Tag: Tim Troy

Theatre Arts Professor Tim Troy Discusses “War of the Worlds” Hoax; WPR Comes to Lawrence Oct. 28 for Live Broadcast

Lawrence theatre arts professor Tim Troy will be the guest on this Sunday’s (Oct. 27) broadcast of Wisconsin Public Radio’s “University of the Air.”

Tim-Troy_Newsblog
Professor Tim Troy talks about the “War of the Worlds” broadcast Sunday, Oct. 27 on Wisconsin Public Radio’s “University of the Air” program.

Troy joins hosts Norman Gilliland and Emily Auerbach at 4 p.m. for an hour-long discussion of one of broadcasting’s greatest hoaxes, Orson Welles’ broadcast of “The War of the Worlds” in commemoration of the 75th anniversary of the famous Oct. 30, 1938 Mercury Theatre airing of an adaptation of H. G. Wells’ novel “The War of the Worlds.”

Check your local listing or listen online at http://www.WPR.org/

Norman Gilliland will come to Lawrence on Monday, Oct. 28 for a live broadcast of his show “The Midday” from 12 noon to 1 p.m. in Harper Hall in the Music-Drama Center. The public is invited to attend, admission is free.

The broadcast will feature three musical performances by Lawrence students:

• Jonathan Fagan, jazz and classical piano

• the Quartet Masque  —Andrea Johnson and Sophie Yang, violin; Kyle Stalsberg, viola and Mariatonia Longhi, cello

• the bluegrass quartet Involuntary String Band — Martha McDonnell, fiddle, Davey Harrison, mandolin, Ilan Blanck, guitar and Nick Allen, bass.

The program also will be taped by Wisconsin Public Television for a future broadcast.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

New Student Playwriting Series Honors Former Theatre Professor

Three original one-act plays will be presented in Lawrence University’s first biennial Fred Gaines Student Playwrights Series Feb. 28-March 2 in the Cloak Theatre of the Music-Drama Center, 420 E. College Ave.

Tickets, at $10 for adults, $5 for seniors and students, are available at the Lawrence University Box Office, 920-832-6749.

The series, which honors former theatre professor and department chair Fred Gaines (1977-2000), who passed away in 2010, features the work of juniors Emma Brayndick and Zachary Cooper and 2012 graduate Reena Novotnak, who is participating in a year-long internship at The Playwrights Center in Minneapolis, in one night of student-written theatre.

Cooper’s “It’s All Happening at the Zoo” takes place during one frustrating rehearsal of Edward Albee’s famous absurdist play “The Zoo Story.” Brayndick’s “Shifts” is a half-hour slice of life that explores relationship dynamics of four characters in a small used bookstore. “While Our Eyes Adjust,” written by Novotnak, examines the emotional lives of three young art students.

Brayndick said her “Shifts” was inspired by a discussion of the dichotomy between a private conversation and a public setting.

“I had a thought for a couple of characters working in a bookstore and it just sort of grew from there,” said Brayndick, who is neither directing or acting in “Shifts.” “The ‘take home’ message, as corny as it might seem, is be yourself and surround yourself with the people who understand and encourage that you, whoever that may be.”

While she enjoyed writing the play, Brayndick said it’s been even more fun watching it come to life in rehearsals.

“As an actress I have always worked with words from the other side, so it has been an interesting challenge to write a play, but very rewarding to find out that it works outside of my head. That actors can take something that was once just a germ of an idea I had and fill it with life is very rewarding.”

Timothy X. Troy, professor of theatre arts and 1985 Lawrence graduate, launched the play-writing series as a tribute to his former teacher and later department colleague.

“My dear hope is that through our biennial Gaines Series, I can pay forward some of the wisdom I learned from Fred by guiding young artists who are making theatre with each other, for each other,” said Troy.

The three plays selected for the inaugural Gaines Student Playwrights Series were culled from works that originated in Troy’s 2012 play writing class.

“Each class member, all the faculty and staff of the theatre arts department voted on a slate of three plays they thought would work best together as an evening of engaging theatre.”

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2013 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.

Tim Troy’s “The Life of Me” Gets Reading at Minneapolis Theatre

The latest playwriting project of Tim Troy, professor of theatre arts at Lawrence University, “The Life of Me,” will be performed Monday, Dec. 19 at the Playwrights Center in Minneapolis, Minn., as part of the company’s Members Stage Reading series.  The reading, at 6:30 p.m., is free and open to the public.

Professor of Theatre Arts Tim Troy

The reading, which explores many of the cultural and political conflicts that marked the period from 2003-05, features Katie Hawkinson ’09 in the role of Julie and veteran Milwaukee area actor Jacque Troy in the lead role of Kate, along with some of the Twin Cities best actors. An earlier version of the play was presented at Lawrence in the spring of 2006.

A parent’s capricious demand to inflate her son’s grade threatens Kate’s career. Surrounded by eclectic siblings who’ve conspired to reconcile an on-going family crisis, Kate desperately seeks renewed stability in her personal and professional relationships. She turns to art, literature and religion to lead her past doubt, learning that even a middle school teacher is vulnerable to those who will use faith as a weapon.

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

Tim Troy Play Gets Professional Reading at Minneapolis Theatre

The Playwrights’ Center in Minneapolis will conduct a reading of Professor of Theatre Arts Tim Troy’s latest play “Radio & Juliet” Monday, March 14 at 6:30 p.m. as part of its Early Stage Reading program.

Tim Troy

The reading, which is free and open to the public, will allow Troy to hear and evaluate this still developing work for a fresh audience. A short discussion follows the reading.

Inspired by Troy’s passion for radio drama and his participation in a 2009 Lawrence-sponsored trip to China to study water resource management, the play takes place in the aftermath of an environmental crisis.

Two citizen classes inhabit the Great Lakes Basin: “Arids” occupy the recently exposed lakebed while “Old Shores” protect the fresh water supply. Juliet falls for a New Shore pirate broadcaster who defies her widowed father, a police detective who protects the endangered natural resources. “Radio & Juliet” re-imagines Shakespeare’s themes in a cautionary tale with shades of George Orwell amid the workings of an elusive crime spree only Juliet can solve.

Written in early 2010, a draft of “Radio and Juliet” was first read last April on campus in Harper Hall.