Author: Angela Vanden Elzen

New-look Library OneSearch goes live Sunday, 9/15!

We’re pleased to announce that Library OneSearch will have a new look as the school year begins! The new look will go live Sunday, September 15, 2019.

OneSearch’s current interface is four years old this fall (that’s about 100 in internet years) and, based on user research, Ex Libris (our system vendor) has made some refinements to the product that will improve your library research experience.

Functionality remains much the same: you’ll still be able to search the Library’s catalog PLUS hundreds of thousands of articles, images, etc. at the same time, link to full-text when it’s available, see what you have checked out, renew your Library materials, and much, much more. It just looks a little different.

The official debut isn’t till Sunday, but you can have a sneak peek right now by visiting the new-look link:

Link to the New-look Library OneSearch

Be sure to sign in and check out My Favorites (pushpin icon) and My Library Card (Menu > card icon). All your saved records and searches have migrated from old E-Shelf & Queries to My Favorites. All your loans, requests, etc. have migrated from old My Account to My Library Card. (You’ll note that the old folders metaphor from e-Shelf has been dropped in favor of “labels.” But no worries: labels work the same way folders did.)

As always, let us know if you have questions about OneSearch (or other library-related things): Visit our Help page to find your favorite way of reaching us! We’re here to help.

And happy researching!

Mudd Library Welcome Week 2019

Your friends in the Mudd Library are so excited to welcome new students and their families and friends to Lawrence for welcome week! We’ve already been having fun meeting with student athletes and summer institute students, but have even more exciting stuff planned for welcome week.

Monday, September 9

Visit us at the Campus Resources Fair in the Somerset Room of the Warch Campus Center: 11:30 am – 1 pm

Parent Library Lounge, Relax in the Mudd: 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm Welcome, parents! Stop by the Mudd Library any time between 1 and 3 pm and take a load off. Make yourselves comfortable, wander around, grab a magazine or newspaper (in front of the circulation desk), relax in the Milwaukee-Downer Room, use the wireless, sip some coffee or tea. Enjoy our library!

Thursday, September 12

Happy Lawrentians from last year’s open house.

Welcome to the Mudd! Open House: 9:00 am – 12:00 pm: Stop by the Mudd and meet the people who can help you succeed. Not only can you find out about the library (both online and offline), take a tour, and enjoy some food–you can build with Legos, make origami bookmarks, play games, and more! It’s both fun and educational, and you can’t beat that.

Friday, September 13

Explore the Mudd! Sessions beginning at 1:30 pm, through 4:30 pm: All of us at the Mudd Library welcome you to Lawrence! We provide services, materials, and staff that will support your academic and personal interests and we want you to get off to a good start with these short programs designed to provide quick, basic introductions to what’s up in the Mudd.

  • What’s the Mudd? (30 minutes): The library here has some major differences from other libraries, public and school, that you’ve used before, so there’s lots of new stuff to learn. More importantly, however, we want you to feel at home here. This session will introduce you to the way the library is organized, the kinds of things we provide, and the ways the library connects with you and your work. Sessions will begin at 1:30, 2:30, 3:30
  • Scores and CDs and Streaming, oh my! (30 minutes) Finding music in the Mudd can be an adventure. Learn some tips and tricks to make your life easier as you navigate through the Library’s extensive collections of scores and recordings. Sessions will begin at 2:00, 3:00, 4:00
  • Tour the Mudd (30 minutes) Take a walking tour of the building with a friendly librarian and find out what’s where: collections, study spaces, places to get help, and more! Tours will begin at 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00

During Welcome Week, the library will be open from 8 am – 4:30 pm Monday – Friday, from 10 am – 4:30 pm on Saturday, and 11 am – 4:30 pm on Sunday. School year hours begin on Monday, September 16th.

Be sure to stop by anytime over welcome week (or during the school year) to ask a question or just say hi to your new friends in the Mudd Library. Remember, we’re here to help you succeed!

2019 Honors Projects

Nabor with his honors project title page and cookie.

In the 2019-2020 academic year, 19 students were awarded honors in independent study for their honors projects! If you’re wondering what this entails, here’s the description from the honors projects web page:
       “Honors Projects are coherent programs of independent work carried out by students, usually in their senior year, on subjects or problems of more than ordinary difficulty in areas that they have studied in considerable depth, usually in their majors or closely related areas. An Honors Project may also be a work of creative, visual or performing art.”

Many students elect to have their projects uploaded into Lux, the Lawrence University institutional repository. Projects from 2019, as well as most from the past ten years, and some going back to 1960, can be accessed in Lux.

Lawrence University Honors Projects in Lux

Uploading to Lux has provided us in the library an opportunity to not only allow students to share their work with the world, but also to celebrate their achievement and share what they’ve accomplished with their classmates. After uploading, each student prints out their title page, adds it to a large tack board, and gets a cookie. It’s a small celebration, but we took photos anyway. See students adding their pages in the Honors Projects 2019 flickr album.

APOLLO 11 – NASA’s First Moon Landing

Eagle with a branch landing on the moon with the Earth in the background and the words APOLLO 11 on top.
Apollo 11 mission patch
Credits: NASA

By Jill Thomas, Director of Technical Services

On July 16, 1969, a crew of three NASA astronauts, Neil Armstrong, Commander, Buzz Aldrin, Lunar Module Pilot, and Michael Collins, Columbia Command Module Pilot, set out to land on the moon. On July 19, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin took the first steps on the lunar surface, spending over 21 hours there before returning to Earth. Their success captivated Americans and the world. The landing completed a ten-year mission to send Americans to the moon.

50 years on, scientific exploration has continued over the intervening decades. Check out the links below which highlight both the Apollo 11 mission and the Apollo Program. Don’t forget to think about sharing your story with NASA!

Online Resources for the Apollo 11 Moon Landing:

Mudd & Friends Summer 2019 Coffeehouse Series!

Come one, come all, to the library’s summer coffeehouse series. If you’re unfamiliar with the coffeehouses, they provide an opportunity to come to the library, enjoy a snack, and learn a little something. This year, guests from a variety of departments will be joining our roster of library presenters and sharing information on topics of personal interest. More details are available on our coffeehouse guide.

Coffeehouses are held on the first floor of the library. We start promptly at 10:00 am and finish at 10:45 am. All members of the Lawrence community are welcome to attend.

July 10: “Summer Reading!”
The ever-popular Summer Reading coffeehouse returns! Started to plan your beach reading? Got your own summer reading underway? Come and hear about favorite reads from library staff and whoever else shows up. It could – and should – be you! The list of books to be discussed are available on the summer reading 2019 guide (more will be added after the event- so be sure to check back).

July 17: Bruce Hetzler: “Magic, Mentalism and the Mind”
“Magic, Mentalism, & the Mind” describes how Magicians and Mentalists use psychological principles to deceive their audiences. “Great information! They really enjoyed it.” — Catie Anderson, Curator of Education, Woodson Art Museum in Wausau, WI

July 24: Jason Brozek, Relena Ribbons: “Ultramarathoning for Fun and Profit”
You’ve seen the joys, the agonies, and the despair on Facebook. Now find out more about ultramarathoning: how it works, why do it, and the best ways to avoid it.

July 31: Allison Fleshman: “McFleshman’s, Lawrence, and Appleton”
McFleshman’s Brewing Co. is Lawrence’s new downtown neighbor and already has quite the relationship. Come hear about the science of beer and how Lawrence science students will help us experiment our way to a better pint. She’ll also share the numerous projects they have planned with Appleton. Cheers!

August 7: Kelvin Maestre: “Researching & Creating in the Makerspace: I Did it, So Can You!”
Kelvin spent the summer as the makerspace research assistant working with LU faculty to integrate makerspace tools and equipment (including the new laser cutter) into their coursework. Come learn about these projects as well as how your friends in the makerspace can help you!

August 14: Andrew McSorley and Jedidiah Rex: “Geeky Stuff R Us”
Andrew and Jedidiah will share tools to make teaching and learning more engaging, active, and maybe, just maybe, more fun. If attendees are interested in trying the tools they are encouraged to bring a laptop.

National Library Week 2019!

Celebrate National Library Week, April 7-13, with your friends in the Mudd Library!

Tuesday, April 9th: Say thanks to our amazing student workers on National Library Workers Day!

Wednesday, April 10: Ask a question at the reference desk between 6-9 pm, get a cookie! Planning on attending? Invite a friend with our Facebook event!

All Week: Tell us what you love about the Mudd Library, or all libraries! We’ll have a National Library Week Notes box set out for your library love notes.

Poster describing National Library Week events: Tuesday, April 9th: Say thanks to our amazing student workers on National Library Workers Day! Wednesday, April 10: Ask a question at the reference desk between 6-9 pm, get a cookie! All Week: Tell us what you love about the Mudd Library, or all libraries!

Alumni Librarians: Zachary Fannin ’12

Editor’s note: We invited Lawrence alumni who have gone into library work to share with us what they do and how they got there.  Here’s another in a series.

At the end of my junior year at Lawrence, while wrapping up a tutorial meeting with Professor Carr, she asked about my post-LU plans. I had myriad answers which, in reality meant I really had no answer at all. All my life, I had been able to answer the question “What do you want to do when you grow up?” without hesitation, but a variety of unexpected, ongoing, and often debilitating health problems screwed up my plans. I no longer had a clear vision. Professor Carr sensed my confusion, smiled and said, “You might want to look into library science.” The rest is history.

Epiphany! Libraries had always been my intellectual and emotional sanctuaries, but, strangely enough, I had never seriously looked into the profession. As long as I can remember, I have been fascinated by classification and organization, and not just of books: I’ve always been always curious about the philosophy and logic behind such notions, wanting to know how we describe things and classify them accordingly; the nature of the relationship between the concrete (e.g., a copy of a book) and the abstract (e.g., what a book is about); whether we organize things just for convenience, by convention, or in a manner allusive to deeper assumptions (consistent with the world carved at its joints). It only made sense to pursue a career where I could put these questions to the test and, yes, be surrounded by books, but in truth, that’s merely a bonus to my job; librarianship deals with far more than analog books nowadays. (Yes, dusty, bibliographic curmudgeons, I qualified the term book!)

Thus, I enrolled at UW-Madison’s iSchool (formerly SLIS–School of Library and Information Studies; now the Information School, a humorously vague title). Just as I matriculated, unexpected and unfortunate personal events reared their ugly heads once again, forcing me to take things at a much slower pace than originally planned. What I discovered was breathing room, allowing me to concentrate on doing a stellar job on fewer assignments and gain invaluable work experience, all of which led me to my current, dare I say it, perfect job.

A starter job as a pager in the Special Collections Department (which I loved because it allowed me to go into the vaults and inhale the archival fumes), gave me a chance to do some basic cataloging, and returned me to the meticulous world of bibliographic control. It reminded me of learning the basics of the card catalog back in grade school, when computers weren’t yet ubiquitous. Here it was: a way to utilize my love of organizing, to implement my abstract interests, and to facilitate information access and retrieval (with no appreciation from reference staff—Kidding!…kinda…).

Along the grad school way (actually, before I even started classes), I tripped over a job in the UW Law School Library. The Reference Librarian asked me to help with the library’s brand new institutional repository. Projects involved creating and maintaining collections of digital resources significant to the school’s history. I stuck with it all four years I was a student, and discovered an interest working at the intersection of analog and digital data—a fascination with the juxtaposition of old and new technology (e.g., I created electronic records for archived manuscripts and digitized old, brittle faculty photos). I worked on the faculty scholarship collection, the digital photo collection, and, my favorite, the oral histories. The Law School Library served as a guinea pig testing the new Oral History Metadata Synchronizer (OHMS), an open-source software program facilitating metadata creation for interview recordings (involving former and current faculty/staff members). I indexed, summarized, and subject cataloged entire interviews (ranging in length from 2 to 8+ hours), listening two or three times over to be sure I captured all that might be of interest to patrons. The histories were fascinating, and I enjoyed creating data that (I hoped) would help patrons find what they needed for their research. I plan to do likewise here in DC, working on improving the hitherto neglected metadata for the LOC’s Web Archive.

Speaking of the LOC, shortly before I fully entered the dreaded world of job applications, I came across an interesting opening on the iSchool’s jobs blog: a new residential program at the Library of Congress. Knowing the chances were slim at best, I took a shot in the dark and applied. Thereafter I thought little of it, staying realistic and increasingly preoccupying myself with job applications elsewhere. I had several initial interviews but no job materialized. Then, in February, I received a phone call from the Library of Congress. A section head, the librarian who created the new residency program, asked me if she could interview me. A month and a half after the interview, I was offered and accepted a place in the program.

Six months into the residency, my section decided to hang onto me permanently. I can now call myself a full-fledged librarian. I plan to move up the ranks in my division to a point where I can catalog independently and train other employees. Down the road, my supervisor will lend me to another section to help subject catalog their influx of philosophy materials (I majored in philosophy at LU and continue to study it on my own time). I also plan to get involved in the BIBFRAME Initiative, a program testing the new Bibliographic Framework data scheme to replace MARC (finally!–don’t tell a veteran cataloger I said that). The scheme will streamline cataloging across different library systems and allow users to access the institutional catalogs outside their ivory towers (e.g., when you look up a title via Google, search results finally will include library holdings). As digital libraries continue to grow, metadata remains crucial to navigating bibliographical cyberspace. I’d like to help patrons maneuver through the maze of online resources with clear, concise, and consistent metadata.

I am unbelievably fortunate to have begun my career in the largest, most respected cultural heritage institution in the world.

Thanks, again, Karen. (And thanks, Pete, for letting me pick your brain about the profession.)

By Zachary Fannin, Class of 2012

Academic Citation Workshop

Want to learn answers to important questions like,

  • why do we cite?
  • what’s the difference between MLA and APA?
  • when do I use footnotes?
  • what should be cited (and what shouldn’t be)?

If so, come to the Academic Citation Workshop, co-hosted by your friends from the Mudd Library and the Center for Academic Success. Gretchen Revie, Julie Haurykiewicz, and Nicole Crashell will guide you through the art and science of academic citations.

The workshop will take place on the first floor of the Mudd Library at 4:30 on Tuesday, April 23rd. Hope to see you there!

The Web Turns 30

By Jill Thomas, Director of Technical Services

Do you know the name Tim Berners-Lee? Well, the idea that he came up with 30 years ago on March 12 touches us almost every minute of every day – he invented the internet!

Thirty years ago, Tim Berners-Lee was working at CERN (European Council for Nuclear Research/Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire) and thought it would be great if he could link and access information across computers. By November 1990, his idea had become, “[a] web of information nodes in which the user can browse at will” as he stated in his formal proposal written with his CERN colleague, Robert Cailliau, titled World Wide Web: Proposal for a Hyper Text Project. By Christmas of 1990, Berners-Lee and Cailliau had implemented key components such as html, http, and URL, and created the first Web server, browser, and editor.

On April 30, 1990, CERN released the first version of the WWW software into the public domain and made it freely available to anyone to use and improve. Today, half of the world’s population is online and there are close to 2 billion websites. Openness has always been a part of CERN’s culture. Today CERN continues to promote open sharing of software, technology, publications and data through initiatives such as open source software, open hardware, open access publishing, and CERN’s Open Data Portal.

Today take a moment to thank Sir Tim Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau for their imagination and their drive to communicate just a little easier with their colleagues.