Author: Rick Peterson

Wild Space Dance Company wants you to get “Caught up in the Moment”

Sound, music and movement intersect to create a moving work of art in Milwaukee-based Wild Space Dance Company’s performance of “Caught Up in the Moment” Friday, March 31 at Lawrence University’s Stansbury Theatre.

Tickets for the 8 p.m. show, at $15 for adults, $10 for seniors, $8 for students, are available online or through the Lawrence Box Office, 920-832-6749.Four members of the Wild Space Dance Company performing a dance from the program Caught Up in the Moment.

The performance unfolds in interconnecting vignettes of shifting solos, duets, trios and quartets as audience members share the stage with the eight dancers as they invent impromptu movement set to eclectic, improvised live music by percussionist/composer Tim Russell and saxophonist/composer Nick Zoulek.

Choreographed by Artistic Director Debra Loewen and intern Nicole Spence, dancers sing, hum and create sounds with costumes and props to create textured layers of sound and music while Russell and Zoulek respond to interlocking dances.

“Each element — sound, music and movement — inspire and respond to each other during the creative process,” said Loewen. “This performance captures those moments of invention and connection as they happen. Having the audience on the stage puts them in the center of this artistic interplay and offers opportunities for dancers to create something unique to their interaction with the audience.”

Wild Space has been as an artist-in-residence at Lawrence since 2000, teaching dance classes, theatre movement workshops and choreographing for selected productions.

Founded by Loewen, Wild Space Dance Company is celebrating its 30th season of inventive performances and innovative outreach programs. Known for site-specific works and artistic collaborations, Wild Space takes audiences on adventures through built and natural landscapes, visual art, history and the human condition through wry humor, clever choreography and emotionally-charged dance.

It has toured performance work to Chicago, Minneapolis, New York, South Korea and Japan.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Mnozil Brass brings its whimsical virtuosity to the Lawrence Memorial Chapel

The seven-member ensemble Mnozil Brass brings its unique blend of music virtuosity and theatrical wit to the Lawrence Memorial Chapel Wednesday, March 29 in a Lawrence University Artist Series performance.

A group photo of members of Mnozil Brass sitting on stools
The seven-member Mnozil Brass combines musical brilliance with touches of humor. Photo by Carsten Bunnemann.

Tickets, at $25-30 for adults, $20-25 for seniors, $18-20 for students, are available online through the Lawrence Box Office or by calling 920-832-6749.

Since their first performances in 1992 at open mic events in a Vienna, Austria, tavern, the seven graduates of the renowned Vienna College of Music have established themselves as one of the world’s premiere brass ensembles…with a twist.

Presented with a generous dollop of Austrian-style humor, their repertoire spans the musical spectrum from Bach to Zappa, from the classics to new movie music. A concert program may include everything from Austrian drinking and folk songs to jazz and pop, new arrangements of classical works and some 20th-century German schlager pieces thrown in for good measure. Coupled with choreographed theater, dance moves and some slapstick antics have led to descriptions as “the Monty Python of the musical world.”

In his review of a 2016 performance, Jonathan Blumhofer wrote “Whether they’re lampooning scenes from ‘2001: A Space Odyssey,’ leading the house in the Macarena or providing a lengthy commentary on the night’s proceedi

Thomas Gansch is one of the founding members of Mnozil Brass.

ngs in Spanish, the Mnozil’s are about as zany as they come. But they’re also among the most stellar brass players you might hope to encounter.”

Marty Erickson, who teaches tuba at Lawrence, calls their visit to Appleton “a must-see event.”

“Not only is this group considered the finest brass ensemble of its kind in the world, they do it all seemingly effortlessly with great fun,” said Erickson. “Imagine hearing something by Debussy followed by Queen’s ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ or an opera excerpt followed by Stevie Wonder’s ‘Superstition.’ They are truly a hoot.”

Featuring three trumpet players —Thomas Gansch, Robert Rother and Roman Rindberger — three trombonists —Gerhard Füssl, Zoltan Kiss and Leonhard Paul — and one tuba player —Wilfried Branstoetter — Mnozil Brass has recorded eight albums and six DVDs. They’ve collaborated on three operetta and opera productions and composed and recorded the music for the 2006 film “Freundschaft.”

The ensemble has been nominated for the Amadeus Austrian Music Award and was the recipient of the prestigious Salzburger Stier Cabaret Prize in 2006.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Bridging Cultural Gaps: Senior Sam Genualdi will travel the globe in search of musical collaborations as Watson Fellow

Music has always been a part of Sam Genualdi’s DNA.

Sam Genualdi ’17

He grew up as a serial instrumentalist, working his way through a litany of recommendations from his parents — violin, piano, percussion, double bass — but it wasn’t until he taught himself to play the guitar at the age of 15 that he found his sweet spot.

“When I picked up the guitar, it felt like something on my terms,” said Genualdi, a senior at Lawrence University from Evanston, Ill. “I felt like I was rebelling against my parents through the electric guitar.”

As his musical interests evolved, he discovered collaborating with other musicians was vital to his creative process. Later this year, Genualdi will embark on a year-long musical “binge” to feed his creative hunger that will take him around the world to engage in collaborations with musicians he’s never met.

Genualdi, a student-designed contemporary improvisation major at Lawrence, has been named one of 40 national recipients of a $30,000 Watson Fellowship for a wanderjahr of independent travel and exploration. Beginning in August, Genualdi will spend 12 months visiting Scotland, Peru, Indonesia, India and Japan.

“I plan to spend my Watson year in five countries steeped in unfamiliar musical traditions,” said Genualdi, Lawrence’s 72nd Watson Fellow since the program’s inception in 1969. “Music can be a powerful tool to bridge cultural gaps. I hope to co-create music that makes this evident. I want to engage in musical collaborations that push against the boundaries of existing genres.

“I have always thrived on collaboration,” added Genualdi, who has had plenty of opportunities as a member of numerous groups and ensembles at Lawrence, including the small jazz combos, the improvisation group IGLU, Gamelan Cahaya Asri and the Sambistas Brazilian drumming group, among others. “While I’ve done a fair amount of solitary work as a musician, the experiences that most excite me are those that involve interacting with other people.”

At each of his global destinations, Genualdi plans to meet musicians he hopes to work with by attending concerts and jam sessions. He will approach local musicians as a student to develop relationships and more effectively absorb the culture.

Sam is infinitely curious about sonic possibilities and how improvisation and collaboration can create
musical worlds yet unimagined.”

— Brian Pertl, dean of the conservatory of music

“Taking lessons will give me the opportunity to interact with these musicians on a personal level, accumulate skills and expand my musical vocabulary,” said Genuldi. “I may learn a new instrument to gain perspective, but mainly I intend to communicate musically through my primary voice, the guitar.”

In Scotland, Genualdi will focus on the country’s rich history of stringed instruments, including guitar. In Peru, he will work with within Afro-Peruvian music traditions which combine African, European and native influences.

“Afro-Peruvian music along with the salsa and flamenco traditions prevalent in Lima involve unique forms of improvisation,” said Genualdi. “My background in jazz will help me find common repertoire to play with locals because of the relatively recent surge in the fusion of jazz and local traditions.”

January will find Genualdi in Bali where he looks to expand his experience with Indonesian music, which has been limited to his work with Gamelan Cahaya Asr. The following three months will take him to India, where traditions of improvisation in Hindustani music run deep. Much of his time there will focus on working with several highly regarded sitarists.

The final three months of his travels will be spent in Tokyo’s vibrant musical community with its improvised and experimental music scene. Genualdi calls the enthusiasm in Japan for fringe musical projects “inspiring.”

When it comes to instruments, the guitar serves as Sam Genualdi’s “voice” of choice.

Brian Pertl, dean of the conservatory of music and Lawrence’s campus liaison to the Watson Foundation, calls Genualdi “an explorer of sound.”

“Sam is infinitely curious about sonic possibilities and how improvisation and collaboration can create musical worlds yet unimagined,” said Pertl, himself a Watson Fellow in 1986 as a Lawrence senior. “He has been pushing the boundaries of improvisation during his time at Lawrence and now will have an opportunity to explore his passion across the globe. I can’t wait to see what new musical concoctions will emerge from his grand adventure.”

Genualdi says the Watson experience will deepen his relationship to music and profoundly affect every aspect of his life moving forward.

“The musical experiences I’ll have in each country is sure to be different, but each will help   bring into focus a larger picture of the human experience. Music is an important part of lives across the globe and I am intensely inspired by discovering these connections.”

Genualdi was selected for the Watson Fellowship from among 149 finalists nominated by 40 leading liberal arts colleges. This year’s 49th class of Watson Fellows hail from 21 states and six countries and will collectively visit 67 countries.

More than 2,700 students have been awarded Watson Fellowships, providing opportunities to test their aspirations, abilities and perseverance through a personal project that is cultivated on an international scale. Watson Fellows have gone on to become international leaders in their fields including CEOs of major corporations, college presidents, MacArthur grant recipients, Pulitzer Prize winners, diplomats, artists, lawyers, doctors, faculty, journalists, and many renowned researchers and innovators.

The fellowship was established by the children of Thomas J. Watson, Sr., the founder of International Business Machines Corp., and his wife, Jeannette, to honor their parents’ long-standing interest in education and world affairs.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Voice teacher Ken Bozeman releases second book on vocal pedagogy

In a follow-up to his 2013 book “Practical Vocal Acoustics,” Lawrence University Voice Professor Kenneth Bozeman has written a second book designed to help voice instructors better teach their craft.

Featuring more studio applications of the principles he outlined in his first book, Bozeman’s just-published “Kinesthetic Voice Pedagogy: Motivating Acoustic Efficiency” explores the science behind harmonics, vowel perception and formant tuning while providing insights on how best to teach those concepts by using kinestetic, visual and physiological approaches.

Topics examined in the book include remapping the open throat, sensation migration across range and comparisons of treble and non-treble voice training.

In July (16-21), Bozeman will co-lead a seminar on topics covered in both books  with Ian Howell of the New England Conservatory at Bjorklunden, Lawrence’s northern campus in Door County.

The seminar is designed for voice teachers of high school, college or adult students; college voice majors and voice students who are graduate performance or vocal pedagogy majors; choral conductors who incorporate vocal training in their rehearsals and voice therapists specializing in the rehabilitation of singers.

Kenneth Bozeman

The Frank C. Shattuck Professor of Music at Lawrence, Bozeman is the chair of the voice department, where he teaches voice and voice science and pedagogy. He is a frequent presenter on voice acoustics at national conferences and association meetings and currently serves as chair of the editorial board of the Journal of Singing, the national publication of the National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS).

Bozeman joined the Lawrence conservatory faculty in 1977. A tenor, he has performed with the Milwaukee Symphony, the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra and the Louisville Bach Society, among others.

He earned performance degrees from Baylor University and the University of Arizona. He also studied at the State Conservatory of Music in Munich, Germany on a fellowship from Rotary International.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

International Women’s Day: Lawrence Teach-in offers interdisciplinary focus on “topics of critical interest to women”

On the heels of last month’s Teach-in for Democracy, Lawrence University will host a Teach-in for International Women’s Day Wednesday, March 8.

The teach-in encourages faculty, staff and students to participate by attending regular course sessions focused on women’s issues and a day-long series of short discussions on a variety of topics presented by panels of diverse community members.

All of the classes and panel presentations are free and open to the public.

“The purpose of the teach-ins is to mobilize Lawrence resources to build better relationships within and beyond our campus to better understand and act on the pressing matters of our time,” said Matty Wegehaupt, instructor of Freshman Studies, gender studies and East Asian studies. Wegehaupt helped organize the teach-in with Sonja Downing, assistant professor of ethnomusicology, and Helen Boyd Kramer, lecturer in gender studies and Freshman Studies.

Among the academic departments offering open courses for the teach-in include Chinese history, education, English, French, gender studies and government. Topics of the classes for the day include Nobel Prize winner Malala Yousafzai, French revolutionary Louise Michel, violence against women; Muslim feminism, and one of the founding texts of the feminist movement, Mary Wollstonecraft’s “A Vindication of the Rights of Women.”

The day-long series of panels will feature presentations from both Lawrence students, faculty and staff as well as community leaders. Members of the Fox Valley Literacy Council will discuss immigrant and refugee women. Jenny Van Schyndel, representing the United Steelworks of America, presents “Women and Labor Unions in the U.S.” Irene Strohbeen from the League of Women Voters will lead a session on civic education.

Lawrence presenters will include faculty from the conservatory of music, gender studies and history departments with presentations on Chinese, Korean and African feminist resistance.

Kimberly Barrett, vice president of inclusion and diversity affairs at Lawrence, will discuss black feminist thought while Jenna Stone, executive director of budget and planning, will present on women and leadership in the social sector.

Wegehaupt said globalizing perspectives on women’s lives, struggles and successes was one of the primary goals for the Teach-in for International Women’s Day

“We want to inform ourselves, debate and organize around topics of critical interest to women,” said Wegehaupt. “We want to energize all members of the Lawrence community to take responsibility for educating ourselves about the world and shaping our collective futures.”

A complete schedule of the teach-in classes and presentations can be found here.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

 

Lawrence honoring international refugee expert at 2017 commencement

An expert on international refugee policy who miraculously survived a suicide bomber attack in Baghdad, Iraq, will be recognized by Lawrence University with an honorary degree June 11 at its 168th commencement.

International refugee expert Gil Loescher will receive an honorary degree at Lawrence’s 2017 commencement in June.

Gil Loescher, a visiting professor at the Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford, will be awarded an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree. He also will serve as the principal commencement speaker.

In a career spanning more than 40 years, Loescher has established himself as an authority on refugee policy. Prior to joining Oxford’s Refugee Studies Centre in 2008, Loescher held appointments as Senior Fellow for Forced Migration and International Security at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London and as senior researcher at the European Council on Refugees and Exiles.

“I am thrilled that Gil Loescher will join us as at our 168th commencement,” said Lawrence President Mark Burstein. “The challenges that face the world have never been more pronounced. Lawrentians’ interest in understanding these challenges and gaining knowledge and experience to solve them has never been greater. Dr. Loescher provides a unique insight that is both timely and practical.”

Loescher has worked closely for many years in a variety of capacities with the United Nations, especially the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. In August, 2003, Loescher was at the Canal Hotel in Baghdad and in the office of Sérgio Vieira de Mello, then the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, when a suicide bomber denoted a truck bomb outside the building, killing more than 20 people and injuring more than 100.

Loescher was among nine people in the office at the time of the explosion, seven of whom were killed instantly. Loescher and Vieria de Mello were trapped in the debris of the collapsed building. American soldiers spent more than three hours trying to rescue them. Vieria de Mello died before he could be extricated. Loescher survived, although his legs were crushed and they had to be amputated by the soldiers.

He launched his career at the University of Notre Dame, where he spent 26 years teaching in the political science department. During his tenure, he held appointments in the university’s Helen Kellogg Institute of International Studies, the Joan Kroc Institute of International Peace Studies and the Center for Civil and Human Rights.

He also has served as a visiting fellow at Princeton University, London School of Economics and the Department of Humanitarian Affairs at the U.S. State Department.

He has been recognized with numerous honors and research grants from organizations ranging from the Ford Foundation and the MacArthur Foundation to the Fulbright Program and the British Academy.

He earned a bachelor’s degree in history from St. Mary’s College of California, a master’s degree in politics and Asian studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies and a Ph.D. in international relations at the London School of Economics.

This will be Loesher’s second honorary degree. Notre Dame awarded him an honorary doctorate of law in 2006.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Lawrence social media director wins national recognition

Lawrence University social media director Kasey Corrado has been named one of four national SimpsonScarborough Scholars by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE).

Kasey Corrado

The program supports the professional development of promising communications and marketing practitioners in the educational advancement profession. CASE administers the scholarships, which are sponsored by SimpsonScarborough, an Alexandria, Va.-based communications and marketing consulting firm that specializes in higher education.

Corrado joined the Lawrence communications office in 2014 as the university’s first social media coordinator. She was promoted to social media director in 2016. She manages Lawrence’s primary Facebook and Twitter accounts as well as the university’s LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube, Snapchat, Pinterest and Tumblr channels.

Craig Gagnon, associate vice president of communications at Lawrence, cited Corrado for her initiative and success in developing and implementing a strategic social media program in nominating her for the award.

“Kasey is already a valuable part of the Lawrence staff,” said Gagnon, “and has the potential to become an industry leader as well as a campus leader.”

The SimpsonScarborough Scholars program is designed to nurture and sustain the professional development of the scholars, establish a network of scholars over time who become mentors to other promising newcomers, and support the communications and marketing disciplines overall.

As a scholar, Corrado will be eligible for several benefits, including attendance at the 2017 Summer Institute for Communications and Marketing, CASE’s flagship training program for newcomers to the communications/marketing field.

Joining Corrado as this year’s SimpsonScarborough Scholars are Daniel Baney, communications specialist, Northwest College in Powell, Wyo., Myrna Flynn, communications manager, Smith College in Northampton, Mass., and Paul Kingsmith, communications specialist, Lethbridge College in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Economic effects of U.S. immigration policies explored in Povolny Lecture Series presentation

Sarah Bohn, a 1999 Lawrence University graduate, returns to her alma mater to discuss the economic results proposed U.S. policies may have on unauthorized immigrants, especially those from Mexico, as part of the 2017 Povolny Lecture Series in International Studies “Trade and Migration: Globalization at Issue.”

Sarah Bohn ’99

Currently a current research fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California, a nonprofit, nonpartisan think tank fellow, Bohn presents “Economic Consequences of U.S. Policy Toward Unauthorized Immigration” Tuesday, March 7 at 7:30 p.m. in the Wriston Art Center auditorium. The event is free and open to the public.

The issue of unauthorized immigration has intensified as a political topic since the 2016 presidential election. U.S. policymakers are poised to make major changes that could have far-reaching effects in shaping the country and the economy.

A labor economist, Bohn specializes in public policy that affects individual and family economic well-being, with a focus on low-income and vulnerable populations. She has written on issues ranging from the labor market impact of immigration policy to the workforce skills gap. Her current research focuses on social safety net policy and job training through public career technical education.

After earning a bachelor’s degree magna cum laude in economics and mathematics at Lawrence, Bohn earned a master’s degree and Ph.D. in economics at the University of Maryland.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Cultural competency series examines global citizenship

 The third presentation in a five-part Lawrence University series examining issues related to cultural competency looks at global citizenship Friday, March 3. The one-hour program “Intercultural Skills for Successful Global Citizenship” begins at 11:30 a.m. in the Warch Campus Center. It is free and open to the public.

Leah McSorley
Cecile Despres-Berry

The program will be led by Cecile Despres-Berry, lecturer in English as a second language and director of Lawrence’s program with students from Tokyo’s Waseda University, Leah McSorley, director of international student services at Lawrence and Laura Zuege, director of Lawrence’s off-campus programs. Collectively they will explore the idea of global/intercultural competence, offer practical tools for intercultural communication and provide resources for internationalizing one’s perspective.

Lawrence is home to more than 200 students with global backgrounds, nearly 200 students who have studied abroad as well as faculty and staff with a wide range of international professional and personal experiences.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

 

Traditional old-time music featured in Lawrence World Music Series

Baltimore-based father-son duo Ken and Brad Kolodner bring their virtuosity on the clawhammer banjo, fiddle and hammered dulcimer to Lawrence University Monday, Feb. 27 as part of the university’s World Music Series. The Kolodners will be joined by fiddler extraordinaire Rachel Eddy.

Brad and Ken Kolodnar ’76

Tickets for the performance at 8 p.m. in Harper Hall of the Music-Drama Center, at $10 for adults, $5 for seniors and students, are available through the Lawrence Box Office, 920-832-6749/

A 1976 Lawrence graduate, Ken Kolodner never played an instrument before taking up the fiddle at the age of 23. After Lawrence, he earned a Ph.D. at Johns Hopkins University and began a career in public health as an epidemiologist. He evolved from full-time scientist to full-time musician, establishing himself as one of the country’s most influential old-time fiddlers and hammered dulcimer players. He began touring in 2009 with his son, Brad, a radio personality in Washington, D.C., where he hosts a progressive bluegrass, old-time and Americana show. Brad Kolodner is a rising star in the clawhammer banjo world.

Together they play new arrangements of original and traditional old-time music on instruments that include the gourd banjo, banjola, triple fiddles, hammered mbira, hammered dulcimer and others.

A West Virginia native, Eddy performs and teaches banjo, guitar, mandolin and bass. She recently spent five years in Sweden, where she taught Appalachian music and dance. She has released four albums, including 2014’s “Nothin’ But Corn.”

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.