Tag: social media

Freedom Forum VP to speak at Lawrence: ‘It’s a scary time for the First Amendment’

Note: Weather conditions have resulted in Barbara McCormack’s flight being canceled. Her Feb. 12 visit to Lawrence has been rescheduled for 7:30 p.m. Feb. 19.

Barbara McCormack and her team at the Freedom Forum Institute are on a mission to teach people how to be better consumers of media.

That’s no small task.

“It’s a scary time for the First Amendment,” says McCormack, vice president of education at the nonprofit Freedom Forum.

Photo of Barbara McCormack
Barbara McCormack

She’ll bring her message about media literacy, politics and the challenges of navigating a free press to Lawrence University for a 7:30 p.m. Feb. 19 government colloquium in Room 102 of Steitz Hall. It is free and open to the public.

In an age when fake news is a thing, social media is a preferred outlet, news programs blur the lines between news and opinion, the president paints the media as enemies of the people and newsroom staffs are being downsized across the media landscape, the dangers of being lazy in your media consumption are real.

“Now, we’re all gatekeepers of information,” McCormack said. “With that, we all have to decide what to share, what not to share, what’s reliable, what’s not, and we’re doing this with no formal training. And not doing a very good job of it, quite honestly.”

Thus, McCormack and her team are on the road a lot. They have 35 workshops, classes or lectures scheduled during the first quarter of 2019. They meet with community groups, religious groups, students, journalists and more.

“Everyone is worried about this topic,” McCormack said. “We all understand the impact.”

She’s not here to tell you which news outlets you should trust. She’s here to push you to do the work so you can make informed decisions on your own. She hopes her lectures and workshops provide participants with the tools to do that. And when you find those outlets you trust, be confident enough to pony up for a subscription, digital or otherwise, to support the quality journalism they are doing.

The prevalence of fake news and the ease in which it’s created has added to the confrontational nature of today’s politics, said Arnold Shober, associate professor of government at Lawrence. He invited McCormack to Lawrence to further that conversation about blurred lines and how to navigate the daily onslaught of information so you become a better informed consumer, citizen and voter.

“We don’t know our politicians personally, at least most of us don’t,” Shober said. “The news is a filter we have.”

Besides its outreach work, the Freedom Forum operates the Newseum in Washington, D.C. It recently announced that it plans to sell the building that houses the decade-old museum dedicated to news and the First Amendment amid budget concerns.

It’s one more hit that speaks to the fractured financial state of media today. But it doesn’t diminish the message or slow the work the Freedom Forum is doing.

“We’re really hoping that by teaching media literacy, teaching responsibility to consumers, that along the way we will also instill an appreciation for the role a free press plays in our democracy,” McCormack said. “And hopefully send consumers out seeking quality news. We want them to have the skills to do that, to find those reliable sources.”

Navigating media

What: A Matter of Trust: Countering the Corrosive Effects of Polarization and Propaganda
Who: Barbara McCormack, Vice President of Newseum Education at the Freedom Forum Institute. She dives into the dark arts of media manipulation. Learn what propaganda is, how to spot it, and the roles news producers and consumers play in sustaining a healthy democracy.
When: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 19
Where: Room 102, Steitz Hall. It is free and open to the public.

Lawrence social media director wins national recognition

Lawrence University social media director Kasey Corrado has been named one of four national SimpsonScarborough Scholars by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE).

A Head shot of Lawrence University social media director Kasey Corrado.
Kasey Corrado

The program supports the professional development of promising communications and marketing practitioners in the educational advancement profession. CASE administers the scholarships, which are sponsored by SimpsonScarborough, an Alexandria, Va.-based communications and marketing consulting firm that specializes in higher education.

Corrado joined the Lawrence communications office in 2014 as the university’s first social media coordinator. She was promoted to social media director in 2016. She manages Lawrence’s primary Facebook and Twitter accounts as well as the university’s LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube, Snapchat, Pinterest and Tumblr channels.

Craig Gagnon, associate vice president of communications at Lawrence, cited Corrado for her initiative and success in developing and implementing a strategic social media program in nominating her for the award.

“Kasey is already a valuable part of the Lawrence staff,” said Gagnon, “and has the potential to become an industry leader as well as a campus leader.”

The SimpsonScarborough Scholars program is designed to nurture and sustain the professional development of the scholars, establish a network of scholars over time who become mentors to other promising newcomers, and support the communications and marketing disciplines overall.

As a scholar, Corrado will be eligible for several benefits, including attendance at the 2017 Summer Institute for Communications and Marketing, CASE’s flagship training program for newcomers to the communications/marketing field.

Joining Corrado as this year’s SimpsonScarborough Scholars are Daniel Baney, communications specialist, Northwest College in Powell, Wyo., Myrna Flynn, communications manager, Smith College in Northampton, Mass., and Paul Kingsmith, communications specialist, Lethbridge College in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

#Larry U: New Web page streamlines the Lawrence social media experience

Think of it as one-stop social media shopping for all things Lawrence University.

PrintIn conjunction with the start of the 2015-16 academic year, Lawrence has launched an aggregator page on its website that will house content related to the college collected from virtually all social media platforms.

Instead of searching Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube Tumblr and other channels to see what is happening, being said and posted about Lawrence, the aggregator page will consolidate all content that contains the hashtag #LarryU in a single location as a way to streamline the social media experience.

“#LarryU is an exciting new way to experience Lawrence University,” said Kasey Corrado, the college’s social media specialist. “There are so many stories, photos, videos and conversations being shared about Lawrence on social media channels. I have the privilege of seeing a lot of this content, but I cannot share all of it via our university-wide channels.Print

“But now, #LarryU allows us to bring all of that content to an easily navigable single spot for others to see, too,” she added. “The hub could feature a photo of a prospective student visiting campus for the first time and right next to it could be a selfie of an alumnus celebrating his 25th Reunion. #LarryU allows Lawrentians to engage with campus from anywhere in the world.”

Be sure to keep on top of all the latest Lawrence news and views by regularly visiting go.lawrence.edu/larryu.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.