Winter Break Hours & Services

Exterior photo of the Mudd Library in winter with snow covering the ground, tree branches, and blue library sign.Now that fall term is wrapping up, it’s time to start thinking about special D-Term and winter break hours.

  • Tuesday, November 20th (the last day of final exams), 8 a.m. until 9 p.m.
  • 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, November 21
  • Closed Thursday, November 22 through Sunday, November 25th
  • Beginning Monday, November 26, we’ll be open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • Closed from Saturday, December 22 through Tuesday, January 1.
  • We’ll be open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, December 2.

Academic year library hours will resume on Thursday, January 3.

Your friends in the Mudd will be here to help you prepare for next term (we’re talking to you faculty, students, and staff) or to catch up on some books and movies.

Taking a D-Term class? Our reference librarians are on call from 8:30 am through 4:30 p.m. to support any D-Term reference needs. You’re also welcome to check out some movies, CDs, video games (and a Nintendo Wii system), board games, musical scores, and of course, books.

Off campus? Most of our databases can be access from off campus! You can continue to do research, or enjoy some great plays, operas, documentaries, and much more from our streaming media databases. Interlibrary loan articles may also be requested over breaks, even if you’re off campus.

As always, we’re here to help- so if there are any ways your friends in the Mudd Library can help you, just ask!

New York Times Election Resources

As you may know, the Mudd Library and Warch Campus Center provide a free New York Times subscription to all Lawrence University students, faculty, and staff.

Just sign up on campus at nytimes.com/passes with your Lawrence email address (your account may be accessed off-campus once it’s been created). The subscription provides access to the electronic version from a browser and through NYTimes mobile applications.

Below is a list of features that may be especially helpful for staying informed for the November 6th midterm elections (compiled and annotated by The New York Times staff):

    • The Upshot – News, analysis and graphics about politics, policy and everyday life. Subscribe to the newsletter as well.
    • Elections – News about elections, including commentary and archival articles published in The New York Times.
    • The ArgumentNew York Times Opinion columnists explain an argument from each side of the political spectrum, so you can decide where you stand and how to persuade the opposition. Check out the section and podcast.
    • The Daily podcast – This is how the news should sound. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week. Tune in along with five million monthly unique listeners.
    • Race/Related – A weekly newsletter focused on race, identity and culture.

Prefer a different news resource? The Mudd Library subscribes to a wide variety of newspapers in both paper and electronic formats!

Refugee Symposium Resources in the Library

Sign with a title that reads Lawrence University is hosting the symposium, Seeking Refuge: Local and Global Perspectives, from November 4 through November 6, 2018. This symposium is meant to bring awareness of the global issue of the refugee crisis by hosting discussions with community featuring guests with a wide range of backgrounds in helping refugees and who are refugees themselves. The schedule for the symposium can be viewed on the Refugee Symposium webpage.

The library is providing a variety of resources to support this symposium:

Seeking Refuge Research & Materials Guide
This guide contains links to many resources available in the library and online for those who would like to continue their enrichment about the topic of refugees. In addition to books, movies, and journals, the guide also contains links to our music databases to a selection of songs played at the refugee symposium concert.

Wood and glass display case containing images of refugees and resources.Display Exhibit:
The display contains powerful photographs and news headlines that illustrate the refugee plight, facts about refugees around the world, and tips for finding related resources in the library catalog and OneSearch.

Book Display:
All along the top of the newspaper and popular magazine shelf, we’ve placed a selection of library materials about the refugee experience. No need to search or go upstairs to find materials, just grab some books you’d like to read from this display and sit down to read them, or check them out at the circulation desk.

Your friends in the Mudd Library are glad to be supporting a symposium on such an important topic and to help with continuing the discussion.

In the Mudd Gallery: History of the Hysterical

The first Mudd Gallery show of the 2018-2019 school year is set up and ready to be viewed! The show, History of the Hysterical, is a grouping of works by Lawrence student Meryl Louise Carson.

The opening reception is on Friday, October 26th at 4:30 pm. Carson’s exhibit will be on display from October 23-29.

The Mudd Gallery is located on the third floor of the Mudd Library.

Alumni Librarians: Elizabeth Bast ’89

Image of Elizabeth BastEditor’s note: We invited Lawrence alumni who have gone into library work to share with us what they do and how they got there.  Here’s another in a series.

Envy. I admit it. That’s what I feel when I think about students in college and graduate school today considering entering the library field (including my son, a current student at Lawrence). Not to be too “back in my day” about it, but when I attended Lawrence in the late ‘80s I can positively state that being a librarian never entered my mind. Don’t get me wrong, I loved my local public library in West Bend, Wisconsin and was a frequent visitor to my school libraries and even the good old Mudd while a student at Lawrence, but it’s hard to describe to students today how much technology and culture have transformed libraries (and the role of the librarian).

Quiet. Sedate. Solitary. The libraries I used to know were filled with knowledge but were not particularly dynamic places. Going to the library (of any kind) meant entering a serious place where mostly silent, individual exploration took place. The stereotypical librarian was a “shusher” with glasses and a prim demeanor. She (typically) served in a gatekeeper role where orderly systems of classification ruled and being a patron had a definite “supplicant” feel. It was not a world I ever envisioned finding the most engaging, dynamic, and fulfilling career of my life. And yet…

If I could have majored in “Liberal Arts” at Lawrence I would have. I was interested in everything and took as long as I possibly could to pick a major, and even then chose one that spanned two disciplines (back then Lawrence had an Anthropology/Sociology department). Plus I threw in an Education minor and earned my teaching license in 7-12 Broad Fields Social Studies. Lawrence made it very difficult to leave the world of learning, so even though I was prepared to enter the classroom as a teacher, I decided to extend my studies into graduate school and entered the Masters in Sociology program at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where I completed the program with a thesis based on original research on the topic of urban education. After getting married and moving to New York City so my new husband could pursue graduate studies, I entered the world of publishing as an editorial assistant for an editor working on academic titles in the fields of Sociology and Philosophy, while I spent nights teaching GED and ESL classes at a non-profit community organization. Upon returning to Wisconsin three years later I took a job as an academic advisor with a program called Upward Bound, run out of the University of Wisconsin-Sheboygan campus and three years after that I became pregnant with my first child and found myself moving again so my husband could pursue his career. Whew.

Taking time off from paid employment to be a stay-at-home parent to my two children was definitely not time wasted (in fact I highly recommend it if money and circumstance allow), but it did create a sizable hole in my resume when I decided to return to the work world when my younger child started Kindergarten. I knew I wanted a career again, a profession that would be part of my identity and allow me to fulfill my potential. Traditional teaching was obviously an option, but I didn’t have the same passion for it that I did when I was younger. I considered other roles within the education field, such as counselor, or reading specialist, because I had really enjoyed the one-on-one relationships I built with students when I worked for Upward Bound, but I knew I needed to go back to school on some level to refresh my knowledge and credentials before anyone would hire me.

I turned to the website for the UW-Milwaukee Graduate School to see what programs were available that might allow me to combine taking courses in-person with an online component, because I still had young kids and driving 35 miles from my home in Racine, Wisconsin was not always possible. It is there, while perusing the various programs, that I first laid eyes on the School of Information Studies (SOIS). Have you ever had one of those moments where everything just came into focus? I was excited and surprised. Course titles like The Organization of Information, Information Access and Retrieval, Metadata, and Information Ethics intrigued me. What sold me was the ability to combine a Masters in Library and Information Science (MLIS) with the certification for a School Library Media Specialist license (K-12) by taking courses like Library Services for Children and Young Adults and Multicultural Children’s Literature. It felt like a great fit, so I enrolled in January of 2008 and never looked back.

How had this field escaped my attention all this time? Well, a little thing called the Internet took over the world in the time since I left Lawrence in 1989, and libraries and librarians have been leading the way as innovators and navigators of this brave new world. Now I work as a Library Media Specialist (sometimes referred to as Teacher Librarian) in a public middle school serving more than 800 students in a very culturally and economically diverse community. I am certainly proud of the collection of books I have selected and curated over the years but I am not the English-major book nerd that is often part of the librarian profile. I approach my profession as a Lawrence graduate, a liberal arts nerd who is fascinated by and knowledgeable about many different fields and topics. I collaborate with my social studies, math, science, art, music, and even gym teachers as much as I do my English faculty. The online world is a wonderful and terrifying place for kids and adults and a large part of my value to my school is my ability to make technology and digital information accessible, manageable, and meaningful. I collaborate, I troubleshoot, I teach, I counsel, I provide inspiration and sometimes refuge. Every day is a different schedule and a different challenge. I get to know and serve every student and teacher in my building. I also have chosen to participate in my profession by serving on task forces and committees for the American Library Association (ALA) and the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), which is just the cherry on top of my already awesome job because I get to know and work with amazing librarians from around the country. (I’m currently serving on the Odyssey Award 2019 committee which selects the best audiobook created for children each year).

So, yeah. Do I wish I had found this career earlier? Absolutely, but I also recognize that the school library of my childhood was nothing like the one I work in today, so I just have to be grateful that I’m able to spend the 2nd half of my working life in a job I truly love (and also a little envious of those who can embark on a vital career in libraries right out of college).

By Elizabeth Bast, Class of 1989

Welcome Week 2018 Events

Image of a map on display and Welcome Week, one of our favorite weeks of the year, is coming up soon! We’re hosting or taking part in all kinds of events to welcome new students along with families and friends to campus.

Below is a lineup of the major events! In addition to these, we’ll also be meeting with sports teams and Waseda students!

Tuesday, September 4th

Resources Fair, 11:30 am to 1 pm (Campus Center): Be sure to visit your soon-to-be friends from the Mudd Library at our table.

Parents, Family & Friends Library Drop-In, 1 pm to 3 pm: While new students are off doing activities, come to the library and make yourselves comfortable, wander around, grab a magazine or newspaper, relax in the Milwaukee-Downer Room, use our wireless, and sip some coffee or tea. Enjoy our library!

Thursday, September 6th

Welcome to the Mudd Open House, 9 am to 12 pm: Stop by the Mudd and meet the people who can help you succeed. Not only can you find out about the library (both online and offline), take a tour, and enjoy some food—you can build with Legos, make origami bookmarks, play on the Wii, and more! It’s both fun and educational—and you can’t beat that.

Friday, September 7th

Getting to know the library presentations and tours, beginning at 1:30. Get off to the best start by learning all about what the Mudd Library can do to help you succeed. Each session will last approximately 20 minutes. Come to as many as you’d like!

  • 1:30 pm, What’s the Mudd
  • 1:50 pm, Tour the Mudd
  • 2:00 pm Scores and CDs and Streaming, oh my!
  • 2:30 pm, What’s the Mudd?
  • 2:50 pm, Tour the Mudd
  • 3 pm Scores and CDs and Streaming, oh my!
  • 3:30 pm, What’s the Mudd?
  • 3:50 pm, Tour the Mudd
  • 4:00 pm, Scores and CDs and Streaming, oh my!

Read the whole schedule on the Welcome Week events page. Want to know more about the library, visit our welcome students page.

Welcome the Lawrence University, new students! We’re looking forward to meeting you!

 

Summer in the Mudd Library

Your friends in the Mudd Library will be here for you all summer! How can we help?

Need a space to get some work done?
The library will be open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. It’s especially quiet in here over the summer if you’re looking for a quiet place to get work done. Take a look at the many types of spaces in the library to find your favorite.

Need something to read/watch/listen to/play?
We have lots of popular novels, interesting non-fiction books, movies, documentaries, theatrical productions, CDs, musical scores, etc, that can be checked out! Off campus? Use your Lawrence login to access one of our many streaming media databases to watch opera from the Met, movies, documentaries, and more!

Doing research?
Our friendly reference librarians are on call and ready to help Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. through 4 p.m all summer long! Off campus? Call, email, or chat!

Want to make something?
Our makerspace is available during all library hours to those who’ve been trained, and those who haven’t can contact makerspace@lawrence.edu to set up a training session. It’s available to all Lawrence faculty, staff, and students to enhance the creativity of their work here.

Want to learn something?
We have a great lineup in our annual summer coffeehouse series! This summer, we’re calling it Mudd and Friends, as we’ll also be joined by faculty from around campus who’ll share some of their lesser-known expertise.
Here’s a sneak peek:

  • July 11: Garth Bond, “How we got to Russia 2018: A Brief History of International Soccer.”
  • July 18: Summer Reading!
  • July 25: Erin Dix, “An interactive session in which attendees will get a chance to work directly with materials from the Archives.”
  • August 1: Beth Zinsli, “A completely non-scientific, totally delicious introduction to a few fermented foods – including recipes!”
  • August 8: Antoinette Powell, “What’s all this I hear about the Fox River? Who owned my house? What was Appleton before it was Appleton? The Mudd Library can answer these and many other questions with its collections and electronic resources. Get ready to dive into local history in the Mudd.
  • August 15: Bruce Hetzler, “Neurobiology of Stroke”
  • August 22: Angela Vanden Elzen, “Makerspace and Pedagogy: How to Integrate the LU Makerspace into your Courses; or, How can this stuff be used with Classes and Stuff?”

OneSearch Tips & Tools: Renewing Library Items

Did you know that you can renew library items online? Just follow the following quick steps, and you’ll be on your way!

Step 1: From the library home page, click My Library Account (or just got directly to the My Library Account page).

Step 2: Log in with your Lawrence University username and password

Step 3: Either click Renew All, or click the box next to the item(s) you’d like to renew, and click Renew Selected.

And your items are renewed! Any questions or problems, contact the circulation desk at 920-832-6750, or email a member of our circulation department.

Student Research in the Library: John O’Neill

John O’Neill is a double-degree student from Reno, Nevada. He’s been at Lawrence for five years and will earn his BM in French Horn Performance and his BA in Russian and Government in a just few short weeks!

John is also a much-beloved library student worker, and has been the night supervisor at the Circulation Desk. He definitely knows his way around the Mudd and offers great insight into using the library to your best advantage.

Upon being asked what he would like his fellow students to know about the Mudd Library, he responded,

“Get to know the staff, don’t be afraid to ask questions, and always go upstairs to find your own books because you will come down with an entire stack of useful materials.”

Read on to learn more about John and the fascinating and important research he’s been pursuing in the Mudd!

DSC04921
John O’Neill holds a 2002 issue of Appleton’s local newspaper, The Post Crescent, which he used to research Appleton’s sister city, Kurgan, Russia.

John, what are your plans after graduation?

I am planning to travel to Ukraine for the summer to work with an NGO there that works with under-served regions of the country. After that I will be back in Appleton and hopefully onto Chicago in the fall.

What have you been researching in the Mudd Library?

Over the past two terms I have been working on my senior experience in government. For this project I am profiling the Fox Cities-Kurgan Sister City Relationship. The partnership had an astonishing period of peak activity from the 1990s through 2013, but it has since been dormant. Some of the partnership’s major accomplishments included a 2003 security summit hosted in Appleton with keynote from Mikhail Gorbachev, opening of medical facilities and a domestic violence shelter in Kurgan, obtaining funding for a project to decommission a significant stockpile of chemical weapons in the Kurgan region, and over 100 educational exchanges between universities, high schools, and middle schools in both regions.

What library materials and resources have been the most useful to you in pursuing this research?

For this project I ended up using a wide variety of resources that the library offers students. I took advantage of the main collection, ILL, and electronic databases for most of my background research. Later, I relied on our wonderful reference librarians, who pointed me to contacts at the Appleton Public Library and the Appleton Historical Society. Finally, I learned to be grateful for the VCRs and microform readers that the library makes available to students. Most of my resources were on VHS tapes from the 90s, so having those VCRs on hand was absolutely fantastic.

What are you hoping to learn or gain from this research?

One of my main objectives was to learn how sustainable local organizations are built. This involved finding out how Fox Cities-Kurgan got its start, what program leaders hoped to accomplish, and why it eventually entered a decline. As I progressed in my research I found many other sister cities around the country with similar stories of huge growth followed by a swift decline. This led me to ask just how much these relationships are subject to the broader political climate and what their place is in the global geopolitical environment.

Why do you think this research is important?

For me, The Fox Cities-Kurgan Partnership has been an inspirational example of international partnership that transcends political boundaries. Not only did the program accomplish some enormous objectives that we wouldn’t normally associate with smaller towns like Appleton, but it also forged lasting friendships between the countless exchange participants, volunteers, host families, and students who were involved. By increasing awareness of the program I hope to re-spark the interest in international advocacy that the program was founded around.

How did you become interested in this line of research?

A couple of years ago I found the partnership’s website, which hadn’t been updated since 2013. I later tried to search for Kurgan on the Post Crescent’s website, but due to archiving of the newspaper, my search returned no results. The disappearance of this program from the public eye made me a little sad and I began reaching out to program leaders and participants to find out more.

John, this sounds like really important work. We are so excited to see where you take what you’ve learned and to see the grand adventures that are in store for you! Thank you for sharing.

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Alumni Librarians: Emily Passey Vieyra ‘08

Emily (right) with celebrity librarian and author, Nancy Pearl

Editor’s note: We invited Lawrence alumni who have gone into library work to share with us what they do and how they got there.  Here’s another in a series. 

Thanks to the librarian alums who have gone before me on this blog and set the tone of telling the interesting story of how they came to be a librarian! It is one of those professions that prompts that question. From the outside, it’s not totally clear what librarians do. So it’s even less clear why or how someone came to find themselves in the role (other than being big readers, which not all librarians are.)

So here’s my story. During my four years at Lawrence, I was always on what felt like a pretty clear path: I would get really good grades, get my BA, and then go to grad school.

Senior year, I was nearing the end of that path. I had decided to explore journalism after a few years writing and editing for The Lawrentian. I was also armed with the knowledge that, despite working on an Honor’s Project in English, I did not want to pursue higher education in that subject because I did not want to be a professor. After a trip to New York City to explore NYU’s journalism program, I was totally disillusioned. I had a Rory Gilmore moment while there. I was used to being a sort of big fish at a small high school and then in the English department at Lawrence, but visiting a top journalism school in the Big Apple I felt like a single-celled organism floating in the Pacific Ocean. And I felt as spineless as one, too. In the end I graduated and then moved home with no plan.

Through twists and turns, I found myself 18 months post-Lawrence doing the tremendously unsatisfying work of a classified ad salesperson at a newspaper in North Dakota. One day I was walking my dogs and listening to a podcast of the public radio show, To The Best of Our Knowledge (produced right here in Wisconsin!). They were talking about public libraries, and profiled a book called This Book is Overdue! which I promptly went to the library to check out. In pretty quick succession, I applied for grad school, moved to Illinois, and spent two amazing years at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign studying library science and working as a graduate assistant at the Undergraduate Library. Yes, Lawrentians: they have one whole library just for undergrads! Big schools are so weird!

Now, I am the Assistant Director at Shorewood Public Library.

A few important things happened along the way to becoming a librarian, many of them at Lawrence. I’ll use these experiences to give you an idea of what a librarian does, at least this librarian.

I didn’t have one of those highly coveted jobs at the Mudd, but my jobs on campus gave me what turned out to be relevant experience for what I do as a librarian. Editing at The Lawrentian taught me to work strategically with a team, focus my creativity and turn work around quickly for a deadline. Tutoring at the Center for Teaching and Learning taught me to communicate tricky concepts in easy to understand ways, lead by example, and engage the learner in the process. I call on the multi-dimensional education I got at Lawrence when someone asks me for help finding a definition of modernism in poetry, or finding information on African explorers in the New World, or when I select new music for our collection, or when I write and edit library policies and procedures, or when I have to clean up puke. If only I were joking.

When a young woman asked me recently why people started writing books (I can’t make this stuff up), the librarian in me had the patience and forethought to answer her question as simply as I could (no library patron needs to hear a dissertation, but many want to give you one), but it was the Lawrentian in me who had the knowledge and confidence to answer.

By Emily Passey Vieyra, Class of 2008