Month: May 2019

2 Minutes With … Patrick Adu: Reviving the arts in his Sierra Leone homeland

2 Minutes With … is a series of short features to introduce us to the passions and interests of Lawrentians on and off campus. Find more 2 Minutes With … features here.

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

Sierra Leone was marred by an 11-year civil war from 1991 to 2002. In its wake, the war wiped out the country’s once-thriving theater culture. Seventeen years later, Lawrence University student Patrick Adu ’19 is leading the way to revive his country’s performing arts scene.

He’s starting Target Theatre, a nonprofit organization that aims to put public performances back on stages and reintroduce arts education in Sierra Leone’s schools.

A vibrant past

Prior to the civil war in Sierra Leone, theater was an essential medium for expressing views on a range of issues. No matter what the topic was, Patrick says theater was an integral part of people’s lives.

“(The impact) was very strong,” he says. “People loved it. People went to see it and get some information to take back home to create and start working on change.”

But the damage in the aftermath of the war was so immense that people forgot about plays. It was necessary to prioritize rebuilding roads, schools and hospitals. The performing arts were mostly pushed aside.

Now Patrick is bringing the former glory of Sierra Leone’s theater culture to the government’s attention with his plans for Target Theatre. He has communicated with some government officials who are ready to work with him. Other people back home are ready for the change, too, Patrick says. He receives encouraging social media engagement in response to his efforts.

“There are people who are very, very interested in reviving the arts there. They said, ‘We will work together and we’re happy you want to revive this stuff.’ So, I think I will have a good relationship and support from people back home.”

Beyond the stage

By reviving Sierra Leone’s theater culture, Target Theatre will create jobs and support the rising creative talents of the country’s youth.

Patrick explains the two primary steps that will guide his efforts: “Those performances, scripts, plays, should go back on stage. We want to revive the art of watching plays, actors acting in the entire country. And the second, to revive arts education. By that we can help youths. This is an ambitious project that has all these components, but we want to roll them out one step at a time.”

Equipped with his studies at Lawrence in theater arts and a passion for keeping theater alive around the world, Patrick plans on one day teaching theater arts at a university. But for now, Target Theatre has his full attention.

“It’s very important for arts education to come back to life,” he says.

If you’d like to support Patrick’s cause or find out more information, visit this link: www.gofundme.com/help-revive-theatre-in-sierra-leone

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

2 Minutes With … Maria Poimenidou: LUCC leader looks to do ‘amazing things’

Maria Poimenidou ’20 is president of the LUCC.

2 Minutes With … is a series of short features to introduce us to the passions and interests of Lawrentians on and off campus. Find more 2 Minutes With … features here.

Story by Awa Badiane ’21

Yes, running a student government — a $400,000 budget and oversight of all clubs, committees, and student-related activities on campus — can be a bit overwhelming. But Maria Poimenidou ’20 has it down to a science.

The Lawrence University biochemistry and economics double major from Thaso, Greece, says it’s all about staying organized and pushing past any fears or doubts.

“Whenever I am afraid of something, I force myself to do it,” she says. “I don’t want any fear I have to keep me from doing amazing things.” 

The Lawrence University Community Council (LUCC) plays a huge role in decision making and oversight on campus. It operates as a shared governance council, meeting weekly and helping to shape campus climate. As president, Maria oversees all that activity.  

“The role of the president is overseeing all of that and keeping the big picture in mind and seeing how different things can occur through legislation or different events,” Maria says.    

Right at home

Maria was part of her student government in high school. When first coming to Lawrence from Greece, Maria became a freshman class representative as a way to make Lawrence “feel more like home.”  

Her role in LUCC then evolved from a way to make friends and get involved to finding a way to make positive change on campus. 

“I remember going to general council and not knowing what was happening,” Maria says. “Over the years that changed, I started to see things that can be improved.”

Maria stayed on the council as a sophomore class representative, then was elected vice president, then president.  

Maria has kept a can-do mindset throughout her LUCC journey. Leading up to her position as president, she ran for various offices a total of five times. She keeps running and stays involved because she is determined to create positive change on campus, she says. It’s only a few months into her presidency, but she’s already increased student engagement and improved the function of LUCC committees by creating a cabinet position that focuses on that.

Be calm, stay organized

As one can imagine, being a student — a double major, no less — and running the LUCC is a full load. We asked Maria for five tips on handling a busy schedule:  

1: Do not be afraid to ask for help.

2: Prioritize what is important.

3: Create a schedule, and follow it.

4: Listen to yourself.

5: Take time for you.  

Awa Badiane ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

2 Minutes With … De Andre King: Turntable, headphones and a desire to entertain

De Andre King poses for a photo in the Lawrence radio station studio.
De Andre King ’20 has channeled his love of music into a DJ’ing enterprise called King SZN.

2 Minutes With … is a series of short features to introduce us to the passions and interests of Lawrentians on and off campus. Find more 2 Minutes With … features here.

Story by Awa Badiane ’21

Being entrusted with the aux cord in any situation is an honor, but to be trusted with controlling the music at almost every campus event is a sign of huge respect … and talent.

De Andre King ’20 has gone from being an Aux at small-scale Lawrence University fraternity parties to launching a DJ’ing enterprise, King SZN, that has him traveling the Midwest. 

Music for the computer science major from New York City is never far away.

“That’s one of the first things I check for when I leave my room, my headphones,” he says. 

De Andre’s passion for music started young. He recalls listening to WWPR-FM 105.1 in NYC while on the school bus. Coming from both New York City and a Caribbean household, different styles and genres of music have always been present in his life.

Filling a void

That passion for music followed him to Appleton, where he quickly created a platform to share his music with others on campus.

“My first weekend here, I remember calling my friends back home, ‘I DJ’d a party here on campus.’ I was really just using my phone. I had thought that was DJ’ing at the time.”  

It took off from there. Now, at almost every campus event you will see De Andre controlling the turntables. He’s also been a frequent voice on WLFM.

De Andre said he set out to fill a void after seeing “a need for actual disc jocking.” He watched YouTube videos, shadowed veteran DJs during their sets, and learned by trial and error.

“Mixing, blending, beating, matching, crowd control, energy, and overall passion of music,” he says of the learning process.

He has become an established name on campus. From hosting Lawrence’s first-ever Tailgate to Lawrence International’s annual Fall Formal, De Andre has filled the void he first noticed as a freshman. Today, he goes beyond the boundaries of Lawrence, creating his own brand with King SZN Enterprise, traveling and sharing his talent across the Midwest, and even performing on trips back to New York.

“It’s a blessing if you had asked freshman year Dre DJ’ing in Sig Ep,” he says. “… If you would have told him you are going to be doing gigs outside of Lawrence throughout the Appleton community, but also back home in New York, I would have been in disbelief.” 

He now spends most weekends traveling to host events at other schools. It’s a huge commitment, but he’s made it look effortless. He’s found his groove.

“Never really think about it, I just try and do,” he says.  

Take a spin

Looking for new music? You’re in luck, we asked De Andre to give us some of his favorite music to rock out to. 

Song on repeat: Hustle and Motivate, by Nipsey Hussle 

First favorite song: Rockin That Thang, by The-Dream 

Favorite gym song: Hustle and Ambition, by 50 Cent  

Favorite DJs: DJ ByFarMega, DJ TrueBlends , DJ Tech 12, DJ Iz Lit, DJ Jhasire Powell  

Awa Badiane ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

2 Minutes With … Mads Layton: Fashion, theater passions merge backstage

Mads Layton works on a dress in the theater costume shop at Lawrence.
Mads Layton ’22 combines interests in fashion and live theater in the Lawrence costume shop. Here she works on a costume for “She Ventures and He Wins,” showing Thursday through Saturday at Stansbury Theater.

2 Minutes With … is a series of short features to introduce us to the passions and interests of Lawrentians on and off campus. Find more 2 Minutes With … features here.

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

Have you enjoyed recent Lawrence theater productions such as Mass and Pippin? Perhaps you’ve wondered how those amazing costumes are created.

Mads Layton ’22 works in the costume shop; she’s here to take us inside and raise the curtain on the work she does to prepare for the shows we love.

The English major’s two greatest passions are fashion and live theater, so she’s a great fit for the costume shop. She started working there after Pippin ran its last show in the fall, sorting old costumes for washing and getting ready for an upcoming play on the bill, She Ventures and He Wins.

More on the Theatre Arts program at Lawrence here.

Initial decisions

Costuming normally begins after the cast has been determined and characters are developed. Before anything new is made, students pull what they can from a stock of costumes in storage. However, some productions like She Ventures and He Wins require large builds of new costumes. This calls for early preparations, such as a tailoring tutorial for waistcoats in winter term. Mads began work on the play shortly after she started working at the costume shop.

“Actually, the first thing I made was in preparation for this show because we knew it would be a really big build,” she says. “We didn’t have a lot of stuff from that time period, so they had us starting early.”

She made a skirt with box pleats, and 10 feet of box trim for one of the lead’s dresses.

She Ventures and He Wins, a Restoration-era comedy, will be presented this week. The show — and its spectacular costumes — will be on stage in Stansbury Theater at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday.

Mads Layton works on the trim of a costume in the theater costume shop.
Mads Layton on putting her skills to work in the theater costume shop at Lawrence University: “I really enjoy doing detail work and hand-sewing, so I get a lot of hand-stitching of hems, as well as trims.”

Team effort

Students in the costume shop don’t tackle full garments alone. Instead they’re assigned tasks based on their skill level, and the garment is pieced together in the end.

Mads, who came to Lawrence from Mesa, Arizona, may be new to costume-making but she’s confident in the sewing abilities she learned from her mom, who taught her and her sisters at a young age.

“I really enjoy doing detail work and hand-sewing, so I get a lot of hand-stitching of hems, as well as trims,” she says. “Other than that, I’ve made a lot of skirts this year.”

For Mads, learning new ways to create garments is a perk of the job. She had never worked with pleats before, and now that dress is her favorite costume she’s worked on.

“I did seven or eight hours of just doing box pleats, and then I had to sew them on,” she says. “It’s just a beautiful dress. I have a little bit of an attachment to that one because I spent so much time on it.”

When the director delivers final notes on the costumes, and last alterations are made, it’s showtime. Mads has always supported the art form she loves, and working in the costume shop allows her to see her creative work in action onstage.

“I make sure to go to all the shows because I love live theater,” she says. “I think it’s important and wonderful.”

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.