man, it went by so fast, and I was always so focused on my next move, I hope I remembered to smile.’ Spoiler alert: I did not.” See story here.

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

Can we talk? Student writers share their in-person, remote Fall Term experiences

Awa Badiane ’21 (left) and Isabella Mariani ’21

Like other Lawrence students, Awa Badiane ’21 and Isabella Mariani ’21 are navigating Fall Term amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Awa is doing so on campus in Appleton. Isabella is doing so remotely, having spent part of the term accessing classes while working on an organic farm in Hawaii before returning home to Sun Prairie, Wisconsin, in early November. The two Communications Fellows talked to each other about their respective student experiences.

Story by Awa Badiane ’21 and Isabella Mariani ’21

Isabella: Hey, Awa, I’ve been seeing friends posting on social media about life on campus right now. How’s that going for you? 

Awa: Hey, Isabella! I can truthfully say it’s not like any other year I’ve had here at Lawrence, but I’m glad I can be closer to my friends. What’s it been like taking classes remotely? 

Isabella: The first thing that comes to mind is how hard it is to stay motivated. One of the biggest roadblocks to remote learning, I think, is losing motivation. There’s no right or wrong way to motivate yourself; it comes down to what works for you as an individual.  

Awa: I hear that. I remember during Spring Term when most students were off campus and all my classes were online. I would be up until about 6 a.m. trying to read before class because that was the only time motivation struck. Maybe it was something about watching the sunrise after spending all night on TikTok that gave me the real push I needed. 

Isabella: I love that. Maybe it comes down to dedicating that period of time when you put yourself in an academic mindset.  

Awa: How about staying organized? Have you been able to do that?

Isabella: This is another big one for me. I’ve found myself losing track of dates and deadlines when taking classes. That’s pretty natural, since no one else is around to hold me accountable for making it to class or turning things in on time. Honestly, writing in my planner every day is really the only thing keeping me on track with school. It might surprise you how much making lists can boost your confidence and productivity. 

 Awa: I still find myself losing track of dates and deadlines, even on campus. I’m glad you have found a way that works for you in keeping track of assignments as they are coming up. Having two in-person classes and my third class being synchronous on Zoom has definitely helped. I am able to create a schedule around my classes.  

Isabella: Yeah, I guess it’s comforting to know people struggle with this on campus, too. You’re lucky to have those class times that you can work around. Being on the farm or at home, it’s also been helpful to have a space where I keep all my school stuff. Just to create a “class space” where everything is kept in order. 

Awa: Have you felt connected to campus when you are so far away?

Isabella: Connecting to people and resources on campus definitely feels harder being remote. While Lawrence has lots of connective resources on campus, it’s easy to feel distant from that when you are at home. I just remind myself that I’m only an email away from the CAS staff, and you also can schedule Wellness Center telehealth appointments for counseling or health issues if you’re not on campus. And staying in touch with professors has been really helpful. 

Awa: I hope you’re not having FOMO about life on campus! It’s still pretty hard to see people here. We all want to stay safe, so seeing friends you don’t live with has been a challenge. 

Isabella: I do sometimes get FOMO seeing some of my friends posting on Instagram from campus. But as you say, it might be more painful if I was there and couldn’t spend time around them if they weren’t in my pod. Are you still in regular contact with your professors? Does being on campus make that different for you? 

Awa: I would say getting to see my professors in person is one of the biggest benefits from being on campus. I have two classes in person, so I get to ask any question I may have there, rather than waiting for an email.  

Isabella: How about developing a routine? That’s been another big one for me. It’s been one of the hardest things. Remote learning is full of distractions, and it can feel impossible for me to make time to get things done. At home, I’m so distracted by my dogs, and suddenly deciding to rearrange my room. That’s why I think creating your own routine is key when you’re remote. Again, I don’t think there’s a formula you have to follow for this. It’s just about knowing what works for you personally. 

Awa: That’s true. I think the same works for being on campus. Sometimes I get jealous of my friends who only have class online because they don’t have to leave their rooms, but I’ve found little things I can do before class like grabbing lunch to get me excited. And I also remember how I would be up until 6 a.m. when my classes were online and I thank myself for making the best decision for me. Do you think being off campus is working for you? 

Isabella: Ultimately, I think it was the best decision for me. I know plenty of people are making it work on campus right now, but I don’t think I could properly enjoy my time there right now. I’m glad you mentioned using lunch to get yourself ready for class. Building routines around mealtimes is definitely helpful, which reminds me of something I’m really curious about. Do you think your sleeping habits/routines are different on campus? 

Awa: Surprisingly, it has been better. My sleeping schedule during Spring Term in quarantine was all over the place, probably because of all the late-night snacks. But here I know I have to get up and get ready for class, so I try to make sure I get enough sleep to do that.   

Isabella: Finding personal time also is really big for me. When all is said and done, you’re still a person with needs before you’re a student. It’s crucial to find a balance between your academic responsibilities and your personal life, especially when those two become intertwined. Just because you’re not in an academic environment doesn’t mean you can’t indulge in a nap on your couch or watch movies. 

Awa: I completely agree with you. Even though two of my classes are in person, I still find myself on Zoom calls quite often. From LUCC meetings, to committee meetings, to meetings with administration, etc., I am on Zoom A LOT. But I have found in between the many Zoom meetings, stepping away from my computer and phone and just going for a walk or curling my hair to be very relaxing. 

Isabella: Wow, I always forget how busy you are. You must actually be an expert at knowing when you need personal time.  

Awa: It’s been great catching up.  

Isabella: This has been interesting because I expected that students on campus wouldn’t be having the same problems as me. I even thought that students on campus were simply having an easier go of things because they’re physically at Lawrence. But that’s not always the case.  

Awa: Yeah, we are living in very interesting times. It’s been an adjustment for all of us. It helps that we are all going through it together.  

Awa Badiane ’21 and Isabella Mariani ’21 are student writers in the Communications office.

Luminaries light up Main Hall entrance to welcome new students to Lawrence

Luminaries line the walkway and steps in front of Main Hall Sunday night. (Photos by Danny Damiani)

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

The light that glowed from the steps and walkway in front of Main Hall on Sunday night sent a welcoming message to the more than 400 first-year and transfer students who will be beginning their studies at Lawrence University today.

In a reimagining of the traditional presidential handshake, the students made their way to the president’s house, where President Mark Burstein greeted each one on the lawn – masks on, from 6 feet apart – welcoming them to Lawrence and presenting them with a luminary. The students then brought the luminary to the front of Main Hall, placing it with those of their classmates.

Welcome Week greets first-year students. Read more here.

“Bring Your Light” was the theme. With safety protocols in place during the COVID-19 pandemic, the presidential handshake ceremony that usually happens the night before classes begin could not take place in its usual way. Thus, it was reimagined in a way that still allowed each first-year student to be personally welcomed by the president.

“It’s an incredibly important moment in the student experience,” Burstein said. “It gave me a chance to talk with every first-year student.”

The process began before the sun went down, but by the time the more than 400 luminaries were in place, the lights were glowing in the dark, lighting the way into a new journey.

Eighty-six luminaries were placed on the Main Hall steps to represent the first-year students who opted to study remotely during Fall Term. The students who are on campus then walked with their luminaries from the president’s house, traversing campus before placing them along the sidewalk leading from the steps.

Perhaps a new tradition was born.

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

From student leaders: 8 tips for living life on campus amid this pandemic

Signage is in place, adding reminders to the new protocols on campus. (Photos by Danny Damiani)

The Lawrence University Community Council’s Student Welfare Committee has a message of unity as students return to campus for Fall Term: We are Lawrentians, and we are up to the challenge of protecting our community.

With more than 850 students expected to be living on campus amid new safety protocols put in place to combat the spread of COVID-19, the commitment to the practices set forth in the Lawrence Campus Community Pledge will be key to keeping campus as open as possible, said committee chair Sterling Clarke Elvin Ambrosius ’22.

Challenges, excitement mix as Fall Term arrives: Read more here.

Welcome Week greets Class of 2024. Read more here.

The Student Welfare Committee shares eight ways you can help protect the Lawrence community:

1. Stay within Lawrence community as much as possible. 

Bellin Health’s testing of every student, faculty, and staff member on campus, combined with plans to use quarantine and isolation spaces on campus, gives us the best chance of keeping the spread of the virus in check. If you must leave campus, remember to follow the same safety protocols you do on campus like wearing masks, maintaining social distance, avoiding crowded spaces.

2. Avoid large gatherings like parties. Don’t go to bars.

We need to think about our social priorities in a different way. There are lots of creative opportunities for fun and spending time with one another in a safe manner — sticking with our pods or taking part in larger campus events designed with physical distancing and other safety practices in place. Outdoor yoga, anyone?

A yoga class is conducted Friday on Main Hall Green.

3. Wear a mask. 

This is an easy one. Make it part of your routine when you leave your room in the morning. Phone, LU ID, wallet, mask. Make your mask a fashion statement. Have fun with it. Show if off. Wear it proudly.

4. You’re paying for your education, so don’t waste your money.

We all know this pandemic life isn’t ideal, here on campus or anywhere else. But we’re still Lawrentians. We’re in class with brilliant professors and sharing spaces – virtual or in person – with smart, curious, open-minded, diverse, and amazing classmates. Let’s all rise to the occasion together. We’ll be all the smarter for it. 

5. Have the courage to hold others accountable.

There’s been a lot of chatter among students at campuses across the country about how to respond to poor choices by fellow students. To snitch or not to snitch. Let’s not look at it that way. Let’s be respectful but vigilant. Let’s be appreciative when someone reminds us of the Pledge we signed. It’s not about me, it’s about we. The University has laid out consequences for students, faculty, and staff who fail to abide by the Pledge. Let’s work together, as a community, to make that unnecessary.

6. Be a responsible community member.

The decisions we make matter. We are connected to others on campus. And the campus is connected to those who call Appleton home. And Appleton to the greater Fox Valley. And so on. Let’s take pride in Lawrence setting the example of what is possible as we find our way through this pandemic.  

7. Avoid public transportation once in Appleton.

Use the LU Shuttle instead. It’s free! The LUCC Student Welfare Committee is running the shuttle to pick up students from Appleton International Airport and the Appleton Bus Terminal. There’s no need to grab a ride share. The shuttle is free, and it comes with snacks. Safety practices will be in place. It’s be available for students returning to campus now through Sept. 12.

8. Think of others and be generous.

We all need to think about how our actions affect everyone. Never before has it been clearer that we are a community, that we’re all connected in a myriad of ways despite our different interests, backgrounds, viewpoints, and experiences. That togetherness is something we should be celebrating right now. The things that drew us to Lawrence – the chance to be a small, tight-knit, enthusiastic, and, yes, wonderfully quirky community on this gorgeous liberal arts campus – will be the things that see us through these difficult times.

These 13 beloved traditions keep Lawrentians connected

The Class of 2020 will hand off yellow to the Class of 2024 in the coming days, keeping the class colors tradition alive.

Story by Allison Boshell ’21

We have many traditions at Lawrence University that have carried on through the years. As we prepare to begin a new academic year, let’s celebrate 13 of them.

Allow me to be your tour guide as Lawrence welcomes the Class of 2024 with Welcome Week festivities that begin on Tuesday.

A quick aside: Many student organizations on campus have their own beloved traditions that are worth exploring. We aren’t going to get into all of those here. Rather, these are 13 annual campus-wide staples that are part of the Lawrentian experience. Some began well over a century ago and some were established more recently, but all are now part of what makes Lawrence so special.

The safety protocols in place during Fall Term to restrict the spread of COVID-19 will alter or postpone some of these traditions this year. But all are expected to carry on, even if they have to take a brief hiatus.

President’s handshake 

President Mark Burstein greets every incoming first-year student with a handshake during Welcome Week. It’ll be restructured this year amid the COVID-19 pandemic, but the spirit of the tradition will live on. A presidential handshake also happens at Commencement, marking the other end of the Lawrence journey.

At the close of Welcome Week, before returning students move into the residence halls, the University president personally welcomes the incoming class to Lawrence in an event at Memorial Chapel, shaking each new student’s hand. This ceremony is a way to symbolize you joining the Lawrence community, similar to how seniors at commencement shake the president’s hand again to celebrate graduation. As a freshman, this ceremony made me feel like there was a clear beginning, a sign of my transition into college, where I would soon experience and learn more things than I could have ever imagined. 

LU Zoo Days 

The dunk tank is part of Zoo Days, a Spring Term tradition.

Organized by our student events organization SOUP during Spring Term when the weather is starting to warm up, Lawrentians from all over campus congregate on Ormsby Green to play games, listen to music, and enjoy an afternoon of fun in the sun. The best part about Zoo Days is that all of the money raised by student clubs and organizations goes toward nonprofit causes. Favorite things to do at Zoo Days include getting soaked by the “dunk tank,” having a hot dog at the barbecue, and making sand art. 

Winter Carnival 

The President’s Ball, the highlight of Winter Carnival, provides a chance to dress up and hit the dance floor.

Winter Carnival is a spark of warm joy in the cold of Winter Term here at Lawrence. Activities for the carnival vary year to year, from ice sculpting to building gingerbread houses to playing grocery BINGO. One of the most exciting events of the year comes at the end of Winter Carnival, when President’s Ball is held. It’s a night of dancing to a live jazz band and eating chocolate fondue. President’s Ball takes the cake because all students and faculty get dressed to the nines. It’s always exciting to see students get out of their winter clothes and study sweatpants and into their best formal wear. It’s the best night of Winter Term.  

LUaroo 

Memorial Day Weekend is all about music and sun on the quad. The annual music festival, arriving just before Spring Term finals, is a favorite for many students.

Lawrentians look forward to Memorial Day weekend. Why? Because LUaroo, the much-anticipated, weekend-long mini music festival on the quad, is the highlight of all the annual events at Lawrence. Coming to enjoy artists from around the Midwest — and even bands from our own Conservatory of Music — students lay out on the quad or dance with friends from morning until night all weekend long. It’s a great stress-breaker right before Spring Term finals. LUaroo is by far my favorite event of the year because the whole campus comes together. One year there was a taco truck that came to campus, and Chicago-based artists Ric Wilson and Kweku Collins were spectacular as they headlined the festival. Great memories.

Cabaret 

International students come together on stage each year to present a spectacular showcase of talents and customs from around the world.

Lawrence’s international students come together each year to put on a show of cultural expressions. Performed in Stansbury Theatre, the spectacle includes original and traditional dance choreography, musical offerings, and fashion. The Cabaret is different every year, with a changing theme to guide the “plot” of the show. This truly is a must-see event every year. My favorite thing about Cabaret is seeing friends and classmates show off amazing talents that I never knew they had.   

Cultural Expressions

Cultural Expressions has grown into an annual tradition that marks the close of People of Color Empowerment Week on campus.

This showcase of on-campus performance talent, ranging from music to dance to spoken-word, has become a tradition over the past half dozen years, a conclusion to the annual People of Color Empowerment Week. Two years ago, the Excellence Ball was added at the front end of the week, providing bookends to a week of films, art, and speakers on issues of equity, opportunity, and inclusion.

The Rock 

The Rock, located just north of Main Hall, is the longest tradition on this list. It dates back to 1895.

The 2-ton granite boulder next to Main Hall is back in its rightful place after having gone missing for about 20 years. The Rock was brought to campus 124 years ago by the Class of 1895 after students found it on a geology trip in New London, Wisconsin. It made its debut next to Main Hall a short time later. The Rock has been painted countless times for all kinds of causes. It’s been the subject of pranks and fraternity feuds, where it has been guarded and dragged across campus, and, yes, stolen. But mostly painted. We are excited to see the different ways students will paint it in the days, weeks, and years to come. 

Ormsby Lake 

The lawn in front of Ormsby Hall, just west of Main Hall (seen here), is transformed into an ice rink each winter. It draws ice skaters and broom ball combatants.

More like Ormsby Ice Rink during the winter. This classic nod to winter is a hot spot for fun on Ormsby Green during January and February. From skating and broomball to frolicking with friends, students come to the “lake” to get a break from studying during the dark days of Winter Term. I personally enjoy seeing my fellow Lawrentians participate in games on Ormsby Lake, some just trying to run or walk across the ice without falling.  

Class Colors 

Each class is assigned one of four colors. They rotate, with the graduating class handing off its color to the incoming class. It’s a tradition that dates back to the days of Milwaukee-Downer College.

Red, yellow, green, and purple: the class colors originate from a Milwaukee-Downer College tradition. Class colors at Milwaukee-Downer were given to each class to provide them a sense of unity, a tradition Lawrence would eventually embrace. The first colors at Lawrence were assigned in 1988, 24 years after the 1964 merger. It is cherished to this day. Each new class inherits the color of the newly graduated class, presented during Welcome Week in Memorial Chapel. Every new first-year class holds the flag in the class photo at the beginning of the year. My class color is purple, and at the beginning of my freshman year each student was given a purple T-shirt decorated with our graduation year.  

Weekends at Björklunden 

A weekend at Bjorklunden has been a cherished tradition for generations of Lawrence students.

Going to Björklunden for a weekend during a rigorous term of studying is a breath of fresh air all Lawrentians enjoy. Located in Door County, on the shoreline of Lake Michigan, Björklunden is a Swedish-inspired lodge long popular among alumni and students. Whether it’s classes, clubs, organizations, or residence halls making the trip, it’s going to be both a learning and relaxing experience. Visiting “Björk,” as students call it, is always an honor because no other college I have heard of has a lodge on a 425-acre estate that students are free to go to on the weekends. When I have gone to Björk, I usually study by the fire, or go for walks by the lake, even in the cold of winter. It’s a treasured tradition.  

The Honor Code 

Lawrence students live by the Honor Code. It’s part of being a Lawrentian.

On each paper or project a Lawrentian submits, you can see “IHRTLUHC” adorning the cover, which stands for “I hereby reaffirm the Lawrence University Honor Code.” Upon their arrival to campus, each student commits themselves to the Honor Code: “No Lawrence student will unfairly advance their own academic performance or in any way limit or impede the academic pursuits of other students of the Lawrence community.” This code is what binds Lawrentians together academically and prompts social responsibility in all aspects of life. At the beginning of freshman year, every student is required to sign the Honor Code, which ties them to the Lawrence community through a fundamental social promise that shows they not only take their own development seriously but the development of their peers as well.  

The Viking Room 

For more than 50 years now, the Viking Room has been an on-campus hangout for students of age. Carving their names into the furniture is part of the tradition.

Founded in 1969 as a bar, the Viking Room (fondly referred to as the VR) is one of the campus’ eclectic, prime hang-out spots for students ages 21+. Located in the basement of Memorial Hall, the VR is managed, tended, and stocked by students who are looking for a fun service experience on campus. Although it first became a bar in 1969, the VR served as a popular lounge on campus for many years prior to that. It has carved out a rich history—literally. Just look for yourself! Climb into the booths or sit at the wooden tables and you can see the surfaces are covered in scratched signatures and carvings from students throughout Lawrence’s history.   

The Great Midwest Trivia Contest 

The Great Midwest Trivia Contest continues to connect current and former Lawrentians.

Established in 1966, this tradition is fully student run, but teams from all around the world participate annually. Broadcast online from Lawrence’s WLFM radio station in the Music-Drama Center, the Great Midwest Trivia Contest is a weekend-long event that is not for the weak of heart. Running around the clock and overseen by a team of dedicated trivia masters, it’s an annual frenzy of bizarre and off-the-beaten-path trivia. It remains a great connector with Lawrence alumni who return to the game year after year. Sleep is optional.  

Allison Boshell ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Makerspace provides huge assist as it builds needed PPE inventory for campus

Angela Vanden Elzen models one of the face shields built with 3D printers in Lawrence University’s Makerspace, located in the Mudd Library. “It turned into this awesome community effort,” she said. (Photos by Danny Damiani)

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

In the scramble for an adequate supply of PPEs amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Lawrence University is getting a needed boost from its own Makerspace.

Using 3D printing technology, Reference and Learning Technologies Librarian Angela Vanden Elzen and student intern Kelvin Maestre ’21 have led efforts this summer to 3D print 200 plastic face shields and 150 ear savers in the Makerspace lab inside the Mudd Library.

The Makerspace’s personal protective equipment (PPEs), as well as cloth face masks made by students through the Conservatory’s costume shop, are now being distributed on campus through Wellness Services. The face shields provide another layer of protection beyond masks and the ear savers offer a more comfortable way of securely wearing a mask.

“This work began on a more exploratory level at the start of the summer,” Vanden Elzen said of the Makerspace efforts. “We found 3D printable files for both the ear savers and the face shield visors on the NIH (National Institutes of Health) 3D print exchange. They’ve created a special COVID-19 response collection of objects that have either been tested for clinical use or community use. It was important for us to find designs that were created by scientists and professionals in the medical field.”

Kelvin Maestre ’21 joined Angela Vanden Elzen in the Makerspace this summer in the building of face shields and ear savers, adding to needed PPE inventory on the Lawrence University campus.

Vanden Elzen and Maestre went to work prepping the Makerspace technology to make large batches on the 3D printers. That proved to be pretty easy for the ear savers, where they could print five at a time using two printers. Additional parts or modifications weren’t needed.

The face shields production, meanwhile, was a different story. Initially, only two would fit on a printer at a time, so Maestre, an anthropology major from Revere, Massachusetts, explored ways to modify the process. When he was done, they were able to print 16 at a time, using all three of the 3D printers.

Read more about Makerspace possibilities here.

“After doing some research, I learned how to print the shields in stacks of 16,” Maestre said. “All you need is the right amount of gap between each shield that would allow you to separate them. In our case, the shield was 5 millimeters tall and we used a .2 millimeter layer height to print, so we used a gap of .21 millimeter between each shield to make them separable.”

After Maestre’s ingenuity got production rolling, it was time to recruit some help for the visor construction, which came enthusiastically from other workers in the library.

“It takes a bit of time to carefully separate the visors and sand any rough edges or bumps from the printing process to make them comfortable to wear,” Vanden Elzen said. “The shields then need the actual shield part. We ordered plastic folder covers that each need to be 3-hole punched. The finishing piece is two looped-together rubber bands to hold the visor on the wearer’s head.”

In all, 200 plastic face shields and 150 ear savers were created in Makerspace.

When she asked other library staff members if they might be willing to help if they had any extra time, the response was immediate. And enthusiastic.

Vanden Elzen and Maestre then set up four stations in front of the Makerspace to allow for social distancing. They filled the tables with the tools and supplies needed to make the visors, along with a container of sanitizing wipes. 

“I absolutely love what this project has turned into,” Vanden Elzen said. “It started with Erin Buenzli (director of wellness and recreation) reaching out to Kelvin and me in the Makerspace to see if we could help provide PPEs, and then it turned into this awesome community effort.”

The Makerspace-produced PPEs will benefit the Lawrence community without drawing down the supply elsewhere in the Fox Valley. Wellness Services has the growing inventory of ear savers, masks, and face shields. Department supervisors, employees, and students on campus can request them by using the mask-request web form or by e-mailing Buenzli.

“I’m excited to be using our resources so that we don’t use PPE supplies that are needed elsewhere,” Buenzli said. “The PPEs will help protect our essential workers, and the ear savers will create a better fitting and more comfortable mask.”

Vanden Elzen said the Makerspace is also ready to lend a hand if anyone on campus is in need of custom-built PPEs.

“If it’s something we can 3D print, sew, or laser cut, we’re happy to help,” she said.

The PPE project, Vanden Elzen said, is further evidence of what the Makerspace can become as technologies advance and more students embrace the possibilities.

“It seems like we’re learning new things all the time about what these tools can do,” she said.

“Making 200 shields has been a long process, but I already feel good knowing that our work will be directly helping other students stay safe,” Maestre said.

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

Lawrence students tap into creativity during summer of quarantine

Moreau Halliburton ’22 has channeled her love of beading into virtual classes for children.

Story by Awa Badiane ’21

Lawrence University students have been getting creative during this summer of quarantine.

The need to socially distance ourselves to minimize the spread of COVID-19 has drastically shifted the way we interact. Our new normal during the pandemic has had a direct impact on summer; most internships are now remote and many were outright canceled.

But Lawrentians, hunkered down at home, have not let this stop them from getting the most out of summer. They’ve launched online classes, followed their passions, honed their skills, and found new ways to connect. We’re sharing some examples here.

Beading, anyone?  

Moreau Halliburton ’22

Moreau Halliburton ’22 of Los Angeles has been beading for more than five years, and during our summer in quarantine has found a way to share that talent with the world.  

“I started an online beading camp for ages 7 to 13,” Halliburton said. “I order the supplies ahead of time, organize them into individual care packages, and send boxes to the kids who sign up. I teach them how to make simple jewelry, bake their own beads, and so much more.” 

Halliburton hosts a Zoom session with the campers once a week, teaching them a new beading skill each time. And outside of the Zoom sessions, the campers can continue learning, as Halliburton creates guided videos, Beading With Moreau, with step-by-step instructions.  

“I thought it would be difficult to teach young kids how to make jewelry online, but with a lot of thought and a little creativity, I cracked the code,” Halliburton said. “My camp has shown to be great for these times of separation because it creates this beautiful sense of community … through screens.” 

Halliburton’s old elementary school reached out and asked about hosting a virtual course for their summer camps. After hosting one course, Halliburton was all in.

“We’ve all been trained to push our creativity aside and settle down into jobs, but creativity is so important and valuable,” Halliburton said. “I bet people would get more job offers if they were more comfortable trying new things and weren’t afraid to unlock their creativity. I want kids to know that there are adults in the world using their art to make a difference, and they can do the same right now.” 

Halliburton has even found a way to teach the campers about what is happening in the world today through the classes.  

“An example is my Woke Beading Day theme, where I have my kids make pieces in relation to diversity and love across cultures, along with my Juneteenth Celebration Day theme,” Halliburton said. “I also brainstorm with the kids at the end of camp to think about something they love to do and how they can use that talent or activity to create positive change. They are so enthusiastic, which leaves me very hopeful for the future.” 

Joys of 3-D printing  

Prince Mukuna ’22

Prince Mukuna ’22 of Loganville, Georgia, first learned about 3-D printing in middle school, but he wasn’t able to use a 3-D printer until his first year at Lawrence. Now, during this summer in quarantine, Mukuna has lots of free time and has been getting creative with his own 3-D printer.  

“This technology allows me to bring ideas to life almost instantly – well, not quite instant,” Mukuna said. “During quarantine, I’ve been using a 3-D printer to print plant pots and planters for my mom’s small business, a printed football thigh pad model that can be used in a game, phone cases, wall decor, and oddly enough … a lamp shade.” 

Mukuna has used his 3-D printing skills as an outlet for his creativity and is even thinking of ways to bring it into the classroom.  

“I’m excited to see how I can use it more in my studies as well,” Mukuna said. “I enjoy the process of 3-D rendering to give ideas and thoughts real form.” 

Early childhood experience

Averie Miller ’22

Averie Miller ’22 of Chicago had plans to be a preschool teacher this summer, but that opportunity was canceled because of the pandemic. But this did not stop Miller from getting to do what she loves, working with kids.  

“I have picked up nannying for two amazing kids— one is 6 and the other is 2 years old,” said Miller. “I started June 15th; after my normal summer job of working with preschoolers was canceled, this family contacted me to help them out.”  

Miller has enjoyed the opportunity to care for the two kids and hopes to one day make caring for children her career.  

“I love what I’m doing since I’m planning to be an early childhood educator,” Miller said. “And we’ve done many fun things like bike riding around the neighborhood, swimming in the back yard, and playing games.” 

Care for your hair 

Willie Sturgis ’23

Willie Sturgis ’23 of Champaign, Illinois, has created a Hair Growth account on Instagram and other social media platforms with his younger sister, to share information on how to better take care of your hair.  

“We started this account in early July,” Sturgis said. “With prices rising and dropping, as well as people staying indoors, we understand that students and their families have major priorities in relation to spending and consuming, leaving hair care a priority toward the bottom of the list. Our goal is to offer free, simple ways a student can spend their money on natural, satisfying, yet cost-efficient products.”  

Their page, @willie.taylor.co, provides information on products, instructions for different hair styles, and tips for people with textured hair, making hair care a lot easier.   

“We wanted to share simple, natural ways students can maintain their hairstyles while handling their major priorities,” Sturgis said. “We love what we are doing, and we are getting a lot of feedback and starting to build an audience.”  

Daily journaling

Quentin Washington ’21

Trying to keep up with everything happening in the world right now can be overwhelming. Quentin Washington ’21 of New York recognized this and has taken on journaling to process everything. It’s a chance to de-stress.  

“I journaled to make sense of the world around me and my emotions related to what was happening,” Washington said. “I journaled about my friendships that were evolving, romantic relationships that ended, how I planned to enter my Spring Term with an online structure and readjusting to being back home in NYC. I would journal about once or twice a day.” 

Washington has used journaling as way to not only process everything in the present, but to also reflect on past experiences, providing a chance to grow.  

“I enjoy what I do because it’s a way to not only relieve stress, but also a time capsule in a sense,” Washington said. “I get to reflect on my life during different eras and see how I have grown as a person. I feel I have learned a lot about myself, who I was and where I want to go as I continue to write on a daily basis.” 

Staying connected

Sabrina Salas ’22

Staying connected with peers can be difficult these days. But Sabrina Salas ’22 of New York has made it part of her daily routine to stay connected with friends. 

“I’ve never been much of a texter, so it’s hard for me to reach out to a friend through text,” Salas said. “Instead, I call people. During quarantine, I got into the habit of Facetiming or being Facetimed by my friends all the time (both high school and college friends). Sometimes, I would speak to four or five people a day.” 

Salas has found ways to make short, quick interactions more meaningful by going the extra mile and calling or sending a voice note.

“I just prefer to hear people’s voices,” Salas said.  

“I am the kind of person who thrives off of other people’s energies, so my energy can drain pretty quickly when I’m not around people. Talking to other people instantly boosts my mood.” 

Awa Badiane ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Students pitch in to make cloth masks to keep Lawrence community safe

Members of the Lawrence community and visitors to campus have been asked to wear masks in shared spaces. Students in the costume shop, spread across the country, have pitched in by making more than 350 cloth masks. (Photo by Danny Damiani)

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

Being quarantined isn’t stopping Lawrentians from stepping up for the health and safety of the campus community. Six students employed in the costume shop have constructed more than 350 cloth face masks so far for students and staff who are on campus.

Director of Wellness and Recreation Erin Buenzli helped orchestrate the mask-making operation. With the threat of COVID-19 spread an ongoing concern and the need for masks to be worn in shared spaces on campus, she worked with Lawrence’s COVID-19 Management Team on the idea of supplying masks to Lawrence community members who need to be on campus. This idea reached the costume shop, where six students took on the challenge during Spring Term to make as many masks as they could.

“I love the collaboration and the ingenuity of students,” Buenzli said. “The fact that we can reach across departments to look at an issue and be creative and solve it. It’s been fun to be a part of.”

The masks have been distributed to students, faculty, and staff as needed. Signage has been placed throughout campus reminding anyone on campus grounds to wear a mask.

Five of the six students made the masks remotely from home and sent them to campus. The work continues this summer.

Andrea Lara ‘21 shipped her work from her Milwaukee home-turned-workspace. Combating a global pandemic by making more than 50 face masks probably wasn’t on her mind when she learned to sew in the costume shop in Fall 2017. But Lara embraced the work wholeheartedly.

For one, she’s always been driven by a simple desire to help others. Secondly, she’s seen the pandemic taking its toll around her in Milwaukee. That experience motivated her to be an agent of change.

“Sometimes it can feel overwhelming that I don’t have any power,” Lara said. “Sometimes the only way I feel like I can take control is to do something to help others stay safe.”

Lara is a psychology and theater double major. Like the other students involved in this project, she found a marriage between her education and reaching out to help others that goes beyond employing sewing skills.

“As a psych major, I really focus on the betterment of people,” Lara said. “In particular, disenfranchised people who don’t have access to resources. That’s really important to me. And as a costume designer and theater major, it’s important to show how well you can work and adapt under pressure.”

Never underestimate the influence of the good you put into the world. Lara’s 7-year-old brother has taken notice of her efforts.

“When he sees me making masks, he gets so excited and says, ‘We should make more so we can help more people.’ And that increases my excitement to try to help out.”

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

We miss you! Student writers long to return to these favorite spaces on campus

Hurvis Crossing leads into the patio outside The Café at Warch Campus Center. (Photo by Danny Damiani)

Story by Communications team

We’re all missing campus during Spring Term. With spring now fully in bloom, the yearning to walk the paths of campus, to kick back on Main Hall Green, or to enjoy food and conversation on the Warch Campus Center patio grows that much stronger.

We’ll be back together soon. We cannot wait. In the meantime, we asked the three student writers who work in the Communications office—Awa Badiane ’21, Alex Freeman ’23, and Isabella Mariani ’21—to share their favorite spaces on campus, inside or out. They’re all off campus this term as well, so this exercise provided a chance for the three of them to take their minds to some happy places.

Here are nine favorite student spaces, three from each writer, in no particular order.

1. Main Hall Green

This is a great place for studying with friends or taking naps on warm spring days. Or, just throw down a blanket, bring some snacks, and watch people walk by. There’s always a bustle of activity on Main Hall Green, from a Frisbee being tossed to music being played to games and festivals being held. (Isabella)

2. The path along the river

Whenever the warm weather arrives, I head down the staircase behind Sage Hall to the path that runs behind campus. The trees shading you from the sun and the sounds of the Fox River acting as a natural playlist make it the perfect spot to appreciate the hidden beauty of campus—either exploring with your friends or taking your own personal tour. (Alex)

3. SLUG hill

The hill overlooks the Sustainable Lawrence University Garden (SLUG), and it’s a great space all year round. During the warmer months in the fall and spring terms, you can lay out a blanket on the top of the hill to do some homework. You’ll have the best view of the Fox River. And during the winter months, the hill is perfect for snow tubing. (Awa)

4. The Café at Warch

I like going to The Café in the Warch Campus Center really early in the morning with the intention of doing assignments, then getting distracted and people-watching instead. Also good for late-night snack sessions with friends. Great seating inside. Even better seating outside when the weather warms up. (Isabella)

5. Top floor of Briggs

The top floor of Briggs Hall might just be the most underrated study spot on campus. It features floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking the Fox River. If you can snag a study table or armchair at sunset, you’re guaranteed an incredible view … which hopefully won’t distract you too much from that midterm essay. (Alex)

6. The Quad

In between all of the group houses on campus, you’ll find The Quad, a grassy hangout spot that beckons on a sunny day. Have a picnic or study amid the sunshine. The Quad also doubles as a concert venue. It is home to Lawrence’s annual LUaroo music festival, which, of course, we’re all missing this year. (Awa)

7. Fourth floor of Mudd Library

This is the best place to settle in to get some work done because it’s usually dead silent, which is something I lack here at home. The Mudd Library is filled with a variety of great spaces to study, read, or collaborate. But the fourth floor is my favorite. All that beautiful quiet. I can’t believe how much I miss it. (Isabella)

8. Memorial Chapel

There’s a reason that every major concert is held in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel—the impressive acoustics and elegant design cement its place as the best on-campus site to experience music in all of its glory. From student ensembles to Jazz Weekend performances (pictured) to the amazing talents showcased during the Artist Series, Memorial Chapel reminds us regularly that having a music conservatory here adds so much to the Lawrence experience. (Alex)

9. Diversity and Intercultural Center

Ever since my freshman year, the DIC has been a great hangout spot with friends. In between class or at the end of the day, we would come together in the DIC to do homework, watch a movie, or just bond. It is always lots of fun. Plus, the DIC is a prime event space for diversity-focused organizations on campus. (Awa)

Do you have a favorite spot on campus? Share it with us on Lawrence’s social media channels.