APPLETON, WIS. — Dale Duesing, hailed as “a singer who changed opera in the 20th century” by the French magazine Monde de la Musique, returns Saturday, Feb. 7 to familiar surroundings — the Lawrence Memorial Chapel. The 1967 Lawrence University graduate performs in concert at 8 p.m. as part of the 100th anniversary of the Lawrence Artist Series.

Tickets, at $22-20 for adults, $19-17 for seniors and $15-17 for students, are available through the Lawrence Box Office, 420 E. College Ave., Appleton, or by phone at 920-832-6749.

Duesing’s international vocal career has spanned four decades and continues to grow in scope and expertise. The highly acclaimed baritone has sung in the world’s foremost opera houses and has appeared as a soloist with many of the world’s leading orchestras, including the New York and Berlin Philharmonic Orchestras, the Chicago Symphony and the Saint Cecilia of Rome.

Patrice Michaels, professor of music at Lawrence and an acclaimed opera singer in her own right, calls Duesing “the quintessential professional singer.”

“Dale is the kind of opera singer of whom stage and music directors say, ‘if Dale’s available, then we can do virtually anything.’ His versatility, reliability, and audience appeal have made him a household name in the best opera houses and with the best orchestras in the world.”

Duesing’s award-winning career, which has included new challenges as well as familiar roles, has earned him “Singer of the Year” honors from Germany’s Opernwelt magazine and a 1993 Grammy for his recording of Samuel Barber’s “The Lovers” with the Chicago Symphony. He made his operatic directorial debut in 2004, earning best production and best director nominations from Opernwelt.

Duesing, a native of Milwaukee, makes his home in Appleton and serves as an artist-in-residence at Lawrence’s conservatory of music.

“He is ‘Uncle Dale’ to generations of voice students whom he mentors frequently,” said Michaels. “Fox Valley audiences know that Dale’s singing is informed by his technical skill and theatrical expertise, but moreover by his deep sense of compassion and love of humanity.”