Category: Students

$2.5M gift endows new professorship to teach psychology of collaboration

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

A $2.5 million gift will allow Lawrence University to create an endowed professorship to teach the psychology of collaboration, adding to the school’s efforts to better prepare Lawrentians for life after Lawrence.  

The donation from J. Thomas Hurvis ’60 to create the J. Thomas Hurvis Professorship of Social and Organizational Psychology was announced at the May meeting of the Board of Trustees.

It is the latest in a long line of generous gifts to Lawrence from Hurvis, founder and chairman of Old World Industries and longtime philanthropist.

The new position, which will be based in the Psychology Department but will contribute regularly to the Innovation and Entrepreneurship program, will provide teaching that is focused on cross-cultural collaboration, group life, ethical thought and moral judgment. It’s the type of study usually found in business schools or as part of doctoral programs. At Lawrence, it will build on existing Lawrence strengths to allow students across disciplines to access teachings that will better prepare them to be the leaders of tomorrow, no matter their career direction.

The position is expected to be filled in time for the 2020-21 academic year.

“I am deeply grateful to Tom Hurvis for his vision and generosity in endowing the J. Thomas Hurvis Professorship in Social and Organizational Psychology,” President Mark Burstein said. “Tom’s passion for collaboration is the hallmark of his success both as a businessman and a philanthropist.  This new appointment will allow us to offer courses that will provide students access to research on group life, leadership, and social psychology, areas of increasing student interest, while also enriching and expanding interdisciplinary points of contact with our Innovation and Entrepreneurship program.”

The new professorship is an extension of efforts already under way to enhance offerings and programming to better prepare students for life after Lawrence. A year ago, Hurvis made a $2.5 million gift to create an endowed deanship, which was part of the public launch of Lawrence’s $220 million Be the Light! Campaign. Named for Hurvis’s founding partner in Old World Industries, the Riaz Waraich Dean for Career, Life, and Community Engagement position is now filled by Mike O’Connor, who is overseeing efforts in the Center for Career, Life, and Community Engagement (CLC) to bolster connections and skills to make Lawrentians both job market-ready when they graduate and prepared to lead fruitful and fulfilling lives going forward.

This new professorship in Psychology and Innovation and Entrepreneurship will build on that investment to enhance skills needed in the modern world across all disciplines. 

“Through this new appointment, Lawrence will join the select handful of liberal arts colleges that provide the interdisciplinary skills fostered by a liberal arts education through programming that gives students the opportunity to develop creative, integrative approaches to real world issues,” Provost and Dean of the Faculty Catherine Kodat said. “The curricular possibilities inherent in the Hurvis Professorship — in exploring the dynamics of effective leadership and collaboration, in partnering with co-curricular programming and off-campus internships to put classroom concepts into action — are exciting to contemplate.”

J. Thomas Hurvis '60 speaks during November's public launch of the Be the Light campaign.
J. Thomas Hurvis ’60, speaking here during the public launch of the Be the Light! campaign, says having the skills to work collaboratively is a huge key to future success.

For Hurvis, working collaboratively hits close to home, and he believes strongly that the skills tied to collaboration are critical for success in almost any field.

“Partnership has been at the core of all of my life’s success,” he said. “Collaboration requires skills and a personal inclination. I am thrilled we can now ensure every Lawrence student has the opportunity to develop these skills and better understand the importance of this work. Collaboration is easy to describe but very, very hard to do.”

The latest Hurvis grant builds on the Be the Light! campaign, which has the student journey as one of its cornerstones, a focus on educating the whole student, from classroom learning in programs of distinction to personal development through wellness, career advising and the fostering of cross-cultural skills.

To date, the Be the Light! campaign has raised $182.8 million — 83% of the goal — since the quiet phase launch in 2014. Endowed positions, in addition to the Hurvis-funded deanship and new professorship, have included the Dwight and Marjorie Peterson Professorship in Innovation, the Dennis and Charlot Nelson Singleton Professorship in Cognitive Neuroscience, the Wendy and KK Tse Professorship in East Asian Studies, and the Jean Lampert Woy and J. Richard Woy Professorship in History.

“The generosity of the Lawrence community is extraordinary,” said Charlot Singleton ’67, one of the tri-chairs of the Be the Light! campaign. “Members of our community have invested in initiatives that will enhance the education the college offers for generations. We have made excellent progress toward our goals.”

The campaign progress thus far during 2019 has been strong, with $25.3 million in new campaign commitments outpacing the $22.5 million at this time last year.

Fundraising efforts continue for a number of special projects within the Be the Light! campaign — Full Speed to Full Need has reached $81.6 million (toward a goal of $85 million); the Center for Career, Life, and Community Engagement is at $1.7 million (toward a goal of $2.5 million that was in response to Hurvis’ challenge when he established the endowed Riaz Waraich Deanship last year); and the Center for Academic Success has reached $735,550 (toward a goal of $1 million).

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu


8 Summer events in Appleton we’re excited about

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

Whether you’re an art connoisseur or a car fanatic, there are always events going on in the Appleton area for you to enjoy. Here are 8 events you don’t want to miss this summer.

Downtown Appleton Farmers Market

This Appleton tradition is a great way to get your groceries. The impressive assemblage of local vendors sells fresh fruits and veggies, meats and cheeses, baked goods, pottery and crafts. Some stands will serve you up a cool lemonade or a hot portable meal that you can savor as you walk the market.

Where and when: College Avenue, Saturdays through October, 8 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Appleton 4th of July Celebration

Bring family or friends to Memorial Park to celebrate the 4th of July. Enjoy live music, concessions and activities for the kids. And, of course, stay for the amazing fireworks display when the sun goes down.

Where and when: Appleton Memorial Park, Wednesday, July 3. 4 p.m. – 11 p.m.

Paperfest

Paperfest is a community-driven festival commemorating the paper mill industry that thrived in the Fox Valley. This year is the 31st annual Paperfest, held just 10 minutes from downtown Appleton in Kimberly. The free festival boasts live music, food, games, carnival rides and a car show. And what would Paperfest be without a papermaking event and a toilet paper toss?

Where and when: Sunset Park, Kimberly, July 19 – 21

Appleton Old Car Show and Swap Meet

Did you know we have one of the largest car shows in the Midwest right here in Appleton? The whole family will be all revved up about this collection of special and vintage cars, featuring a swap meet, awards and concessions. Admission is free.

Where and when: Pierce Park, July 21. 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Heid Music Summer Concert Series

The Heid Music Summer Concert Series is back this year with two different concert experiences in Houdini Plaza. Bring your own lunch or purchase from vendors at Lunchtime Live, where you can enjoy acoustic music by local musicians from 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. The shows continue later that day with locally popular bands from 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m., after which you can visit Appleton’s nightlife locations.

Where and when: Houdini Plaza, every Thursday through Aug. 29.

Wriston Summer Exhibition Series

The Wriston Summer Exhibition Series offers you the opportunity to tour the Wriston Galleries on the Lawrence campus. During the 25-minute tour, July Art at Noon and August Art at Noon invite you to think more about art and artists in the Midwest.

Where and when: Wriston Art Gallery, Thursday, July 18 and Aug. 15. Noon – 12:30 p.m.

Art at the Park

Each year, approximately 200 artists from around the country gather in Appleton’s City Park to showcase and sell their art. With food and music included, this free family event will be the relaxing day at the park your summer needs.

Where and when: City Park, Sunday, July 28. Noon – 11:59 p.m.

Mile of Music

The Mile of Music has been bringing grassroots musical talent to Appleton since 2013. This is one of the most unique events the city has to offer. With over 900 live performances at over 70 venues, the “Mile” stretches from Spat’s Tav on the Ave to the Lawrence Memorial Chapel. This free event encourages a love for music and support of downtown Appleton businesses. What’s not to love?

Where and when: Downtown Appleton, Aug. 1 – 4.

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Lawrence celebrates Class of 2019: “Don’t let fear of failure kill your joy”

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

Well done, Lawrence University Class of 2019.

More than 330 graduates received their diplomas Sunday morning in a Commencement ceremony on the Main Hall green.

Faculty Marshal Kathy Privatt led the march across College Avenue for an outdoor ceremony replete with pomp, circumstance and tradition, along with a colorful assortment of umbrellas and rain gear. A light but steady rain did nothing to dampen the enthusiasm of what David Blowers ’82, chair of the Board of Trustees, called the “high point of the academic year.”

President Mark Burstein praised the senior class for a myriad of contributions to Lawrence, for setting a tone of compassion and empathy on campus and always exhibiting a desire to learn and grow.

“In a time when community is such a scarce commodity and people of different backgrounds and views are likely to argue, compete, or ignore each other, you came together to learn, to celebrate, and to struggle, as one community, with the issues that face Lawrence, this country, and the world,” he said.

See a livestream replay of the Lawrence Commencement ceremony and other 2019 Commencement Weekend events here.

Jordyn Pleiseis delivers her senior class speech during Commencement.
Jordyn Pleiseis delivers her senior class speech during Commencement.

Burstein said the heart and drive of the Class of 2019 is wonderfully represented in Jordyn Pleiseis, who the graduates chose to be their senior class speaker.

“Jordyn has left her mark on Lawrence in ways both physical, like the mural that adorns the Wellness Center that she helped install as an ally of native students, and ineffable, like the connections and supportive environment she fosters,” Burstein said. “Jordyn also speaks of the wonderful dynamic among Lawrence students both inside and outside of the classroom. You are friends, sharing fun and support, and you are also colleagues, learning from one another’s insight and experiences.”

Commencement speaker Lee Shallat Chemel ’65, a longtime theater and television director who worked behind the scenes on some of the most beloved TV shows of the past 35 years, implored the graduates to embrace their liberal arts education, to be OK with uncertainty and to never let the fear of failure zap their creative energies. Her Lawrence education, she told them, has been a guiding light for more than four decades of beautiful chaos.

“You chose a liberal arts education; you chose to keep your horizon wide, to explore a broad range of cultural and intellectual content,” she said. “You can adapt, improvise, synthesize. You can handle a world that is a bit chaotic.”

Pleiseis, an anthropology major, told her classmates they are deserving of today’s accolades, a four-year journey full of hard work and perseverance finally coming to fruition.

“We made our mark on this place, just as much as this place made its mark on us,” she said.

Watch a replay of Jordyn Pleiseis’ Commencement speech here.

Chemel’s story

Lee Shallat Chemel, on stage, addresses the Lawrence graduates during her Commencement speech.
Lee Shallat Chemel addresses the Lawrence graduates during her Commencement speech.

Chemel, whose directing credits include stints with Murphy Brown, Northern Exposure, Arrested Development, Gilmore Girls, Hannah Montana, and The Middle, among many others, told the graduates she made bold leaps of faith along her journey, jumping from teaching to acting to theater directing to TV sitcoms and dramas. There was never a promise of success at any step in the process, only the prospect of a worthy challenge and the knowledge that she had a strong liberal arts education to lean on.

She never stopped learning.

Chemel said some of her most profound life lessons came from her darkest days. She said firings and failures at one point had her so focused on not screwing up that she could no longer find joy in her work. Her creativity quickly waned.

She told the story of working on an episode of Gilmore Girls that was going so badly that production came to a halt — so badly that she and star Lauren Graham laughed until they cried.

“Then I suddenly stopped myself,” Chemel said. “I shouldn’t be laughing. The scene isn’t working. … Lauren said, ‘What’s up?’ I looked at her and said, ‘Oh, I just got caught off-guard being happy.’ … And from there we laughed our way back into rehearsing; the scene started to unlock itself. It got funny.

“I’d been painting myself into a corner of seriousness in order to keep failure at bay. Don’t do that. Let joy and spontaneity exist side by side. … Don’t let fear of failure kill your joy.”

Burstein encouraged the graduates to take Chemel’s message of perseverance and career nimbleness to heart as they take that next step, embracing life after Lawrence with a mixture of promise and uncertainty.

“Perhaps her example will help as you, the Class of 2019, set out on the path that begins today,” he said. “You have already raised our expectations for what is possible. We count on your talent, your work, your leadership to move us forward.”

Watch a replay of Lee Chemel’s Commencement speech here.

Lawrence University Provost and Dean of Faculty Catherine Kodat announces the faculty award for Marcia Bjornerud (left) during Sunday’s Commencement ceremony on the Main Hall green.

Awards and farewells

Two long-serving tenured faculty members — psychology professor Bruce Hetlzer and voice professor Kenneth Bozeman — were honored during the ceremony as they retire, each having taught at Lawrence for more than four decades. See details here.

Three faculty awards were announced during the ceremony. Music professor Erin Lesser received the Excellence in Teaching Award, Director of Jazz Studies Jose Encarnacion received the Excellent Teaching by an Early Career Faculty Member Award, and geology professor Marcia Bjornerud received the Excellence in Scholarship or Creative Activity Award. See details here.

For more photos from Sunday’s 2019 Commencement, click here.

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@postcrescent.com

Say cheese: 9 best places to snap a photo on campus

Whether you’re celebrating an achievement, reminiscing on your college days, or visiting campus for the first time, capturing an iconic photo is a must-do before leaving campus. These are the photos that will grace the walls of your parents’ hallways, become your phone wallpaper, and serve as your most-liked Instagram posts.

That’s why we put together this list of the nine best places to snap a photo on campus, so you can capture and share the joy you feel on our gorgeous campus.

Photo of Memorial Chapel on a sunny day with green grass and blue sky.
  1. Memorial Chapel

Starting with the obvious, the stairs of Memorial Chapel serve as an excellent location for capturing cherished memories. Built in 1918, the building has hosted many events including concerts by classic artists such as Count Basie and Ella Fitzgerald (find a Spotify playlist here featuring some of the songs performed on the Chapel stage) and speakers like Maya Angelou.

Photo tip: The steps make for an especially good option for group shots and jumping pictures. For a stunning close-up, have the subject stand on the grass in front of the Chapel and take a photo from the sidewalk to get the full Chapel in the background.

The font side of Main Hall.

2. Main Hall seals

Constructed in 1853, Main Hall is the oldest standing building on campus, and therefore, the most iconic. On the street-facing side of the building, you’ll find the official seals of Lawrence College, Milwaukee-Downer College, and Lawrence University. Snap a picture here in front of the iconic Main Hall pillars to honor the history of Lawrence and the Lawrentians who’ve called it home.

South-facing side of Main Hall featuring a sundial above the door.

3. The Sundial

On the other side of Main Hall, you’ll find a sundial adorning the building above the stairs. The Merrill Hall Sundial was transferred to Lawrence as a gift of the Milwaukee-Downer class of 1932 in 1973, and was formally installed and dedicated on the south face of Main Hall in 1975. Not only does it tell time, but it also offers a unique backdrop for your photos with a built-in timestamp.

Photo of the Project 562 mural on the exterior wall of the Buchanan Kiewit Wellness Center featuring a pink and yellow sunset with photos of local tribal members in traditional regalia overlaying the sun.
Photo of colorful mural located in downtown Appleton, Wisconsin featuring a wolf in a boat, a fox on a bike, and other personified creatures in action.

4. Murals

Lawrence and Appleton are brimming with creative murals that capture the culture and artsy nature of the community. Our new “Indigenize Education” mural by Project 562 on the Wellness Center wall is a good option for an especially powerful photo. You can also take a short jaunt down College Ave. to find colorful backgrounds.

Sign on the corner of campus that reads "Lawrence University. Founded in 1847."

5. Lawrence University sign

A gift from the Class of 1960, the Lawrence University sign on the corner of Drew St. and College Ave. offers one of the only photo opportunities that includes the name of the University. Lean against the sign or take a seat on top! When you gram that perfect picture, don’t forget to tag @LawrenceUni or hashtag #LarryU so we can see your masterpiece.

Photo of Main Hall through the glass walkway of the Conservatory.

6. Conservatory walkway

There’s something inviting about the way the glass opens up at the top of the stairs. Snap a picture here to celebrate the omnipresent musicality so essential to the Lawrence experience. For a shot with Main Hall in the background, take a picture through the walkway with the camera pointed south. If you’re feeling extra edgy, you can try to capture a reflection photo off the glass.

Photo of Aerial Landscape Sculpture which consists of three large yellow arches outside of the Wriston Art Gallery.

7. Aerial landscape sculpture

By the late Rolf Westphal, Lawrence’s first Frederick R. Layton Distinguished Visiting Professor in Studio Art, “Aerial Landscape” can be found outside the Wriston Art Center. Originally installed in 1988, this bright trio of yellow arched structures have become a recognizable landmark on campus. Stand or sit under the arches for this beautiful shot.

A large boulder freshly painted green reads "Class of 2019" and sits in front of Main Hall.

8. The Rock

Often freshly painted for upcoming events, The Rock has been a Lawrence icon, above and below ground, for over 100 years. Brought to campus as a hiking souvenir by seniors in 1895 and buried by the Class of 1967 for 19 years, The Rock went missing from 1998 to 2018. A podcast, “No Stone Unturned” by Sarah Axtell ’17 and Jon Hanrahan ’16, documents their search for The Rock. (**Spoiler Alert: They found it.**) With a storied history such as this, The Rock not only makes for an interesting photo, but comes with tons of caption potential.

Word to the Wise: You never do know how fresh the paint may be, so be careful when taking a seat on The Rock.

A clock face sits atop a green pole on a concrete platform with the library in the background.

9. The Clock

A gift from the Class of 1995, this clock is a beloved and recognized spot on campus by the many Lawrentians who passed it daily on the way to class. The platform offers the chance to get off the ground and take a photo with either the library or Steitz/Youngchild in the background.

Have other favorite places to snap photos on/near campus? Let us know in the social media comments. Regardless of where you take your iconic Lawrence photos, please tag @lawrenceuni or #LarryU when you post them so we can marvel at (and maybe even repost) your dazzling pictures!


Lee Chemel: Commencement speaker on her spark for the arts, early struggles and working with TV’s biggest stars

Lee Chemel

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

Lee Shallat Chemel ’65 has been doing a fair bit of soul searching.

Since graduating from Lawrence University 54 years ago, Chemel has forged an impressive career as a director, first in theater and then in television — a 10-year stint as a conservatory director at South Coast Repertory in Orange County, California, eventually led to a more than three-decade run working behind the scenes on some of the most iconic shows in TV history.

Now she returns to Lawrence as the 2019 Commencement speaker on Sunday, June 9, ready to impart insight and wisdom drawn from a professional career that she says has everything to do with the liberal arts education she received at Milwaukee-Downer College and then Lawrence.

“It’s forced me to investigate my entire life,” she said with a laugh. “It’s been a fascinating experience.”

She’ll be joined at the Lawrence Commencement ceremony by her husband, David, and her daughter, Lizzy. Her son, Tucker, won’t be able to make it.

Details on 2019 Commencement, related events

19 things to know about Lawrence’s 2019 Commencement

Without stealing from her Commencement speech —no spoiler alerts here — we chatted with Chemel, an English major as an undergraduate, about her journey, her deep affection for Lawrence and why she has a special fondness for Michael J. Fox, Lauren Graham and Jason Bateman.

On how Milwaukee-Downer and Lawrence — she was part of the first Downer class to merge with Lawrence, spending her first three years in Milwaukee and her senior year in Appleton — lit a fire in her for the arts and planted the seed that a career in the arts might be possible: 

“My path to theater happened because of Lawrence. And that’s kind of significant. I never thought I would ever enter the arts of any kind as a way to live. Being a woman who was brought up in the ’40s and then the ’50s, I didn’t even foresee that possibility for myself. 

“I grew up in very modest circumstances, five people in a one-bedroom apartment when I was young. I didn’t have big dreams of anything except going to college. That was a big deal to me. I loved my teachers, so I thought I really want to teach. I never had the dream of doing anything in the arts. It didn’t seem like it would be practical enough. It just never occurred to me that that would be something I would do.”

On seeing her first theater production at Lawrence, a staging of Macbeth directed by David Mayer III:

“I was just blown away by it. I had done some theater. I wasn’t one of those kids who did musicals and stuff in high school, but at Downer I had done theater. And I was just blown away by this production.”

On her early mentors in theater at Lawrence, Mayer and Ted Cloak:

“When I got to Lawrence, I decided I would take an acting class from Ted Cloak, who was probably one of the best acting teachers I have ever had, even including the three years I spent with Duncan Ross (in a professional acting program in Seattle) and all these other fabulous people. But Ted Cloak was a wonderful acting teacher, and he loved theater and understood it, and the productions they did, they were just phenomenal.

“I really believe that because of David Mayer and Ted Cloak, I found that theater was more than I thought it was. I really loved it although I still didn’t buy the idea of it as a career at that point. But I became much closer to that idea. Lawrence opened my eyes completely to the richness of the arts, particularly the theater and the film arts. It was remarkable what an influence it had on me.”

On making the transition from Milwaukee-Downer to Lawrence:

“I was only at Lawrence for one year. But it was a year that was packed with amazing things for me. Downer was a very good school in that the professors there were kind of radical. … They were sharp people. They radicalized me politically. Got me involved in the Civil Rights movement. Linus Pauling came to talk with us, Upton Sinclair. It was amazingly rich for a tiny, tiny school. But Lawrence took that and just broadened it – everything became broadened and deepened.”

On ditching her teaching career for theater after she and then-husband Phil Shallat moved to Seattle so he could study theater in graduate school:

“I was teaching high school there. … He said, there’s a new thing they’re doing (at the University of Washington School of Drama), a professional acting training program. I said, wow, that is so cool. Meanwhile, I had applied to teach at a terrific private school there. … But Phil suggested I also audition for that M.F.A. program. And I did, just on a lark. And on the same week, I got an acceptance into the (acting) program and an offer for my total dream teaching job. I held those two envelopes up and went back and forth and said, oh, heck, I’m going to do the acting thing. It was a whim almost.”

On her forays into acting after earning a master’s in fine arts from Washington’s Professional Actor Training Program:

“I acted in Seattle, but I knew somewhere in my head that acting, I just didn’t have a tremendous passion for it. I liked it. I loved doing it. But it wasn’t complete for me. I wasn’t secure with it or something.”

On her introduction to directing:

“I moved away from Seattle and down to San Francisco and then I got a job at South Coast Repertory in 1975, and they didn’t hire me for acting but they hired me to teach in the conservatory. And that led me to teaching at the colleges around there, so I was kind of cobbling together a bunch of teaching jobs but then what happened is Orange Coast College said we don’t have the money for you to teach next quarter but do you want to direct a play? So, I directed The Rivals, an 18th Century English play that I really liked. And I fell in love with directing right then and there.”

On embracing and thriving as a theater director, earning five L.A. Drama Critics Awards along the way:

“It all happened through my education in a way. If I hadn’t had the background of this liberal arts education I wouldn’t have been able to make a living doing the teaching part while I searched for what finally struck home for me — the directing.”

On turning to TV directing in the mid-1980s:

“That was another leap. That was like a crazy leap where I was now a resident director at South Coast Repertory. … I’d done some good directing, a lot of directing, to the point where in L.A., I had a little bit of a name. There weren’t a lot of women directing in theater then. 

“But I began to wish sometimes in productions I directed that I could do a close up. That sort of made me realize, maybe you really need to look at film. I applied to the AFI, the American Film Institute; they had a program for helping women get into film. But I didn’t get accepted. I continued to direct in L.A., and my friend Joe Stern, who was a producer on Law and Order, knew TV people as well as theater people. He said, Gary Goldberg has this new show called Family Ties. He’s looking for a woman director because there was some pressure at the time to start hiring women. You can see how far that got after 35 years.

“He said he wants someone who was good with actors, not just technical. I went in and I met Gary Goldberg, and he liked me, and we were the same age, so that was cool. He said, come in and observe. … So, after almost 10 years (at South Coast), I just quit. I had no idea if this was going to take me anywhere or whether I would succeed or not. I just moved up to L.A. and started observing on Family Ties, and I remember I was observing that show from August until, I think, October. … I started borrowing money from my boyfriend, … and then finally on the schedule my name came up for a show in February. So that’s how it all started.”

On how difficult the transition to TV proved to be:

“I think I did six to eight episodes of Family Ties. But not all before I moved on. That year I did one, then the next year I did two. Family Ties people knew me before I stepped up and they were there to support me because I’d been observing there and they were kind to someone just starting out. You go to other shows and they don’t know that. They just know that you don’t know what you’re doing yet. So those are tough times. Part of my speech is how tough it was. You get a few episodes and you try to develop. … You try to get as many gigs as you can and hopefully make a good impression so they’ll ask you back. What I realized is it takes 10 years to be good at that. And we were live-cutting shows. That was really, really hard.

“I had the support of knowing that I was educated. And that sounds weird, but it was actually quite significant to me that I knew things. I knew I could analyze a script, I knew that I could understand things. I could communicate well, I understood tone, I understood people. I was older than a lot of people who start. So, I had lived some life, too. And these were the things that buoyed me up during these very tough times.”

On highlights of a career that would include directing and/or producing work on Murphy Brown, Spin City, Northern Exposure, Arrested Development, Gilmore Girls, and The Middle, among others:

“Murphy Brown was certainly a big jump up for me. That’s when my agent finally talked somebody into getting me onto what you’d call a real major show. Working with such good writers. … And once I had Murphy Brown under my belt, that got me an Emmy nomination, and, all of a sudden, I was kind of accepted. I was brought into the club, I guess you could say.”

On her latest work, a nine-year run as director on The Middle:

“I got to be full-time on that for nine years, and we all became a family. That was a wonderful experience.”

On directing Michael J. Fox, first on Family Ties and later on Spin City, when, unbeknownst to most, he was beginning his battle with Parkinson’s disease:

“Michael J. Fox, I love to talk about him. Initially, Family Ties was supposed to be about two hippie parents who all of a sudden discovered that their kids are conservative. It was that reversal thing. But here comes this guy playing the conservative son who likes Nixon and stuff, and he was so funny and so inventive, and what happens in comedy is that the writers want their jokes to sail, so they start writing for that guy because he’s so good. All of a sudden, the show flipped, because Michael was so damn funny it became more centered on him. He became the star of the show.

“Michael is an interesting guy. He plays the comedy so well and it was a delight to watch him develop and sail, and you take good writers and then you take this great young actor and you watch it as they just start feeding each other. That was quite a wonderful thing to see. I loved watching that.

“Then I got to work with him on Spin City for a whole year in New York. And that’s when I learned that he had Parkinson’s. Nobody knew about it except me and Gary Goldberg because they didn’t want to make it public yet. And it was very challenging for Michael. But he was ever wonderful and I admire him so much.”

On working with Lauren Graham on Gilmore Girls, first as a director, then as an executive producer:

“Lauren Graham and I became friends during that last season on Gilmore Girls. It was very challenging because Amy Sherman-Palladino, the creator of the show, went away and that took the heart of the writing with it. Now she’s doing The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, and she’s a brilliant writer. But here we were with a whole year to do the final season of the show; the actors and writers worked incredibly hard to keep the tone of the show consistent. That is a very hard thing to do when for all previous years, Amy had written most of the scripts. Bless those writers and Lauren, they did a phenomenal job.”

On her respect for Jason Bateman, who she directed on Arrested Development:

“I love Jason Bateman. I adore him. Jason and I did a few pilots together before Arrested Development. A lot of the network people thought he was going to be or should be the next Michael J. Fox. But he wasn’t, that wasn’t Jason’s humor.

“I think he went through some real struggles, and then all of a sudden Mitch Hurwitz writes this brilliant series called Arrested Development and it taps into the real place where Jason can shine. I was so happy for him because it validated him, and now he’s got a great, great career. And he’s the nicest guy in the world and he was just very lovely to work with always.” 

On whether last year’s series finale of The Middle means the end of her career:

“I don’t know. I did the pilot for a spinoff from The Middle this fall, with the Sue character. It didn’t get picked up. I wrote a note to my agents and said, I’m not dead yet. But I don’t know. I feel maybe it’s time to give back again and do some other things. I’m at a crossroads, but I’ll see what comes up next season.”

On returning to Lawrence while not knowing what comes next:

“I’m like the graduates in a way. What am I going to do now? I just want to be open to stuff. I feel like I am in an interesting place in my life.”

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

Lawrence University students earn national, regional fellowships

National fellowship award recipients from Lawrence University include (clockwise from top left) Hayoung Seo, Margot (Margaret) Wulfsberg, Willa Dworschack, Milou (Emmylou) de Meji, and Meghan Murphy.

Five Lawrence University students have earned nationally competitive fellowships for the 2019-20 academic year.

Two others have earned notable regional fellowship awards.

The national fellowships include:

Milou (Emmylou) de Meij ’19: The Fulbright U.S. Student Program. She will work as an English teaching assistant in Latvia.

Margot (Margaret) Wulfsberg ’19: She was awarded a Critical Language Scholarship to study Chinese in Changchun, China.

Willa Dworschack ’20: She is the recipient of the Barry Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation award in physics and astronomy.

Meghan Murphy ’19: She was awarded the Thomas J. Watson Fellowship, and will be doing music explorations with violins and violin-like instruments in five different countries.

Hayoung Seo ’19: The Yenching Academy Fellowship covers a full year of graduate study at Yenching Academy of Peking University in China. She will be pursuing a master’s degree in China Studies, with a focus on Confucianism.

The regional fellowship winners include:

Alex Medina ’21 and Nero Dejno ’21: They received the Graduate School Exploration Fellowship (GSEF) that provides awards for undergraduates at ACM (Associated Colleges of the Midwest) schools, with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. It provides undergraduates with mentoring and career development in their junior and senior years, along with an experiential research opportunity with one of the Big 10 research universities courtesy of the Big 10 Academic Alliance.

For more on fellowship and scholarship opportunities, click here.

Two Wisconsin teachers to receive Lawrence’s annual teaching award

Joann Kekula (left) and Paula Meyer

Two teachers, one from central Wisconsin and one from the Fox Valley, are being honored as recipients of Lawrence University’s 2019 Outstanding Teaching in Wisconsin Award.

This year’s honorees are Joann Kekula, a band director at Wittenberg-Birnamwood Middle and High School, and Paula Meyer, a Spanish teacher at Appleton North High School.

Recipients are nominated by Lawrence seniors and selected on their abilities to communicate effectively, create a sense of excitement in the classroom, motivate their students to pursue academic excellence while showing a genuine concern for them in and outside the classroom. Since launching the award program in 1985, Lawrence has recognized 70 state teachers.

Kekula and Meyer will be honored at Saturday’s Baccalaureate Service in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel, part of Commencement weekend activities.

Joanne Kekula

Kekula, of Bowler, earned her Bachelor of Music Education degree from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire in 1985 and her Master’s of Music Education degree from UW-Stevens Point in 1995.

She has taught at Wittenberg-Birnamwood since 1986. She has membership in several National Honor Societies, including Alpha Kappa Lambda (music), Kappa Delta Pi (education), and Phi Kappa Phi (scholastic achievement). She also belongs to Sigma Alpha Iota, a music fraternity for women.

Kekula is on the regional executive board of the Wisconsin Education Association and is active with the National Band Association. She has been on the Wisconsin Ambassadors of Music staff since 2006 and has been a leader on student performance tours in seven European countries.

Paula Meyer

Meyer, of Appleton, earned her Bachelor of Science degree, with majors in mathematics and Spanish, from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point in 1990 and her Master’s of Arts in Education from Viterbo University in La Crosse in 1998.

She has worked in the Appleton Area School District as a Spanish teacher since 1990.

She is a member of the American Council on Teaching Foreign Languages and the Wisconsin Association for Language Teachers (WAFLT). She was named the WAFLT Teacher of the Year in 2013 and earned the WAFLT Recognition of Merit Award in 2005.

In 2014, Meyer earned National Board certification as a teacher for world languages other than English.

She’s been active in distance running and has been an advocate for people struggling with addictions.

For information on Lawrence’s Teacher Certification program, click here.

11 most productive places to hit the books before finals

Story by Awa Badiane ’21

As the term winds to an end, students here at Lawrence are entering finals week. And in order to end the term with a bang, we need to make sure we can buckle down and focus on all the assignments and tests. For that, we need a quiet place to study. To help you find your productivity nirvana, I have compiled this list of 11 of the best study spots on or near campus. You’re welcome.

1) Unused Classrooms 

This may come as a surprise to a lot of students, but students have access to classrooms that are not in use. Using your Lawrence ID, students can access lots of the classrooms throughout campus. This gives you access to white boards, larger tables, and sometimes even computers! That can be especially handy when studying with friends.  

2) Science Atrium 

Here at Lawrence, there are two building dedicated to the sciences, Youngchild and Steiz Hall. Connecting these two buildings is a spacious and bright atrium on the first floor. This space is equipped with tables, chairs and lots of natural light, perfect for studying on a sunny day.   

3) Fourth floor of the Warch Campus Center  

The Fourth Floor of the Warch Campus Center is a good choice for all different types of studiers! It is filled with tables, chairs and comfy couches. There are also two meeting rooms that are available to students, and a full computer with a printer. It doesn’t hurt that Warch is where the dining areas are located, so if you get hungry as you study or feel the need for a little snack, food is just steps away.  

4) Sabin House 

The house with the green doors across from Kohler Hall is a space for students to explore their religious identity. But this quiet meditative space doubles as an inviting space for peaceful, quiet studying. Filled with couches, rolling chairs, and a fully stocked kitchen, Sabin House is the perfect space for students who are more productive in quiet places. 

5) Hiett Lounge Rooms 

Arguably one of the best dorms on campus, Hiett Hall is filled with spacious lounge rooms (at least one on each floor). All of the lounges are fully furnished with tables and chairs. Best of all, if you’re starting to feel a bit overwhelmed, there is a fully functioning massage chair in the fourth-floor lounge.  

6) Purple Room in Trever Hall basement  

Most dorms have lounge spaces in their basements, but there is something about the lounge room in the basement of Trever Hall that is especially ideal for studying. Like most lounges, it is filled with chairs, couches, and can hold a pretty large crowd. I think it might be the purple paint in the lounge that really inspires a great study session. 

7) Science Bridge 

The two science buildings on campus are not only connected by an atrium on the first floor, there also is a bridge on the third floor that connects the buildings. With all the same charms as the first floor, there is the bonus of a great view of the Fox River from up there.  

8) Quad 

As the weather warms up, it can be nearly impossible to spend the whole day inside. The wonderful thing about an open campus with lots of green space is you don’t have too! There are many perch-worthy spots outside on campus perfect for studying. The grass on the Quad is a prime example. Just throw down a blanket and hit the books amid the sunshine. And don’t worry about not being able to use the WIFI; thanks to all the houses surrounding the Quad, you will be able to connect to the WIFI without issue. 

9) Third Floor of the Library  

The library is usually the first-place people go to get some good studying in, but what many people don’t know is each of the library’s floors have designated volume levels to fit different learners’ studying needs. As you make your way to the top floor, it gets progressively quieter, with the fourth floor designated for silent study. But if you are just looking for a quiet study spot, the third floor is your best bet. 

10) Cooper Rock  

I’ve learned, sometimes being in the same place for too long can crush your productivity. This is why I like to switch it up a bit and take my studying off campus. Copper Rock café is only a few blocks away from campus on College Avenue and can kickstart some great studying. The café is composed of two sections: the first section is the louder general area where people order and sit down to eat, while the second section is dedicated to soft conversation and quiet study.  

11) Lou’s Brews 

While a change of scenery can improve a study session, I do understand those who do not want to venture too far off campus. This cozy coffee shop right across the street from Colman Hall is an excellent spot to grab a smoothie and crack the books off campus.  

Awa Badiane ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Three for three: France teaching assignments a sign of growth for Francophone program

Cosette Bardawil ’19 is one of three Lawrence students earning teaching assignments in France.

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

Three Lawrence seniors have been awarded competitive assistant teaching positions through TAPIF (Teaching Assistant Program in France), a program that gives American citizens the opportunity to teach English in public schools in France, as well as in other Francophone locations such as French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Martinique and Réunion.

This is Lawrence’s most successful year with TAPIF yet; the highest number of applicants and a 100 percent acceptance rate. This year’s recipients — Kendra L. Van Duine ’19, Christian Lee Messier ’18 and Cosette Bardawil ’19 — will spend seven months of the next academic year in France in an immersive teaching and learning experience.

Lawrence students have been awarded assistant teaching positions through TAPIF in the past, but this year’s success shows the strides that have been made in Francophone Studies.

“Maybe five years ago we had probably one or two (applicants) and now we’re having more people apply … and everybody’s getting in,” said Eilene Hoft-March, Milwaukee-Downer College and College Endowment Association Professor of Liberal Studies and French professor. “Not everybody we nominated (in the past) got in, and I can’t remember that we had three and four people applying at one time, and now we do.”

But the success is no surprise to Hoft-March because the quality of the applicant pool is now so good.

“I think our applicants have been very serious,” she said. “When you look at the three people who’ve won, they’re very good students, they’ve applied themselves, and it’s not surprising to me at all that they’ve been placed.”

Perhaps this year’s success will herald more applicants and awardees in the future. Hoft-March sees it as a sign of growing appreciation for the academic excellence at Lawrence.

“I think that Lawrence may have risen in terms of being recognized for the quality of students we have, and I think that’s a really good thing,” she said.

For more on the French and Francophone Studies program, click here.

And the recipients are . . .

Kendra L. Van Duine ’19

Kendra L. Van Duine ’19 will be teaching in Rouen, France. Linguistic and cultural immersion through TAPIF will be valuable experience toward her goal of becoming a foreign language interpreter, translating French, Spanish, and Chinese into English. This will be her first time traveling abroad alone, and for such a long period of time. But she’s looking ahead with eagerness.

“I am very excited to have this opportunity and hope it will help me gain confidence in myself by helping other students with their foreign language skills,” Van Duine said. “I’m looking forward to getting out on my own and exploring France and the neighboring countries, as well as exploring who I am as an individual.”

Van Duine is a double-major in French and Spanish. In addition to being an RLA in Small Exec and an on-campus events coordinator for the LU People for Animal Welfare (PAW) club, she works as a research assistant in the French and Francophone Studies department.

Christian Messier ’18

Christian Messier ’18 double majored in French and music. He will be teaching at the primary school level in Tours-Orléans. For three summers he has worked at Concordia Language Villages, an immersive language summer camp, and was a French tutor at Lawrence. While assistant teaching in France, he hopes to explore other languages and expand his teaching into the realm of music.

“I’m really looking forward to working with new language learners, and hopefully I’ll be able to also teach music lessons at nearby schools,” Messier said. “I’m planning on reading a lot and traveling to various cities in France, Germany, Spain, Portugal and Italy to work on developing my abilities in those respective languages.”

Cosette Bardawil ’19

Cosette Bardawil ’19 will teach at the Académie de Rennes. The French and flute performance major is a French tutor and a LARY Buddy. She plays in the orchestra and in chamber groups, and aims to pursue music and self-exploration along with sharpening her language skills.

“My hopes for this upcoming adventure are to improve my French, help students as much as possible, explore different ways of teaching, play in some music ensembles and discover more about myself, others, and France,” Bardawil said.

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Project 562 mural returns to exterior wall of Wellness Center

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

The mural is back.

Members of Matika Wilbur’s Project 562 team returned to Lawrence University in recent days to work with Native American students to restore a mural on the side of the Buchanan Kiewit Wellness Center that was first created as part of a mid-April convocation.

Due to harsh weather in April, the Project 562 Indigenous Land Project mural was unable to properly cure during its installation. Members of LUNA (Lawrence University Native Americans) and UWGB’s Intertribal Student Organization continued to work closely with the Project 562 artistic team to repair the mural once weather conditions improved.

That work has now paid off. The large mural, featuring the faces of three generations of Native Americans, is back in place. It includes the words Indigenize Education.

The mural was not created to be a permanent installation. The wheat paste project is expected to last two to five years, depending in part on weather conditions.

Wilbur, creator and director of Project 562, has used photography and art installations to tell the story of Native American communities.

“I’m so proud of you,” Wilbur said at the time of the April convocation, addressing the more than a dozen Native American students from Lawrence and UWGB who helped create the mural. “And I’m proud of Lawrence for taking this huge step. This is a huge step to have indigenous representation on a college campus.”

Wilbur, a visual storyteller from the Swinomish and Tulalip tribes of coastal Washington, has been traveling the country — and beyond — as part of Project 562, visiting close to 900 tribal communities in all. The 562 is a reference to the number of federally recognized tribes in the United States at the time the project launched in 2012.

After her travels are done, Project 562 is expected to live on in books, exhibitions, lecture series, web sites, new curriculum and podcasts, Wilbur said.

“Matika has a magical way of giving our Native students and their allies permission to acknowledge and be proud of their own cultural traditions, families and indigenous ways, even in spaces that may have not been historically designed for us,” Brigetta Miller, an associate professor of music in the Lawrence Conservatory of Music and a member of the Stockbridge-Munsee (Mohican) Nation, said at the convocation.

“This work is more than making art for the sake of social justice,” she said. “It’s a way to truthfully show who we are. It’s a way for us to tell our own story.”

Wilbur’s April convocation address speaks to the heart of Project 562

Project 562’s creator looks to reshape narrative on Native communities

For more on LUNA student organization, click here.

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu