Tag: Lawrence students

Big chill: 8 fun winter activities that beckon, on and off campus

Olivia Sibbet '23 tosses a snowball as she plays in the snow on the Lawrence campus.
Olivia Sibbet ’22 enjoys an early snowfall on the Lawrence campus. (Photo by Danny Damiani)

Story by Alex Freeman ’23

It’s that time of year again.

Whether you’re the type to wear shorts until it drops below zero or the one who bars the windows and gets cozy under a blanket with some hot tea, one thing is certain: Lawrence makes it easy to make the most of winter.

As we move deeper into February, here are a few activities to help you take advantage of all that Lawrence has to offer in terms of winter fun.

1: Skate on Ormsby Lake

Ormsby Lake is officially frozen and open to Lawrence students. This is a classic student favorite that always comes with the changing of the seasons, so it’s time to practice some broomball, bust out the figure skates or just take a spin around the pond with a few friends.

With easy access right across from the entrance to Ormsby Hall, skating on the rink is the perfect way to brighten up a lazy Sunday or blow off some steam right after class. And don’t worry if you left your skates at home (or never had any to begin with) — you can pick up some skates on the cheap at Play It Again Sports in Appleton.

2: Shop at the Community Public Market

For the people who miss seeing booths lined up down sunny College Avenue for the Downtown Appleton Farm Market at the beginning of Fall Term, the Community Public Market might be the perfect stand-in.

Until the Downtown Appleton Farm Market returns in June, Appleton residents have the opportunity to experience the Community Public Market from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Feb. 8, March 12 and April 18. Shoppers will be able to have the bustling Farm Market experience while cozily tucked away from the cold in the Fox Cities Exhibition Center, just an 8-minute walk from Lawrence’s campus.

Whether you’re looking for fresh snacks to take back to your dorm room, a ready-to-go meal to fulfill your non-Commons food craving or an environment where you can appreciate live music and art, the Community Public Market is a winter destination.

3: Play in the snow on Main Hall Green

Shae Erlandson makes a snow angel on Main Hall Green.
Shae Erlandson ’23 joins friends in making snow angels on Main Hall Green. (Photo by Danny Damiani)

When the snow starts coming down, the grassy area in front of Main Hall turns into a winter wonderland, full of opportunities for classic (and snowy) fun. From making tranquil snow sculptures and snow angels on the lawn to competing in snowball fights with teams and forts, Main Hall Green becomes Main Hall White as students bundle up and brave the chill.

Requiring no preparation or planning (other than dressing warm), playing in the snow outside of Main Hall is the perfect way to pass the time when you find yourself just sitting in your residence hall, trying to find something to do. The only requirement: remember to wear your gloves!

4: Order some hot chocolate at Lou’s Brew

As much as we all love Kaplan’s Café, it can be nice to venture just off campus to break from routine, and Lou’s Brew is the perfect place to do that.

With a prime location only one block away from Brokaw Hall, Lou’s Brew is close enough to campus that even students born near the equator can manage the brisk walk — plus, it’s easy to warm up with a toasty hot chocolate or latte as soon as you get inside (for tea-drinkers like me, their London Fog is an all-time fave). Lou’s Brew offers 10 percent off cash orders for Lawrence students if they present their student ID before paying.

For students willing to walk a bit further from campus. College Avenue is lined with plenty of other coffee shops that will satisfy that hot-drink craving, including Brewed Awakenings, Copper Rock and ACOCA Coffee.

5: Visit the Bubolz Nature Preserve

If you want to revel in the beauty of winter, there’s nowhere better than Wisconsin. Within the Fox Cities, the must-see destination for experiencing a stunning winter is the Bubolz Nature Preserve.

Roughly a 15-minute drive from campus, the preserve features hiking, walking, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing trails that are open from dawn to dusk throughout the winter. If you want to make a day of it, the Bubolz Nature Preserve also hosts special events, like their candlelight ski/snowshoe and their beginners’ ski clinics (which are an absolute necessity for those of us from the flatlands of the southern Midwest).

Regardless of skill level, the Bubolz Nature Preserve will have some kind of winter activity for you.

6: Roast s’mores in the dorm fireplaces

Although not every residence hall has its own fireplace, most of them do, and you can stop by the CA desk to schedule a time when you can get some friends together and hone your marshmallow-roasting skills. (Golden brown all around is 100% the perfect roast, no matter what anyone else says.)

It’s easy to ignore the wind outside when you’re basking in the heat of the flames.

In order to set up a s’more-making session in a dorm fireplace, you just need to reach out to your Community Advisor or Residence Hall Director so a CA can get trained to build a safe fire. Once that’s done, all you need to do is gather some blankets, find a few sticks and stock up on supplies from the Corner Store.

7: Sled down Memorial Hill

Tucked right behind the Viking Room in Memorial Hall, the hill leading down to the SLUG is a go-to destination for sledding. As the perfect way to de-stress after a long week, sledding down Memorial Hill is another staple of Winter Term, much like skating on Ormsby Lake.

Just request a sled from a CA or RHD, put on some snow boots and get ready to go fast. Winter is here, and Lawrence students are ready to enjoy the winter wonderland.

8: Go to some of the many Lawrence events happening every day

With a student body as involved and accomplished as Lawrence’s, there are a multitude of diverse events happening every day on campus. From musical performances to lectures from faculty and staff, from Wellness Center Yoga classes to exhibitions at the Wriston Center, there is never a shortage of events to attend.

The Lawrence events page is constantly being updated with more upcoming events, so Lawrence students can be sure that they will find something that resonates with them. No matter the weather, there is always something to do within a short walking distance of the residence halls. It might just take the chill out of winter.

Alex Freeman ’23 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Lawrence students “Pop the Bubble” to bring together campus, community artists

A Lawrence student plays guitar during a Pop the Bubble event at The Draw in Appleton.
Lawrence students performed at The Draw in mid-October as part of a Pop the Bubble event. (Photos by Sebastian Evans ’21)

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

If you’ve ever talked to Lawrentians about their relationship with the Appleton community, you’ve probably heard a reference to the “Lawrence bubble.” In the Lawrence University lexicon, the term refers to campus as its own world in which some students may feel a disconnect from the surrounding community.

Emily Austin ’20 challenged this sentiment by starting Pop the Bubble.

Twice a month, this student-run program puts together an evening of various artistic performances by Lawrence students at The Draw, a multipurpose venue located along Lawe Street just a short walk south of campus. Each event centers around a theme chosen to spur conversation and build relationships between students and community members.

“Creating that open space and communication is the main goal of this project,” Austin said. “I think we often get stuck in the bubble, yet we have so much to learn from the community and they have so much to learn from us.”

Austin, a double major in music performance (voice) and English, was inspired to pop the bubble last spring when she took American Roots Music, a Conservatory of Music course co-taught by Grammy-nominated musician Cory Chisel and Dean of the Conservatory Brian Pertl. Students in the class bonded through writing and performing their own American roots music.

It was the students’ final performance at The Draw that inspired Pop the Bubble. Organizers at the venue invited the Lawrentians back to perform any time they wanted for free. A new door into the Appleton community was opened, and Austin jumped at the opportunity.

“I thought, ‘This is so cool, we have to do this,’” Austin said. “It would be an opportunity to bridge the gap between Appleton community artists and Lawrence University artists. It would also give musicians on campus a space to perform and feel comfortable outside of the Con and campus spaces.”

Two visitors look over artwork on display at The Draw during a recent Pop the Bubble event.
Pop the Bubble events are a mix of music, art, spoken word, and more.

The first Pop the Bubble show resembled an open mic night where Lawrence students performed for a local audience. The shows have since developed to focus on a theme that unites performers and audience, Lawrentians and community members alike. The most recent show, Stories of Home, asked all to share their personal experiences and memories from home. Performances included spoken word, music and film. Audience members wrote and drew their stories from home on Post-it notes that were collected at the end of the night; just one of the ways Pop the Bubble works to collaborate and connect with the people of Appleton.

The Pop the Bubble team has grown to include student artists of many disciplines, including a dancer, a visual artist, and creative writers. And it’s not just students who are interested. Community members, especially local artists, have reached out to the Pop the Bubble team expressing a desire to work with Lawrence students.

“The community we’ve found here has been so welcoming and excited about the project,” Austin said. “There’s a desire to get our students out and working and making those connections.

“I think if the Appleton community knew about what we were doing on this campus, especially in the Con and in the arts, there would be a little bit more acceptance of each other. It would become a way to share those ideas and collaborate on a human level.”

Two participants fill out Post-it Notes as part of a "Stories From Home" theme at a recent Pop the Bubble event.
Participants at a Pop the Bubble event at The Draw in October use Post-it notes to share stories, part of a “Stories of Home” theme.

Singer-songwriter and theatre major Caro Granner ’20 has been on the Pop the Bubble team since the beginning.

“When I came in, I felt this really warm, inviting energy,” Granner said of the Stories of Home event during fall term. “People were able to come together and enjoy each other’s company and create some really cool stuff together. To feel that welcoming, joyful energy at the end of a long week was really rewarding for me.”

Austin and Granner hope to increase student involvement with Pop the Bubble and expand their efforts, including doing fundraising for local nonprofits and arts groups.

Pop the Bubble will schedule its next event in winter term.

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

5 favorite ways Lawrentians get into the Halloween spirit on campus

Two pumpkins with Lawrence logos painted on them rest among the leaves on Main Hall Green.
Happy Halloween from Lawrence University. (Photo by Danny Damiani)

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

Even in the midst of fall midterms, Lawrentians are never too busy to get into the Halloween spirit.

As the holiday draws near, students can be seen spreading Halloween cheer all around campus with a variety of fetes and frights. So warm up that mug of apple cider, put the finishing touches on that costume, and check out some of the favorite ways Lawrence students celebrate Halloween. You might just be inspired to join us.

1. CORE group trick-or-treating

On the Monday before Halloween, CORE leaders and their groups of first-years don costumes and head out for CORE trick-or-treating, a beloved Lawrence Halloween tradition. Starting at 9 p.m., the students go door-to-door for treats at the homes of Lawrence faculty near campus. President Mark Burstein’s home is a popular stop along the way.

The route ends with an afterparty in Memorial Hall, where students can hang out and eat their candy after all the fun.

2. Halloween parties

In the weeks preceding Halloween, students across campus organize their own Halloween-themed parties. These gatherings range from scary movie watch parties to full-blown costume bashes. It’s all about taking a break from midterm stress and spending time with friends.

3. Haunted house trip

Are you feeling brave? Each year, students in search of scares are invited on a road trip to a haunted house in Green Bay. This popular event has limited spots that fill up fast, so it’s important to sign up and pay the $5 fee as early as you can. Bringing along some friends makes for an extra memorable experience. This year’s trip already happened, but there are plenty of haunted houses in the area if you and your friends want to venture out on your own. They continue through Halloween weekend.

4. October Festival

The Diversity and Intercultural Center hosted an evening of festive fun in celebration of October. Students enjoyed caramel apples and root beer floats while designing skeletons and paper lanterns. What better way to wind down halfway through the term?

5. Pumpkin carving

Maybe parties and haunted houses aren’t your thing. Some Lawrentians spend a relaxing afternoon carving or painting pumpkins with friends. A variety of Jack-o-lanterns can now be seen near the entryways of residence halls and on the doorsteps of campus houses.

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

LU joins brief in support of DACA recipients; case heads to Supreme Court

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

Lawrence University has again signed on to an amicus brief that expresses support for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, this time in a case headed to the United States Supreme Court.

Lawrence has joined with 164 other colleges and universities from across the country in signing the amicus brief supporting the roughly 700,000 young immigrants who came to the United States as children and qualify for DACA status.

This “friend of the court” brief was coordinated by the Presidents’ Alliance on Higher Education and Immigration.

Read the brief here.

Lawrence is working in unison with the Presidents’ Alliance in its declaration of support for the young immigrants who have built their lives here and contribute to our campuses, communities and our country’s economy every day. Lawrence is proud to support DACA recipients and echoes the Alliance’s statement that it is vital that universities protect this vulnerable population, President Mark Burstein said.

Two years ago, Lawrence joined dozens of other colleges and universities nationwide to sign two amicus briefs supporting legal challenges to the proposed end of DACA, then part of civil actions at the U.S. District Court level.

Several cases have now been consolidated and will be heard by the U.S. Supreme Court on Nov. 12.

Amicus briefs are legal documents filed by non-litigants with deep interest in a case, advising the court of additional information, perspectives or arguments to consider.

In signing the updated amicus brief, and joining the Presidents’ Alliance, Lawrence is reaffirming its statement of DACA support, Burstein said.

“Ensuring Lawrence remains open to students from all backgrounds who display academic excellence is a core value of this university,” he said in 2017. “DACA has provided a valuable avenue for talented students to pursue a college education and meaningful work.”

The new amicus brief makes the argument that once these young immigrants have an opportunity to access higher education, they tend to flourish, and that’s exactly what DACA was intended to do.

“Amici have seen firsthand the positive effects of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) on their campuses,” the brief reads. “DACA has facilitated the pursuit of higher education by undocumented youth in unprecedented numbers, ensuring that once enrolled, these students are positioned to succeed. As a result of DACA, thousands of talented and hard-working young people have made significant and wide-ranging contributions to amici’s campuses.”

The opportunities that then come with a degree not only benefit the student, but also the economics of the community as these young people go on to pursue professional careers and give back in multiple ways.

“DACA is enlightened and humane; it represents the very best of America,” the brief states. “It provides legal certainty for a generation of hard-working, high-achieving, and determined young people who love this country and were raised here.

“Once at college or university, DACA recipients are among the most engaged students both academically and otherwise. They work hard in the classroom and become deeply engaged in co-curricular activities, supporting communities on and off campus.

“Moreover, our DACA students are deeply committed to giving back to their communities and, more broadly, the country they love. We should not be pushing them out of the country or returning them to a life in the shadows. As institutions of higher education, we see every day the achievement and potential of these young people, and we think it imperative for both us and them that they be allowed to remain here and live out their dreams.”

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

Two Lawrence hockey players launch Little Vikes, a wellness outreach for kids

Jordan Boehlke and Danny Toycen stand in front of the net on a hockey rink at Appleton Family Ice Center.
Jordan Boehlke ’20 and Danny Toycen ’21 stand for a portrait during a recent hockey practice at the Appleton Family Ice Center. Boehlke and Toycen started the Little Vikes student club last year and are looking to grow it this year.

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

How do you get Lawrence students out in the community while also promoting the health of children in the Appleton area? Little Vikes has it figured out.

The club, founded by two Lawrence University men’s hockey players, provides opportunities for athletics and general wellness education to children in the Fox Cities through mentoring and support from Lawrence students. The Lawrence University Community Council (LUCC) approved Little Vikes as an official club last spring, making it a new addition to the school’s repertoire of more than 100 student organizations.

Danny Toycen ’21 and Jordan Boehlke ’20 founded Little Vikes in the summer of 2018. The club isn’t Toycen’s first experience with volunteer work. When he was a junior hockey player in La Crosse, he connected with his community as a peer mentor for younger players.

“We’d bring little kids and youth hockey players into the locker room,” Toycen recalls, “and they’d give us a pep talk or we’d give them fist bumps and stuff like that. They loved it.”

Toycen also assisted Coulee Region Sled Hockey in La Crosse, where individuals with disabilities that prevent them from skating can navigate the ice on sleds. He was moved by seeing people overcome obstacles to be active and have fun playing the sport they love.

He took these experiences with him to Appleton, where he saw a need for mentors for children needing wellness education.

“Getting to do stuff like that is what I really loved,” Toycen says. “I just wanted to do something like that here at Lawrence.”

Thus, Little Vikes was born. It’s still in its infancy, but Toycen and Boehlke say they hope it’ll grow well beyond its dozen members and will establish itself as an active student program that will live on at Lawrence long after they’ve graduated.

The mission is simple, yet has the potential for high impact in the lives it touches.

“We’re trying to promote an active and healthy lifestyle, while still putting an emphasis on education and things like that,” Toycen says. “We want the kids being active, learning sportsmanship and being on a team. Things that come from being an athlete I’ll definitely take into any job or career I choose to follow.”

Since becoming an official club, Little Vikes has been able to plot a clearer course for community outreach. The most recent development is a budding partnership with the Boys and Girls Clubs of the Fox Valley. The club plans to host weekly activities and events at the nonprofit youth organization’s local facilities.

Toycen also is setting his sights on working with SOAR Fox Cities, a local nonprofit and Special Olympics agency that provides a range of programs for disabled individuals.

In the meantime, the club’s activities are geared toward connecting with kids in the Fox Cities and spreading the word about its mission. In November, Little Vikes will hold its second annual Toy Drive for the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin-Fox Valley. The group also will visit classrooms at Horizon Elementary School in Appleton in February to make valentines.

These activities have something to offer the kids involved. And Toycen says Lawrentians need the community exposure that Little Vikes provides.

“It’s always good to help and serve your community in whatever way you can,” he says. “Especially people coming from out of state and out of the country, for them to get a real feel for the Midwest and the Wisconsin lifestyle.”

Despite the focus on athletics, the Little Vikes club is open to anyone on campus dedicated to supporting wellness in Fox Cities youth. The organizers are setting their sights on growth.

“I want to see the club grow,” Toycen says simply. “Part of the reason we went through LUCC is to make sure it stays here. I feel like there’s a need for it. I want to see that need be served each year well after both of us move on.”

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Right at home: Discovering the joys of an (almost) endless Appleton summer

Lawrence University students, from left, Awa Badiane ’21, Carly Beyer ’21, and Chris James ’21 shop at the Downtown Appleton Farm Market on a recent Saturday morning.

Story by Awa Badiane ’21

After finals are done, dorm rooms are packed and the academic year has come to an end, most Lawrence University students go home for the summer. However, there are always some students who decide to stay and take advantage of amazing opportunities — whether it be conducting research with a professor, interning at one of the campus offices, or finding an off-campus job in Appleton.

For those who stay, it’s a chance to experience campus at a slower pace and to see Appleton in a way that just doesn’t happen during the academic year.

I’ve been one of the 146 students who stayed on campus all summer, calling Colman Hall home. I’m a government major from New York who is working as a student writer in the Communications office. I talked with other students who have been here this summer about the Appleton experience.

Spoiler alert: We love it.

Fun in Appleton  

When students are here during the school year, they get so caught up in the abundance of things going on on-campus they rarely get to enjoy the many things Appleton has to offer. With gorgeous weather (usually) and not having classes to worry about, summers at Lawrence give students a chance to do just that.

“This year was my first time at the Mile of Music festival, and it was so much fun,” said Shonell Benjamin ’20. “It was really nice getting to see Appleton come alive the way it did, and the performances I got to see were great.”  

Mile of Music is an Appleton tradition — seven years and running — that many students do not get a chance to experience because it happens during the summer. Over the course of four days in early August, the downtown is filled with live music, all original, with more than 900 performances taking place in 70 venues along a mile stretch of College Avenue. In addition, nearly 50 music education workshops take place, allowing festival-goers to get interactive instruction in diverse forms of music and dance, many of the sessions hosted by Lawrence Conservatory faculty or alumni.

“I got to go to all the Music Education events,” said Thuy Tien Tran ’20, who is majoring in film studies and economics and stayed this summer to work on video projects in the Communications office. “I got to see a lot of great artists from Lawrence. They shared their experience from during their time at Lawrence and how they use that to help other people.” 

Mile of Music, of course, is not the only thing Appleton’s downtown has to offer during the summer months. There’s a myriad of small shops, art studios, restaurants, coffee shops and bars, a weekly Thursday night concert in Houdini Plaza, and every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., the downtown strip gets blocked off and is used for the Downtown Appleton Farm Market.   

“As long as I’ve been here on the weekends, I’ve gone to the farmers market and got stuff for dinner,” said Isabella Mariani ’21, who is studying French, with an English minor, and is working as a student writer in the Communications office. 

With more than 150 vendors selling fresh fruit, vegetables, cheese, meats, baked goods, and other specialty items, the farm market is a beautiful thing, and it’s just steps off of the Lawrence campus.  

“I love the farmers market,” said Briana Wilson ’21, a biology major. “I remember when I went a few weeks ago there was a tornado warning, but the vendors were still set up and people were still shopping. Everyone was just having too much fun to stop.”  

Well, the storm did eventually bring the market to an abrupt stop that morning, but point well taken. The farm market is a must visit if you’re staying on campus for the summer.

Trying something new 

Most students stay on campus because they’ve found an opportunity that allows them to stretch their educational wings.  

“My professor asked me if I was interested in being part of his lab group,” said Benjamin, a biology major. “I thought it would be a cool opportunity, and a chance to take a risk and explore something new.” 

Benjamin previously spent her summers at home in New York City, but she accepted the invite from biology professor Israel Del Toro. She has spent her summer doing work in the biology department, conducting research that is going toward Del Toro’s ongoing study of urban bee habitats. 

“I’m really happy I stayed to do research,” said Benjamin. “I enjoy being part of Professor Del Toro’s lab and working with him. I’m also happy to be part of this research. The work we are doing is important because climate change is real and we have to protect the bees.”   

Samantha Torres, a psychology and theatre arts double major, also from New York, opted to spend her summer in Appleton as well.  

Professor Jesus Smith in the Ethnic Studies Department “told me he was very impressed with my work in the classroom and thought I would be a great assistant for him this summer,” said Torres. “I’d never considered living in Appleton for the summer, but I thought taking the risk would be worth it.” 

Stepping out of her comfort zone turned out to be a decision Torres does not regret. Staying on campus allowed her the opportunity to build transferable skills through research and the chance to experience Appleton in a way she is not able to during the school year.  

“I was especially driven to the research position because of my graduate school plans after Lawrence,” said Torres. “I knew research would make me a standout candidate. But staying also allowed me to meet so many new people and create fond memories that I wouldn’t have during regular term.” 

Than, meanwhile, said she’s learning a ton while spending her summer working with the Lawrence Office of Communications in video production.  

“I make videos that help promote Lawrence and the different aspects of Lawrence,” said Than. 

She started working at her position in the Communications office during the academic year. When she transitioned to a summer position, she wasn’t sure what to expect. 

“I didn’t expect to really get a chance to work on projects,” said Than. “But the whole (video) process, I get to do everything. It’s not just helping and assisting (the director of video production) with his work, I actually can work on my own projects.”     

Keeping it casual

Whether staying on campus or exploring the areas of Appleton near campus, there are plenty of things to do during down time in the summer. The pace is much slower.

“One day me and my friends just decided for dinner we were going to barbeque,” said Wilson. “We barbecued some burgers and then went inside to watch a movie; it was lots of fun.”  

There are tons of opportunities on campus to enjoy being outdoors. There’s a summer exclusive cookout every Wednesday in front of Kaplan’s Café called Griff’s Grill, plus outdoor volleyball games, and tons of spots around campus to enjoy a picnic.

A walk across the College Avenue bridge and a hard left onto S. Walter Street will take you into Telulah Park, home to a skateboard park, a disc golf course, a baseball diamond and a picnic area. It’ll also connect you to the Newberry Trail if you’re looking to hike or bike.

Besides the shopping and dining opportunities along College Avenue, you’re also close to coffee shops and restaurants overlooking the Fox River, some along the Newberry Trail near the Banta Bowl and some a short hike past the tennis courts on Drew Street (think E. Walter Street and S. Olde Oneida Street). Many of them have outdoor decks, allowing you take in the Wisconsin summer in all its glory.

Enjoy it while you can.

Awa Badiane ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Voices from abroad: LU students share takeaways from studying across the globe

Fallon Sellers drinks milk from a coconut while studying in Auckland, New Zealand.
Fallon Sellers ’20 enjoys fresh coconut milk while studying in Auckland, New Zealand.

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

It’s more than traveling the world; students who have enhanced their college experience with off-campus study often return with new perspectives and skills that stay with them for the rest of their lives.

Studying abroad last year made a lasting impression on Jackeline Flores ’19, who studied at the Lawrence University London Centre for her global studies major and Spanish minor.

“Personally, I feel that my experience abroad really solidified the idea that the world truly is my oyster,” she said. “All the knowledge and culture I was exposed to while abroad reminded me that there is so much out there left for me to learn about, which I find super exciting.”

Jackeline Flores takes in a view of the streets of London.
Jackeline Flores ’19 spent a term studying in London.

She’s not alone. We sampled more than a dozen Lawrence students who studied abroad during the past academic year, asking them to share key takeaways from their experience.

So many opportunities

The London Centre satellite campus is just one of 52 life-changing opportunities available to Lawrence students through the off-campus study program.

Each program blends classroom and experiential learning to facilitate students’ personal and academic growth through engagement with different cultures in an immersive learning environment. This leads to a range of profound benefits, says Director of Off-Campus Programs Laura Zuege.

“We know it affords the opportunities for intercultural learning, growth and development that employers time and time again are looking for,” she says. “Study abroad is a laboratory for that kind of development.”

Zuege and her colleagues work tirelessly to make these programs accessible and suitable for students of diverse academic, socioeconomic, social and ethnic backgrounds, by offering programs for every major and addressing students’ varied needs.

For more information on off-campus study, click here.

To see the full list of programs, click here.

“Different students have different concerns in different locations,” Zuege says. “We want to be tuned in with some of our portfolio (program) choices but also with how we approach, prepare and recruit students to be sure we’re reaching a range of the student body that’s representative of our student body.”

This fall, a breakthrough financial aid policy change is making that possible. All of a student’s institutional financial aid — grants, federal loans, scholarships — can now be contributed to off-campus study, in addition to existing study abroad scholarships. In the past, 100 to 120 students went abroad each year; this fall there will be 145.

What they’re saying

Here are a dozen more Lawrence students whose lives changed thanks to off-campus study last year:

Tamima Tabishat poses for a photo overlooking Rabat, Morocco.
Tamima Tabishat ’20 takes in a view overlooking Rabat, Morocco.

Tamima Tabishat ’20, AMIDEAST, area and Arabic language studies in Rabat, Morocco; global studies/German language studies and French language studies: “The most important (impact) was the way it helped me learn how to adapt quickly and smoothly to a new environment. Morocco’s geographic, linguistic, religious, political and cultural elements are very different from my typical academic environment. By studying in a new context, I felt that I was able to adopt new habits, adapt to new customs, and abide by new social rules, all of which are incredibly important skills to have in life. Practicing these things every day taught me how to see everything from a totally new perspective, which has made me not only a more critical thinker, but also a more considerate and tolerant citizen of the world.”

Joe Hedin ’19, Lawrence University London Centre, government/Spanish: “The London Centre allowed me to prepare myself for life after Lawrence. Thanks to the London Centre and Off-Campus programs staff, I had an internship, so I learned how to work in traditional offices, along with learning how to commute to work. I will never be able to put into words how impactful this was.”

Abigail Keefe ’20, IES Paris, language and area studies; violin performance, and mathematics/French and music theory: “Living in France with my host family helped me to improve my skills in the French language way beyond what I ever thought I would be capable of. Living in a country where my native language was not the primary language also helped me to try to understand how it would feel for people living and working in America for whom English is not their native language.”

Ryan Leonard sits in the sand in front of Mount Maunganui.
Ryan Leonard ’19 poses for a photo in Tauranga in front of Mount Maunganui.

Ryan Leonard ’19, IES Auckland, New Zealand, geology: “This experience is going to be one of the biggest selling points in my life after college. From the challenge of moving to a new country alone and having to meet new people, to maintaining good grades and budgeting and making time for travel, I have gained many marketable skills that I may not even realize I have acquired.”

Julia Johnson ’20, IES Vienna, music, cello performance; psychology/pedagogy: “It pushed my boundaries in so many ways such as speaking another language, making friends, being comfortable with public transportation, making travel plans, and not being afraid to explore Vienna and go to performances on my own. I feel like I grew more as a person studying in a new city where they speak another language more than I ever would have on my own campus.”

Ethren Lindsay ’20, Japan; linguistics and Japanese: “I was able to take many classes that would not have been available at my home university, one of which was a translation job. Since I am planning on possibly going into translation as a part of my future work, this was quite literally the most valuable thing that I could have gotten out of college.”

Alice Luo poses for a photo in an urban garden in Berlin.
Alice Luo ’19 visits an urban garden in Berlin.

Alice Luo (Manxin) ’19, IES Berlin, language and area studies; history: “Berlin is such a dynamic city with people coming from all over the world. In America, I felt an urge to be more American and I tried to deny my Chinese identity to some extent in order to better merge into the American culture. In Berlin, with the diverse population and cultures and a seemingly freer atmosphere, which I personally felt, I learned to accept my identity and even celebrate it and appreciate it.”

Juan Marin ’20, IES Freiburg, language and area studies; film studies and German: “I feel like the program taught me how to understand people better. I met a lot of people abroad, and I don’t just mean my classmates and more Americans. I met people from Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Greece, Russia, Bolivia, France, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, Australia, Germany (of course), Morocco, the UK, and more. The program gave me an even higher appreciation for diversity and inclusion.”

Kate Martensis ’20, Budapest, semesters in mathematics education; math and history: “As part of our practicum course, my fellow students and I each had to teach two classes at a local high school. Though the process was not without its difficulties, it was an incredibly valuable experience, and I was so glad to put all the things we’d learned from school visits and our classes into practice. This made me all the more excited to be a teacher.”

Tia Colbert looks up at a wax figure of Sherlock Holmes at the Sherlock Holmes Museum in London.
Tia Colbert ’20 checks out a wax figure of Sherlock Holmes while visiting the Sherlock Holmes Museum in London with her British Crime Fiction class.

Tia Colbert ’20, Lawrence University London Centre, English and Greek/creative writing: “There was a significant focus on using London itself as a textbook, and I feel like that enhanced all the classes. I believe that experiential learning is one of the best ways to engage students, and the London Centre Program definitely delivered in that respect.”

Harry Rivas ’19, ACM Shanghai, economics: “The program had a drastic impact on my life. It changed the way I saw the rest of the world, specifically how I saw China, the impact China has already had on the world, and what is to come. I got to explore a culture and mindset so different from my own.”

Fallon Sellers ’20, IES Auckland, New Zealand, government/international relations: “It was incredibly interesting to interact and work with others my age from a different social and academic culture than mine. Collaborating with them and learning their stances on business and ethical behavior was fascinating, and it was immensely rewarding to observe other points of view outside of the U.S.”

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Goats called in for weed control, and, yes, we put a “Goat Cam” on a goat named Blu

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

APPLETON – Goats are busy working the garden. We’ve got the “Goat Cam” footage to prove it.

Ten goats — two Nigerian dwarf goats and eight fainting goats — have settled into the SLUG garden on the Lawrence University campus, and for the next week will continue to devour unwanted thistle and burdock weeds.

The goats — supplied by Steve Anderson of Mount Morris, owner of the newly launched Goat Busters farm — arrived last Tuesday after Lawrence biology major and SLUG garden manager Floreal Crubaugh ’20 put out a call for rented goats.

“I was looking for more sustainable ways to control the weeds than applying herbicides, and more efficient ways than pulling them up manually,” Crubaugh said.

We attached a GoPro camera — our “Goat Cam” — to the back of one of the goats. We let Blu show us the work in progress on a Monday morning in the garden. Be warned: the footage is adorable and may steal a large chunk of your day.

The SLUG (Sustainable Lawrence University Garden), a student-run nonprofit enterprise that uses sustainable agricultural methods to nurture a honeybee apiary, a fruit tree orchard, a vegetable garden and a hoop house, has been a fixture on the Lawrence campus for nearly two decades.

But the use of goats is a first.

Crubaugh went in search of goat rentals after successfully seeking monies through a Lawrence sustainability grant. The thistle and burdock weeds on the east end of the garden had gotten unmanageable, and the student volunteers couldn’t keep up, she said.

“I thought, what if we got some goats in here and they basically do the work for us, all while providing a lot of benefits for the garden, like fertilizer and digesting the seeds?” she said. “It was a really impossible project to take care of as humans, so we turned to goats.”

Lawrence senior Floreal Crubaugh holds one of the goats in the SLUG garden.
Floreal Crubaugh ’20 holds one of the goats in Lawrence’s SLUG garden. Crubaugh, the garden manager, brought in goats to help control troublesome weeds that have overgrown a portion of the student-run garden.

See more photos of the goats in the SLUG garden here.

More on sustainability efforts at Lawrence here.

Crubaugh, Anderson and LU officials first sought permission from the City of Appleton to allow for the goats. They were granted a special exemption for three weeks.

Anderson installed a temporary fence last Monday, then delivered the goats the following day.

“With the university always being progressive and thinking ahead, I think this is going to encourage the city and the county to take goats more seriously,” Anderson said. “Invasive plants are a widespread problem, whether it’s these weeds or buckthorn or whatever the issue is.”

It’s the first time he’s rented out the goats, something he wants to do more of in the future.

Anderson, who initially got the 10 goats this spring to help tackle a growing buckthorn problem on his family’s 30-plus acres in Waushara County, said he hopes to expand his goat herd and eventually connect with cities and counties to help control weed and invasive plant issues in parks and along hiking trails.

“They eat the seeds,” Anderson said of the goats. “That’s one of the biggest advantages of the goats is that they digest the seeds. The birds just spread it. But goats will actually digest it, so there’s no new growth.”

Steve Anderson, operator of Goat Busters, holds one of the goats in the SLUG garden.
Steve Anderson operates Goat Busters out of Mount Morris. He delivered 10 goats to the SLUG garden at Lawrence. They’ll remain in the garden through July 19.

Visitors are welcome to check out the goats and the work going on in the SLUG garden, located at the base of the hill just off of Lawe Street. Most of the goats are fairly shy. But a couple are outwardly social and are happy to greet visitors to the garden.

Crubaugh, who can be found tending the garden most days during the summer, hopes her work in SLUG will set the table for career opportunities in the sustainability field after she graduates.

“This is a good way to get a taste of that,” she said.

The senior from Bloomington, Illinois, had worked with goats while helping relatives who operate a cattle ranch in Montana. She saw the sustainability benefits first hand.

“I’d go out there during my summers as a kid and help bottle feed the orphan goats, and I’d watch the goats just move across the fields like a sundial, just mowing everything down,” she said. “That’s where this idea sort of originated for me.”

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

Three for three: France teaching assignments a sign of growth for Francophone program

Cosette Bardawil ’19 is one of three Lawrence students earning teaching assignments in France.

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

Three Lawrence seniors have been awarded competitive assistant teaching positions through TAPIF (Teaching Assistant Program in France), a program that gives American citizens the opportunity to teach English in public schools in France, as well as in other Francophone locations such as French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Martinique and Réunion.

This is Lawrence’s most successful year with TAPIF yet; the highest number of applicants and a 100 percent acceptance rate. This year’s recipients — Kendra L. Van Duine ’19, Christian Lee Messier ’18 and Cosette Bardawil ’19 — will spend seven months of the next academic year in France in an immersive teaching and learning experience.

Lawrence students have been awarded assistant teaching positions through TAPIF in the past, but this year’s success shows the strides that have been made in Francophone Studies.

“Maybe five years ago we had probably one or two (applicants) and now we’re having more people apply … and everybody’s getting in,” said Eilene Hoft-March, Milwaukee-Downer College and College Endowment Association Professor of Liberal Studies and French professor. “Not everybody we nominated (in the past) got in, and I can’t remember that we had three and four people applying at one time, and now we do.”

But the success is no surprise to Hoft-March because the quality of the applicant pool is now so good.

“I think our applicants have been very serious,” she said. “When you look at the three people who’ve won, they’re very good students, they’ve applied themselves, and it’s not surprising to me at all that they’ve been placed.”

Perhaps this year’s success will herald more applicants and awardees in the future. Hoft-March sees it as a sign of growing appreciation for the academic excellence at Lawrence.

“I think that Lawrence may have risen in terms of being recognized for the quality of students we have, and I think that’s a really good thing,” she said.

For more on the French and Francophone Studies program, click here.

And the recipients are . . .

Kendra L. Van Duine ’19

Kendra L. Van Duine ’19 will be teaching in Rouen, France. Linguistic and cultural immersion through TAPIF will be valuable experience toward her goal of becoming a foreign language interpreter, translating French, Spanish, and Chinese into English. This will be her first time traveling abroad alone, and for such a long period of time. But she’s looking ahead with eagerness.

“I am very excited to have this opportunity and hope it will help me gain confidence in myself by helping other students with their foreign language skills,” Van Duine said. “I’m looking forward to getting out on my own and exploring France and the neighboring countries, as well as exploring who I am as an individual.”

Van Duine is a double-major in French and Spanish. In addition to being an RLA in Small Exec and an on-campus events coordinator for the LU People for Animal Welfare (PAW) club, she works as a research assistant in the French and Francophone Studies department.

Christian Messier ’18

Christian Messier ’18 double majored in French and music. He will be teaching at the primary school level in Tours-Orléans. For three summers he has worked at Concordia Language Villages, an immersive language summer camp, and was a French tutor at Lawrence. While assistant teaching in France, he hopes to explore other languages and expand his teaching into the realm of music.

“I’m really looking forward to working with new language learners, and hopefully I’ll be able to also teach music lessons at nearby schools,” Messier said. “I’m planning on reading a lot and traveling to various cities in France, Germany, Spain, Portugal and Italy to work on developing my abilities in those respective languages.”

Cosette Bardawil ’19

Cosette Bardawil ’19 will teach at the Académie de Rennes. The French and flute performance major is a French tutor and a LARY Buddy. She plays in the orchestra and in chamber groups, and aims to pursue music and self-exploration along with sharpening her language skills.

“My hopes for this upcoming adventure are to improve my French, help students as much as possible, explore different ways of teaching, play in some music ensembles and discover more about myself, others, and France,” Bardawil said.

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Music, food and games enjoyed during annual LUaroo festival

Story to Awa Badiane ’21

LUaroo, a spring tradition at Lawrence University, was held over the Memorial Day weekend, providing two days of live music, food and games.

With a compilation of performances from both Lawrence students and off-campus artists on Saturday and Sunday, the annual music festival had something for everyone. It’s a welcome break as spring term comes to a close and students prepare for finals.

“It’s a nice time to just chill with friends and listen to music,” Jailene Rodriguez ’21 said as she enjoyed the music under sunny skies. 

Being one week before finals, LUaroo is the perfect way to make memories with friends and blow off some steam before it’s time to buckle down and study. 

“It also helps there’s a holiday right after; great way to prep for the last week of classes,” Rodriguez said.  

Photo gallery from LUaroo

Besides being an opportunity for students to enjoy great music, LUaroo is also an amazing opportunity for student-artists to showcase their talents on stage.  

With a stage set up on the quad lawn, music started at noon both days and proceeded into the night. The lineup included, among others, Awake for Birds, Jamil & the Litterbox Kids, Daniel Green, Lala Lala, Tobi Lou, Four Fists and Oshun.

Listen to select songs by some of the featured artists on our LUaroo 2019 Spotify playlist:

“I feel like it’s a great way for musical artists on campus to promote their talents. It gives them practice for performing at bigger festivals,” said Louric Rankine ’21.

This Lawrence tradition has become something all students can look forward to, knowing they are able to have fun, let go, and enjoy some great music right here on campus.  Food, Frisbee and volleyball added to the festive spirit.

We gathered a few photos from student photographers from this year’s festival.  

Awa Badiane ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.