Category: Press Releases

President’s Matriculation Convocation kicks off new year; circle these key dates

President Mark Burstein poses for a photo on the Lawrence campus.
President Mark Burstein will deliver the Matriculation Convocation at 11:10 a.m. Thursday.

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

Welcome to the 2019-20 academic year. As classes begin today, students are kicking off a journey filled with performances, events and activities, and amid all the fun, they must stay in control of exams and deadlines. We couldn’t include everything, but we chose some important dates you should remember — the indispensable Lawrence traditions and crucial academic deadlines — so you can make the most of this year at Lawrence.

Matriculation Convocation

Thursday, Sept. 19, 11:10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., Memorial Chapel

At the start of each academic year, the president welcomes the Lawrence community back to campus with the Matriculation Convocation. The speech lays the foundation for a collaborative, engaging year. This Thursday, President Mark Burstein will address students, faculty and members of the Appleton community with “Is Our Future Too Hot to Handle?” He’ll examine how human activities are impacting our natural environment and speak to how higher education institutions can better educate and inform on the topic. The convocation is open to the public. Admission is free.

Last day to make class changes

OK, this one has several dates to mark on the calendar. Fall Term: Friday, Sept. 20 | D-Term: Monday, Dec. 2 | Winter Term: Friday, Jan. 10 | Spring Term: Friday, April 3.

Some students miss their registration time or are waitlisted for a class. That’s what late class change deadlines are there for. When you get into that class you were waitlisted for, or you decide on the second day of the term that a course isn’t for you, your schedule is still in your hands. Remember, failing to finalize your schedule by these dates will earn you a late registration fee.

Involvement Fair

Friday, Sept. 20, 7-8 p.m., Somerset Room

Do you want to get involved on campus? This is the place to go. The Involvement Fair gives students the chance to explore more than 100 clubs and organizations at Lawrence, from the Baking and Cooking Club to the Society of Physics Students. Tour the booths and chat with club representatives to explore all of your extracurricular options. Who knows, you might find the group you stick with for the rest of your Lawrence journey.

“The Involvement Fair is a great way for student organizations to recruit new members and spread the word about their purpose,” says Assistant Director of Student Organizations Charity Rasmussen. “Or just have a great time welcoming new or returning students to campus.”

To learn about student organizations before the fair, visit the directory of student organizations.

Mid-term reading period and D-Term registration deadline

Thursday, Oct. 24 to Saturday, Oct. 27

This long weekend is designated for students to prepare for midterm exams. Some students use this free time to take a trip home; the winter and spring reading periods only last two days. In the meantime, maybe you’ve been considering a supplemental academic experience during your winter break. If so, in the midst of studying, don’t forget to register for D-Term. Lawrence’s optional two-week term runs Dec. 2-13. Registration can be completed on Voyager. Find information on D-Term and the course list here.

Convocation Series: “The Parallel Polis”

Thursday, Jan. 16, 11:10 a.m., Memorial Chapel

Russian-American journalist, author, translator and activist Masha Gessen will give a speech, “The Parallel Polis,” as part of the 2019-20 Convocation Series. These convocations are free and open to the community.

Cultural Expressions

Saturday, Feb. 29, Warch Campus Center

Cultural Expressions is an evening of performances in music, dance and poetry that showcase the talents of students of color on campus. This free event serves to celebrate and educate about cultures at the close of Black History Month. Cultural Expressions also punctuates the end of POC Empowerment Week (Feb. 23-29), highlighting the amazing contributions of people of color on our campus.

Cabaret

Saturday, April 11 and Sunday, April 12, Stansbury Theatre

Lawrence International presents Cabaret, an evening of impressive student talent and a whirlwind of cultures. Members of Lawrence’s diverse student body – approximately 13 percent of which are international students – take the stage and treat the audience to cultural performances with the goal of cultural education. This annual spring showcase has taken the stage for 43 years and counting.

Zoo Days

Saturday, May 16, Main Hall Green

By mid-May, the weather is warming up and the school year is winding down. In true Ormsby Hall spirit of tradition, members of the Ormsby community host this event to showcase activities from student organizations, Greek Life and other residence halls at booths and tables. Zoo Days is distinguished from other campus affairs by the classic carnival booths that are brought to Main Hall Green. Try your hand at the dunk tank and enjoy live music, snow cones, cotton candy and popcorn.

LUaroo

Saturday, May 23 and Sunday, May 24, Quad Green

Every Memorial Day weekend, students gather on the quad in the final days of Spring Term for Lawrence’s own student-run music festival. The lineup consists of student musicians and exciting headliners, with past performances from The Tallest Man on Earth and Empress Of. This always much-anticipated Lawrence tradition is one last hurrah before finals arrive.

Georgia Greenberg ’20, co-chair of the Band Booking Committee and co-director of LUaroo, says the festival strikes a special chord with students.

“(Students) should feel like they can take time to relax and celebrate how far they’ve come in the school year,” she says. “It’s usually about two weeks from finals, and while that can be a stressful time, Lawrentians like to set time aside to party with their friends and have an awesome and fun-filled weekend.”

Honors Convocation

Thursday, May 28, Memorial Chapel, 11:10 a.m.

The 2019-20 Convocation Series closes with the Honors Convocation, which highlights academic and extracurricular achievements of students. Amy Ongiri, the Jill Beck Director of Film Studies and Associate Professor of Film Studies, was selected for this year’s honor. Her speech is “The Importance of Failure.”

Final exams

Again, several dates to be aware of here. Fall: Sunday, Nov. 24 to Tuesday, Nov. 26 | D-Term: Friday, Dec. 13 | Winter: Monday, March 16 to Wednesday, March 18 | Spring: Monday, June 8 to Wednesday, June 10.

Final exams are perhaps the most important dates for a student to mark on the calendar. Know the dates well ahead of time so you can give yourself enough time to prepare and ace those tests. Professors give reminders as the exams approach, but they can still sneak up on you.

Commencement

Sunday, June 14, Main Hall Green

Residence halls close for underclassman three days prior, but the year’s festivities aren’t over yet. Graduating seniors stay on campus for Commencement, which signifies their move into life after Lawrence. It’s a time for family, friends and the future. There will be a number of events during the weekend for the graduates, culminating with Sunday’s Commencement.

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Grateful Grads Index highlights generosity, commitment of Lawrence alumni

A graduate stands and applauds during Lawrence's 2019 commencement ceremony in June.
Rain didn’t dampen the enthusiasm of Lawrence University graduates at the 2019 commencement ceremony. Lawrence alumni have a long history of staying connected to their alma mater.

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

The bonds between Lawrence University and its graduates are among the strongest and most enduring of any across the higher education landscape, according to a newly released report from Forbes magazine.

Lawrence landed at No. 26 on Forbes’ 2019 edition of the Grateful Graduates Index, which follows the money in terms of alumni giving at private, not-for-profit colleges. Lawrence is the only Wisconsin school to place in the top 70.

“When I meet with alumni and ask them why they give, two strong themes emerge,” said Cal Husmann, vice president for alumni and development. “The alumni reference the impact faculty members have had on their educations and lives — specifically, the strong relationships they’ve formed with faculty. Another theme is gratitude for the financial assistance they received as students and wanting to pay it forward.” 

Lawrence ranks high on U.S. News’ Best Value Schools list. Details here.

The Grateful Graduates Index takes a couple of factors into account — the seven-year median gifts per full-time enrolled student and the average percentage of alumni who give back, regardless of the amount.

“We boil down the analysis to a single factor,” Forbes says in its report. “Does your alma mater ‘spark joy’ in your heart, enough to cause you to reach into your wallet and show your gratitude in the form of a donation?”

This marks the seventh consecutive year Lawrence has made the Grateful Grads ranking. It has placed in the top 70 in each of those years, with this year’s No. 26 slot being the highest ranking yet.

From support of current and future students to partnerships with faculty and staff to enhancements of the university’s infrastructure, the generosity of alumni is critical to the ongoing financial health of any private college.

Lawrence has seen that generosity play out in multiple ways. The school’s recent 2018-19 fiscal report showed support topping $24.4 million, the fourth highest year to date.

The $220 million Be the Light! Campaign, which launched quietly in January 2014 and had its public launch in November 2018, has surpassed $184 million in gifts and pledges.

The Lawrence Fund, which plays a significant role in supporting the campus’s operation, from scholarships and study abroad opportunities to athletics and campus upkeep, is coming off a particularly strong year. Support reached $3.9 million in the last fiscal year, second only to the 2015-16 year. Without the fund, it’s estimated each student’s tuition would increase by more than $10,000 per year.

The Be the Light! Campaign includes the Lawrence Fund as one of its four cornerstones, along with the Full Speed to Full Need initiative to make Lawrence accessible and affordable to all academically qualifying students, the Student Journey, which has welcomed numerous endowed positions aimed at supporting cutting edge programs and course offerings, and Campus Renewal, targeting facility and infrastructure upgrade projects on campus.

Meanwhile, the recent $2.5 million gift from J. Thomas Hurvis ’60 to create an endowed professorship to teach the psychology of collaboration marked the latest in a string of endowed positions, supported by Lawrence alumni, that have boosted and diversified the school’s academic offerings.

Mike O’Connor is entering his first full academic year as Lawrence’s Riaz Waraich Dean of the Center for Career, Life, and Community Engagement (CLC), a recently endowed position that aims to better prepare students for life after Lawrence by, in part, enhancing connections with alumni in the students’ fields of interest.

The Forbes’ report comes one month before Lawrence’s sixth annual Giving Day, set for Oct. 10.

“Lawrence’s relationship with its alumni continues to be special,” Husmann said. “It’s a point of pride that those bonds don’t end when a student graduates. The ongoing support of current and future Lawrentians is critical, and our alumni rise to the occasion time after time.”

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu.

Academic quality, access to financial aid put Lawrence on ‘Best Value’ list

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

Lawrence University is ranked among the Best Value Schools in the country in a report released Monday by U.S. News & World Report.

Citing a combination of academic quality and the availability of need-based financial aid, the annual Best Value Schools rankings placed Lawrence at No. 37 among national liberal arts colleges.

Lawrence also placed in a tie at No. 58 for Best Liberal Arts Colleges and No. 60 for Best Undergraduate Teaching.

“Our focus at Lawrence has always been on providing an educational experience that doesn’t just push students, but lifts them,” said Ken Anselment, vice president for enrollment and communication. “And that means investing in the quality of our academic and co-curricular offerings as well as student financial aid.

“Being rated a Best Value is a welcome by-product of our focus on these priorities at Lawrence.”

To be considered for U.S. News’ Best Value Schools listing, a school first had to be ranked among the Best Colleges. Those qualifying schools were then examined on the basis of net cost of attendance for a student who received the average level of need-based financial aid.

“Only schools ranked in or near the top half of their categories are included because U.S. News considers the most significant values to be among colleges that are above average academically,” the U.S. News report stated. 

Lawrence’s Full Speed to Full Need (FSFN) fund, part of the overarching $220 million Be the Light! Campaign, is a key effort in the university’s commitment to make sure the doors are open to students of all socioeconomic backgrounds. The FSFN fund, which has surpassed $82 million to date, has already delivered direct financial aid assistance to 250 students, and another 100 incoming students are expected to benefit in the 2019-20 academic year.

The U.S. News rankings come on the heels of similar plaudits from The Princeton Review, which last month ranked Lawrence as the No. 4 Impact School in the country, included LU on its list of the best 385 colleges and hailed it as one of the 200 Best Value Schools.

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

These 4 Lawrence faculty members push physical limits with ultramarathons

Douglas Martin, Megan Pickett, Relena Del Toro Ribbons, and Jason Brozek pose on campus in their running gear.
Ultramarathoners on the Lawrence University campus include, from left, Douglas Martin, Megan Pickett, Relena Del Toro Ribbons, and Jason Brozek.

Story by Awa Badiane ’21

Whether it is for a worthwhile cause, to satisfy your competitive nature, or just to say you did it, running a full marathon is a remarkable achievement. But for a small collection of runners in this world, 26.2 miles is not enough. 

These ultramarathoners are a special breed — according to ultrarunning.com, only 0.0139% of the Wisconsin population partake in this sport.

And, yet, here on the Lawrence University campus, four faculty members count themselves among the state’s ultramarathoners. Relena Del Toro Ribbons, Jason Brozek, Megan Pickett, and Douglas Martin have all competed recently in ultramarathon races, some in the 31-mile range, others stretching as long as 100 miles. 

“26.2 is the marathon distance in miles, or 42.125 in kilometers; any distance over becomes an ultramarathon,” Ribbons said. “But the general consensus is around 50 kilometers, or 31 miles, is the entry-level ultramarathon distance. So, any person who runs that distance or walks it or hikes it is an ultramarathoner.” 

Ribbons, Brozek, and Martin all competed in 100-mile runs this summer, Ribbons and Brozek in Wisconsin, Martin in England.

Ribbons: “I love the solitude about it”

Ribbons, a 32-year-old geoscience and environmental studies professor, started running ultramarathons when she moved to Appleton in 2017. 

“To mark the fact that I was turning 30, I decided I wanted to run 30 miles, and 50K is just a little farther, so I might as well sign up for a race that was the day before my 30th birthday,” Ribbons said. 

What she expected to be a one-time milestone marker turned out to be something she really enjoyed. She was hooked. 

“I found once I got into trail running, I love the solitude about it,” she said. “It can be really social, or really great alone time. If I’m having a bad day, running will make me feel better, and a great day running will make my day feel awesome.” 

Since her first 50K, ultramarathon training has become a big part of Ribbons’ life. She runs at least one mile a day, no matter the circumstances, and averages 70 to 100 miles a week. 

She also happens to be really, really good at it. She placed in the top five in three ultramarathon races in 2018. 

Ribbons’ most recent long race was the Kettle Moraine 100 in June, a 100-mile trail run in east-central Wisconsin, with 65 of the miles coming on the Ice Age National Scenic Trail. It’s part of the Midwest Grand Slam of Ultra Running. 

“This year we had a torrential downpour,” Ribbons said. “Lightning and thunderstorms were rolling in while everyone was out running, the mud was really bad, and it was really humid in the build-up to that. It was kind of intense.” 

Despite all the adversities, Ribbons managed to complete her first 100-mile race in 27 hours, 4 minutes.

“I’d go from these really intense ‘this is amazing’ moments to ‘this is terrible, why did I sign up for this,’” she said. “’Who said this will be fun,’ and then someone else is like, ‘Nobody said this will be fun, you did this to yourself, remember?’ and I was like, ‘oh, right. I know it will be fun at some point,’ and you hang on until you get back to that high. … 

“I got to the last part with about a mile to go, and I was like, ‘Guys, do you think it’s OK to just sprint this in? I just want to feel like sprinting again.’ So, I zoomed in to the finish line, and it felt amazing. Then I sat down and I’m like, now I’m tired.”  

Brozek: “It was the farthest and longest I’d ever run”

Brozek, a 39-year-old professor of government, also ran in this year’s Kettle Moraine 100. He was among those getting a DNF (did not finish), but he’s not apologizing for that. He made it 77 miles, a new personal best. 

“This year, I think 50% of the starters dropped out of the Kettle 100,” Brozek said. 

He’s been participating in ultramarathons since 2014. 

“I did my first marathon with my wife the year after our second child was born,” Brozek said. “We ran that together in San Francisco. She decided, ‘Check, I got that off my list, I’m happy to do that.’ And then I signed up for a trail ultramarathon that next spring.” 

Since that first ultramarathon, Brozek has run in more than 20 ultramarathons, including June’s Kettle 100. 

“I dropped out of my most recent race, but I’m OK with it,” Brozek said. “It was the farthest and longest I’d ever run, and I’m happy with that.”

Brozek made it to mile 77, crushing his distance from the previous year of 62 miles. 

In the five years since his first ultramarathon, Brozek has become well known in the running community. He’s even become a running shoe product tester. 

“I don’t really wear out shoes,” he said. “Twice a year companies send me new shoes that are pre-release. Then I review them for Outside Magazine and a company called Gear Institute.” 

Douglas Martin, Megan Pickett, Relena Del Toro Ribbons, and Jason Brozek pose in their running gear on the Lawrence campus.
Douglas Martin, Megan Pickett, Relena Del Toro Ribbons, and Jason Brozek share a passion for running. They often train together.

Martin: “I truly love being out in nature”

Martin, a 44-year-old professor in the physics department, has been running ultramarathons since 2012.

“I have a running friend who, because he is not a very good friend, asked me to run with him to help him run a 100-mile race, to run with him the last 38 miles,” Martin said. “After thinking about it, I decided, I’ll do that with you.”  

Martin called that first ultramarathon a great experience.  

 “That first run of 38 miles, because it was the last 38 miles — (my friend) had already run 62 before that — it was delightful for me and it was terrible for him,” Martin said. “It was over night, we were moving smoothly, and I could talk with him, and there were a lot of check points where you would stop to get drinks, and there are volunteers to help you out, and I would talk with them. I had a great time.”  

Because Martin enjoyed that first ultramarathon so much, he decided to continue, upping his investment and the physical toll it would take. The running, of course, got more difficult.   

“When I started running the first 62 miles, it got much, much harder,” Martin said. “I always thought at the end of a race, ‘Wait, I want this to be more fun and less hard.’ So, that kept me trying, to ‘Let’s do another one, I’ll do another one.’”  

Martin has now run so many ultramarathons he said he’s lost track. 

“I don’t know, maybe two dozen, maybe three dozen,” he said.  

Aside from the pain of running such distances, there is joy to being on the trails.

“I truly love being out in nature,” Martin said. “It’s so much fun to run trails, to just go out and have a reason to be outside for five or eight hours every week.”  

Martin has spent the past year in London as a visiting professor at the Lawrence London Center. Being on another continent has not stopped him from running ultramarathons, with his most recent race being a 100-mile event in England this summer called the 1066 Run. The route, dubbed Harold’s Way, follows King Harold’s 1066 march from Westminster Abbey to Battle Abbey, where he and his army fought William the Conqueror.   

Martin said he plans to continue running ultramarathons, and has plans to run in the 50-mile North Face Endurance Challenge in Milwaukee the weekend before classes start.  

Pickett: “I wanted to do better and push myself” 

Pickett, a 53-year-old professor in the physics department, participated in her first ultramarathon a few years ago. Initially, she would run them as a relay with friends. 

It started when a friend saw information on the Apple Creek 50K near Appleton and suggested they run it as a relay team, Pickett said. 

“One person would do one of those eight-mile loops and then the other, so it would be half of (a full ultramarathon). And we’ve done something called Ragnar Races, which are 100-mile races broken up to a team of four or eight.” 

This year, however, Pickett and her friend decided to push themselves, signing up individually for the Apple Creek 50K race in April. 

“She wanted to sign up for this as a relay, but I said, ‘We’ve already done half of it, let’s do the full,’” Pickett said. “Worst thing is that I would regret it in the middle of the race. I’ve run half of the ultra already, so I wanted to do better and push myself.” 

 Pickett, who plans to run the Community First Fox Cities Marathon on Sept. 22, did indeed push herself, managing to finish her first ultramarathon in 7 hours, 31 minutes. 

“There’s a joy to crossing the finish line with someone who has never crossed that distance,” Pickett said. “For me, that was the longest distance I’ve ever run and the longest time I had been running. … You get emotional. We both ended up crying.” 

Awa Badiane is a student writer in the Communications office. 

Chimpanzee skeleton gets a much-needed makeover in LU student’s study project

For Claudia Rohr ’19, the chimpanzee project was an ideal supplement to a double major in biological anthropology and biology. The skeleton, seen over Rohr’s right shoulder, is on display in Briggs Hall. “It was a way to expand my work with primates,” she says.

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

Claudia Rohr ’19 remembers when Dan Proctor, a Lawrence University visiting assistant professor of anthropology, first wheeled an old chimpanzee skeleton into the forensic anthropology classroom.

A sophomore at the time, Rohr was struck by the skeleton’s appearance — the skull and torso hung limp from a hook and the limbs rested on a nearby table. There were missing pieces and backwards parts that made its purpose as a teaching tool difficult to fulfill.

Proctor said he was looking to have a student rearticulate and refurbish the skeleton. Make it useful again. Rohr was immediately interested.

With some help from the Mudd Library’s Makerspace and the physics department, Rohr spent much of the spring term rearticulating the skeleton as an independent study project.

“I thought it would be really cool if it could be put together well because Lawrence doesn’t have a lot of primate-related things,” she said.

The skeleton’s origins are unknown. For as long as anyone in the Anthropology Department can remember, it has hung on its stand on the third floor of Briggs Hall. It is believed that Lawrence student Richard H. Dorsey ’51 first articulated the skeleton in 1949, threading wire through small drilled holes in the bones to fasten them. But time and outdated articulation techniques eventually pushed the skeleton into disrepair.

To start her ambitious project, Rohr spent some late nights disassembling the skeleton, pulling wire apart from bone. She then took inventory of what bones she had and, with an osteology textbook at her side, deciphered which of the numerous tiny bones belonged to hands and which to feet. Eventually she was able to glue everything together and reattach the arms and legs to the torso.

But what to do about the missing bones? With training from Angela Vanden Elzen in the Makerspace, Rohr learned how to 3D print the missing bones using the existing parallel ones for reference. Most of these were finger bones. She quickly got the hang of it and printed with a resin so well matched to the skeleton’s original color that it’s difficult to tell the authentic bones from the fabricated ones.

With all the bones accounted for, the skeleton needed a new display configuration that would do justice to Rohr’s work and the chimpanzee itself. For this, Rohr reached out to LeRoy Frahm, the longtime electronics technician for the physics department. Frahm constructed a custom stand for the skeleton that would support its new knuckle-walking position.

The joint assist from anthropology, physics and the Makerspace carried Rohr’s project beyond an ordinary independent study.

“I thought it was really cool being able to work with everyone,” Rohr said of the collaboration. “LeRoy and Angela were really into it. It all worked together really well.”

Rohr graduated in the spring. From an academic perspective, the hands-on project turned out to be an excellent supplement to her double major in biological anthropology and biology.

“It was a way to expand my work with primates,” she said. “It was cool being able to see how the skeleton works as a whole and how different bones are articulated, rather than just looking at it for a day or two in class and then being tested on it.”

Rohr recently returned from her second research trip to Peru, where she studied the behaviors and disease ecology of New World monkeys.

Associate Professor of Anthropology Mark Jenike said the skeleton will be more useful than ever as a teaching tool in anthropology lab classes.

“People can look at it more easily now than they would’ve been able to when it was hanging from that hook,” he said. “It’s really for seeing what the whole skeleton together looks like, the way in which the chimpanzee would have been when it was alive.”

The value of Rohr’s project is far-reaching.

“It’s a form of respect to the skeleton,” Jenike said. “The chimpanzees are our closest living relative species. They have culture, they make tools, they seem to show emotions. … The chimp itself deserves respect. I think this is a more respectful way of displaying it than hanging from a hook with parts falling off.”

Rohr’s work is displayed in a hallway on the third floor of Briggs, visible to all who pass, including prospective students on campus tours. It stands as a testament to Lawrence’s commitment to academic excellence and the value of interdisciplinary teamwork.

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Lawrence unveils new B.M.A. degree, widening path for student musicians

The Lawrence University Jazz Ensemble performs at Memorial Chapel during the 2018-19 academic year.
The Lawrence University Jazz Ensemble has been part of the Lawrence Conservatory of Music’s long history of jazz education excellence. The new B.M.A. degree, beginning this fall, will build on that with its Jazz and Contemporary Improvisation track.

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

Electric guitars and synthesizers could soon become as familiar as violins and bassoons in the Lawrence Conservatory of Music.

A new degree program is being introduced at Lawrence University that is expected to open the school’s Conservatory of Music to a wider group of student musicians. Bachelor of Musical Arts (B.M.A.), with a Jazz and Contemporary Improvisation track, has been added to Lawrence’s degree options, joining Bachelor of Music (B.Mus.) and Bachelor of Arts (B.A.).

It’s a new avenue for a conservatory whose history dates back to the 19th century. Built on the strength of a nationally recognized jazz program that has been earning major honors since the 1970s, the new degree expands on the classical music component in the Conservatory, allowing students for the first time to audition with non-classical repertoire. The foundation is in jazz and contemporary improvisation, but the degree is built to accommodate a wide range of music making.

The B.M.A. degree, in place beginning this academic year, has a 50-50 split between music studies and a student’s choice of another field in the liberal arts landscape, with expectations to connect the two.

The high standards haven’t changed. The audition process for acceptance into the Conservatory remains intact, and the skill-development expectations continue to be top level. But for prospective students eyeing the B.M.A. degree, the audition no longer needs to be limited to pieces from the Western classical repertoire, potentially opening the door for students who see their strengths and interests in jazz or pop or hip-hop or another music genre. And the new degree presents an alternate path of study for classical musicians, as well.

It unwraps all sorts of additional choices, said Brian Pertl, dean of the Conservatory.

“The new degree will open the Conservatory to a broader range of musical interests,” he said. “No longer does a student have to audition on a Western classical instrument and perform classical repertoire. Drummers, electric guitarists, fiddlers, keyboard players, jazz vocalists, songwriters and contemporary composers are all welcome to audition into the new program.”

For more on the Lawrence Conservatory of Music, see here.

For details on the new B.M.A. degree, including an FAQ, see here.

This isn’t completely new territory for the Conservatory. It has long had a thriving jazz program. Lawrence won the first of its 28 Downbeat jazz education awards as far back as 1985, its latest as recently as April, picking up the award for the best undergraduate large ensemble for the second consecutive year. But current students have had to come into the jazz track via the classical music auditions and training, then seek a jazz emphasis while also studying classical repertoire.

The current B.Mus. degree, Pertl said, works well for many aspiring musicians who seek both classical and jazz training, but it leaves out those whose aspirations do not include the classical side of performance training. The new degree will rectify that. It also will expand the opportunities to tap into music-related fields that don’t necessarily involve performance.

Students perform as part of a Jazz Ensemble concert in Memorial Chapel.
Jazz and improvisation have long been part of the Lawrence Conservatory of Music. The new B.M.A. degree will add flexibility for music students.

Read more: Lawrence University Jazz Ensemble wins DownBeat Award for second consecutive year

Read more: Roomful of Teeth’s Estelí Gomez to join Lawrence Conservatory

The late Fred Sturm, who oversaw the jazz studies program at Lawrence for 26 years, began laying the groundwork for the new degree prior to his death in 2014.

What started as a specific focus on jazz eventually grew into the more wide-ranging B.M.A. degree, Pertl said. The degree allows the Conservatory to welcome in musicians who don’t necessarily fit a certain musical footprint.

“Last year, for example, we graduated an exceptional student from Chicago named Bernard Lilly,” Pertl said. “Bernard is an amazing soul singer. He’d been singing long before he came to Lawrence and sang all the way through Lawrence, but he never took any courses in the Conservatory because he didn’t feel like there was anything there for him, until his last term in his senior year when he took my entrepreneurship class and studied with (voice professor) John Holiday, and worked with professors in our jazz department. He would have been a perfect candidate for a B.M.A. degree.

“To be able to give students like Bernard high-level musical training will certainly broaden what they can do. But it also expands the musical culture of the Conservatory, mixing different genres and different musical sensibilities. This will be a huge advantage to everyone at the Conservatory.”

Students pursuing a B.Mus. degree in the Conservatory take about two-thirds of their classes in their major area of study and about one-third in general education or electives. Music students who pursue a double degree — a music degree and a B.A. in the college — do so on a five-year plan.

The new B.M.A., meanwhile, combines high-level music study with another field of interest in a four-year plan. As part of the degree requirements, students pursue a cognate focus that makes up 15% of their coursework. The cognate allows them to deeply explore another area of interest that ties into their music studies.

“It could be musically oriented but in the area of anthropology,” Provost and Dean of Faculty Catherine Kodat said. “Or musically oriented but in political science.”

Core classes, one-on-one work with faculty and a wide range of electives give B.M.A. students opportunities to carve their own musical paths, some performance based, some not.

That, said Patty Darling, director of the Lawrence University Jazz Ensemble, speaks to how music can inform so many disciplines in a variety of ways. Today, preparing young musicians to pursue their musical lives can’t be limited to focusing solely on technical mastery. Each year, opportunities will arise that don’t exist today, so musicians need to pair their high-level musicianship with high-level thinking, creative problem-solving, and the flexibility to capitalize on opportunities that others don’t even see.

Flexibility, an ability to adapt quickly, and a willingness to collaborate are all key attributes for anyone entering the world of music in the 21st century. Blending those core musicianship skills with an education in a student’s other field of interest is the next step in keeping the Conservatory forward-thinking.

“A lot of these students who come in wanting to create their own musical voice are pretty self-directed already,” Darling said. “While they’ll be gaining a lot of these core musicianship skills, they also want to be able to access entrepreneurial practices, music business models and opportunities for internships.

“It’s really interesting how the recording scene has developed, how music publishing has changed,” she said. “Even large ensembles and orchestras — all these musical opportunities have transformed dramatically in the last 10 years and students need the ability to self-promote. That’s a very important skill to have … to be able to put your best self out there.”

Pertl called the B.M.A. a natural progression for the Conservatory as it embraces and nurtures the modern musician.

“At Lawrence, we’ve already been incorporating so many of the elements of improvisation and world music into the trajectory of a classically trained musician for the same reason,” he said. “It’s going to be the flexibility of art, and of mind, that will help you to successfully create your musical life.”

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

Voices from abroad: LU students share takeaways from studying across the globe

Fallon Sellers drinks milk from a coconut while studying in Auckland, New Zealand.
Fallon Sellers ’20 enjoys fresh coconut milk while studying in Auckland, New Zealand.

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

It’s more than traveling the world; students who have enhanced their college experience with off-campus study often return with new perspectives and skills that stay with them for the rest of their lives.

Studying abroad last year made a lasting impression on Jackeline Flores ’19, who studied at the Lawrence University London Centre for her global studies major and Spanish minor.

“Personally, I feel that my experience abroad really solidified the idea that the world truly is my oyster,” she said. “All the knowledge and culture I was exposed to while abroad reminded me that there is so much out there left for me to learn about, which I find super exciting.”

Jackeline Flores takes in a view of the streets of London.
Jackeline Flores ’19 spent a term studying in London.

She’s not alone. We sampled more than a dozen Lawrence students who studied abroad during the past academic year, asking them to share key takeaways from their experience.

So many opportunities

The London Centre satellite campus is just one of 52 life-changing opportunities available to Lawrence students through the off-campus study program.

Each program blends classroom and experiential learning to facilitate students’ personal and academic growth through engagement with different cultures in an immersive learning environment. This leads to a range of profound benefits, says Director of Off-Campus Programs Laura Zuege.

“We know it affords the opportunities for intercultural learning, growth and development that employers time and time again are looking for,” she says. “Study abroad is a laboratory for that kind of development.”

Zuege and her colleagues work tirelessly to make these programs accessible and suitable for students of diverse academic, socioeconomic, social and ethnic backgrounds, by offering programs for every major and addressing students’ varied needs.

For more information on off-campus study, click here.

To see the full list of programs, click here.

“Different students have different concerns in different locations,” Zuege says. “We want to be tuned in with some of our portfolio (program) choices but also with how we approach, prepare and recruit students to be sure we’re reaching a range of the student body that’s representative of our student body.”

This fall, a breakthrough financial aid policy change is making that possible. All of a student’s institutional financial aid — grants, federal loans, scholarships — can now be contributed to off-campus study, in addition to existing study abroad scholarships. In the past, 100 to 120 students went abroad each year; this fall there will be 145.

What they’re saying

Here are a dozen more Lawrence students whose lives changed thanks to off-campus study last year:

Tamima Tabishat poses for a photo overlooking Rabat, Morocco.
Tamima Tabishat ’20 takes in a view overlooking Rabat, Morocco.

Tamima Tabishat ’20, AMIDEAST, area and Arabic language studies in Rabat, Morocco; global studies/German language studies and French language studies: “The most important (impact) was the way it helped me learn how to adapt quickly and smoothly to a new environment. Morocco’s geographic, linguistic, religious, political and cultural elements are very different from my typical academic environment. By studying in a new context, I felt that I was able to adopt new habits, adapt to new customs, and abide by new social rules, all of which are incredibly important skills to have in life. Practicing these things every day taught me how to see everything from a totally new perspective, which has made me not only a more critical thinker, but also a more considerate and tolerant citizen of the world.”

Joe Hedin ’19, Lawrence University London Centre, government/Spanish: “The London Centre allowed me to prepare myself for life after Lawrence. Thanks to the London Centre and Off-Campus programs staff, I had an internship, so I learned how to work in traditional offices, along with learning how to commute to work. I will never be able to put into words how impactful this was.”

Abigail Keefe ’20, IES Paris, language and area studies; violin performance, and mathematics/French and music theory: “Living in France with my host family helped me to improve my skills in the French language way beyond what I ever thought I would be capable of. Living in a country where my native language was not the primary language also helped me to try to understand how it would feel for people living and working in America for whom English is not their native language.”

Ryan Leonard sits in the sand in front of Mount Maunganui.
Ryan Leonard ’19 poses for a photo in Tauranga in front of Mount Maunganui.

Ryan Leonard ’19, IES Auckland, New Zealand, geology: “This experience is going to be one of the biggest selling points in my life after college. From the challenge of moving to a new country alone and having to meet new people, to maintaining good grades and budgeting and making time for travel, I have gained many marketable skills that I may not even realize I have acquired.”

Julia Johnson ’20, IES Vienna, music, cello performance; psychology/pedagogy: “It pushed my boundaries in so many ways such as speaking another language, making friends, being comfortable with public transportation, making travel plans, and not being afraid to explore Vienna and go to performances on my own. I feel like I grew more as a person studying in a new city where they speak another language more than I ever would have on my own campus.”

Ethren Lindsay ’20, Japan; linguistics and Japanese: “I was able to take many classes that would not have been available at my home university, one of which was a translation job. Since I am planning on possibly going into translation as a part of my future work, this was quite literally the most valuable thing that I could have gotten out of college.”

Alice Luo poses for a photo in an urban garden in Berlin.
Alice Luo ’19 visits an urban garden in Berlin.

Alice Luo (Manxin) ’19, IES Berlin, language and area studies; history: “Berlin is such a dynamic city with people coming from all over the world. In America, I felt an urge to be more American and I tried to deny my Chinese identity to some extent in order to better merge into the American culture. In Berlin, with the diverse population and cultures and a seemingly freer atmosphere, which I personally felt, I learned to accept my identity and even celebrate it and appreciate it.”

Juan Marin ’20, IES Freiburg, language and area studies; film studies and German: “I feel like the program taught me how to understand people better. I met a lot of people abroad, and I don’t just mean my classmates and more Americans. I met people from Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Greece, Russia, Bolivia, France, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, Australia, Germany (of course), Morocco, the UK, and more. The program gave me an even higher appreciation for diversity and inclusion.”

Kate Martensis ’20, Budapest, semesters in mathematics education; math and history: “As part of our practicum course, my fellow students and I each had to teach two classes at a local high school. Though the process was not without its difficulties, it was an incredibly valuable experience, and I was so glad to put all the things we’d learned from school visits and our classes into practice. This made me all the more excited to be a teacher.”

Tia Colbert looks up at a wax figure of Sherlock Holmes at the Sherlock Holmes Museum in London.
Tia Colbert ’20 checks out a wax figure of Sherlock Holmes while visiting the Sherlock Holmes Museum in London with her British Crime Fiction class.

Tia Colbert ’20, Lawrence University London Centre, English and Greek/creative writing: “There was a significant focus on using London itself as a textbook, and I feel like that enhanced all the classes. I believe that experiential learning is one of the best ways to engage students, and the London Centre Program definitely delivered in that respect.”

Harry Rivas ’19, ACM Shanghai, economics: “The program had a drastic impact on my life. It changed the way I saw the rest of the world, specifically how I saw China, the impact China has already had on the world, and what is to come. I got to explore a culture and mindset so different from my own.”

Fallon Sellers ’20, IES Auckland, New Zealand, government/international relations: “It was incredibly interesting to interact and work with others my age from a different social and academic culture than mine. Collaborating with them and learning their stances on business and ethical behavior was fascinating, and it was immensely rewarding to observe other points of view outside of the U.S.”

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Princeton Review cites Lawrence as one of ‘Best’ colleges in the country

Students pose for a selfie before the 2019 commencement ceremony at Lawrence.
Lawrence University students hailed the school as supportive, inclusive, and empowering in a survey from The Princeton Review. Lawrence ranked as one of the 385 best four-year colleges in the U.S.

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

Lawrence University continues to feel the love from The Princeton Review.

After being named the No. 4 Impact School in the country on a Princeton Review ranking earlier this year, Lawrence has made the education service company’s list of the best 385 colleges in the country — only about 13% of eligible four-year colleges make the “Best” book.

“The Best 385 Colleges,” published each August, has been an annual resource for prospective students since its debut in 1992. The book does not rank the schools within the list of 385, but it does include a series of Top 20 lists in a variety of sub categories. The lists come after data is gathered from school administrators and interviews are done with students from each of the schools.

See “The Best 385 Colleges” report here.

Earlier this year, Lawrence was hailed by The Princeton Review as one of 200 “Best Value Schools” in the United States. That book placed Lawrence at No. 4 in the category of best schools for Making an Impact, which focused on life on campus but also post-college work.

“The college ranking field is full of many flowers,” notes Ken Anselment, dean of admissions at Lawrence. “But one of our favorites is being shortlisted as one of the Princeton Review’s Impact Schools because it underscores the quality of life our graduates enjoy after Lawrence. It affirms that our mission of providing a transformative education is, indeed, having an impact.”

Here’s a quick guide to Lawrence’s evaluation in the most recent book:

What students are saying about academics: “Tutoring is readily available, and the school ‘places an incredible focus on mental health issues and counseling.’ Lawrence is especially good at ‘providing a creative and explorative atmosphere within the college,’ and structuring itself in a manner that allows for student flexibility, so students ‘are able to explore and study whatever we are interested in, and we are encouraged to do so.’”

What students are saying about life at Lawrence: “Many people take advantage of the school’s offered activities like dances, comedians, musicians, speakers who are brought to campus, and movies shown in the cinema, and every term has a big event, such as the Fall Festival, Trivia, Winter Carnival, Cabaret and LUaroo. … As the university houses a popular music conservatory, ‘there is ALWAYS a type of concert going on.’”

What students are saying about their classmates: “Students here ‘are not afraid to show who they really are’ and ‘truly just love expressing how every person is their own and that we all accept it.’”

What the Princeton Review editors are saying: “Lawrence University takes a holistic approach to the admissions game. The school does its best to look beyond numbers and get a full sense of each applicant.”

In addition to the Princeton Review rankings, Lawrence also was honored earlier this year by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs for being among the top-producing institutions for the Fulbright Program, the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange program. With five recent graduates teaching abroad on Fulbright awards, Lawrence landed on the prestigious list of U.S. colleges and universities that produced the most Fulbright students during the past academic year.

The 2018-19 list that features Lawrence  was published in The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information for Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

Signage a nod to strange, complicated history of Lawrence’s favorite rock

New signage has gone up next to the Rock on Lawrence’s Main Hall lawn, noting the big boulder’s ties to campus dating back to 1895.

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

The Rock, a 2-ton boulder resting peacefully on a stretch of lawn near the northwest corner of Main Hall, has finally had its long, strange history commemorated by Lawrence University.

Newly installed signage provides a nod to the 4,700-pound piece of granite that has been tolerated but rarely celebrated by the university that has been its home — mostly — since members of the Class of 1895 first hauled it to campus 124 years ago.

As campus traditions go, this is one that has had a bit of a love-hate relationship with the school. The Rock — not to be confused with a certain Hollywood celebrity of the same nickname — has been the subject of pranks, fraternity feuds and deep mysteries through the decades. It was returned to campus in the spring of 2018 after having gone missing for 20 years.

Now it’s home, and there’s nothing but love. Thus, the new signage recently placed next to the Rock:

“Members of the Class of 1895 found this boulder on a geology field trip in New London, WI, and brought it to campus to serve as the senior class gift. In the years since, the Rock has been painted, buried, moved around, and even removed from campus. After a 20-year stay on the Nickel family farm (Michael Nickel ’02, Adam Nickel ’03), it was returned to its original placement in front of Main Hall in spring 2018.”

The Rock, now painted green with the white lettering of the Class of 2019, has a history that started out combative, if all in good fun. Consider this dispatch in The Lawrentian in July 1895:

“Tuesday afternoon was Class Day and the big boulder of the Class of ’95 made its debut in college history. Somehow the seniors had an idea that the giddy juniors would not allow it to become a landmark on the campus and they watched all night till the day of its dedication, lest some festive ’96er should come along and carry the pebble off and throw it in the river.”

That would set a tone that would become part of the Rock’s tradition, one of mostly harmless rivalry and midnight escapades stretching across more than 100 years, frequently chronicled by The Lawrentian and sometimes The Post-Crescent.

Among the highlights:

With concerns the pranks had gotten out of hand, the Rock was moved to a mostly out-of-the-way spot near the Fox River in 1939; it would be returned to the Main Hall green by ambitious students three years later.

It would go missing in 1964, finally retrieved in 1983 (it had been buried behind Plantz Hall by members of the Class of 1967, so, technically, it was still on campus).

And it would once again disappear in 1998, discovered 20 years later by students Sarah Axtell ’17 and Jon Hanrahan ’16, who had launched an entertaining, Serial-style podcast in hopes of solving the mystery of the Rock’s whereabouts.

In between all of that, the Rock was at the center of some much-chronicled campus rivalries and shenanigans that included students hiring towing companies to move the rock around campus in the dark of night, tossing it into the Fox River on multiple occasions, placing it in cement, and building a papier-mache replica that would appear one morning in 1957 on the roof of the former Stephenson Hall.

As the location of the Rock became a competition among fraternities, there was an unwritten rule that said wherever the rock was located on the morning of homecoming, that is where it would stay for the rest of the school year.

The 1998 disappearance came not long after the Phi Delta Theta and Delta Tau Delta fraternities had a bit of a public showdown, one that involved a front-end loader and required the dean of students to negotiate a compromise as local media looked on.

The engraving of Class of '95 can clearly be seen on the Rock, which sits on the Main Hall lawn. The rock is painted green with Class of 2019 in white.
A paint job by the Class of 2019 does not obscure the engraving from the Class of ’95 (that’s 1895) on the Rock, which sits on the Main Hall lawn with newly installed signage commemorating its history.

A search and a podcast

The Rock was then mostly forgotten for nearly two decades until Axtell and Hanrahan launched their No Stone Unturned podcast in 2016.

“Sarah and I were real dorks about Lawrence history,” Hanrahan said.

Their sleuthing eventually took them to a farm in Calumet County where the rock was found behind an old barn, the carved Class of ’95 in plain sight. It turns out there were a lot of complicated emotions tied to the Rock and how it ended up on that farm.

Lawrence and the Nickel family would eventually reach agreement that the Rock should return to the Main Hall green. It came home in 2018.

The ongoing fascination with the big boulder speaks to college students’ need to feel connected to their school’s history, said Hanrahan, who now works as an associate producer for New York Public Radio. He points to other schools with similar objects that have served as traditions that tie together generations of students — Rutgers’ cannon, Carnegie Mellon’s fence painting, and Northwestern’s own version of an oft-painted rock.

“There’s definitely that element of college students wanting and needing that quirky sense of identity,” Hanrahan said.

The podcast not only gave Hanrahan and Axtell the chance to fixate on Lawrence history — “This project was one of the first real moments when I fell in love with archives,” Hanrahan said — it also provided an opportunity to connect with alumni in a meaningful way.

“We got a sense of what life was like at Lawrence, especially in the ’90s, which was when the disappearance occurred,” Hanrahan said. “… We got a taste of life in the ’60s when the Rock disappeared then. That was very, very different from what life was like in the ’90s, which was also very different from what life is like in the 2010s.”   

An uneasy history

Erin Dix ’08, the university’s archivist over the past nine years, said the many Rock-related pranks left some past university administrators uneasy. That’s why the new signage is notable.

“The administration at Lawrence has not always embraced the disruptive elements of the Rock’s tradition,” she said. “In 1939, college officials moved the Rock to the tennis courts at the bottom of the Drew Street hill to try to discourage the constant pranks. But students managed to hoist it back up the hill three years later. During the Rock’s most recent absence, I often heard the theory that the administration had purposefully removed it from campus.” (It had not.)

“My favorite anecdote about the Rock comes from a Post-Crescent article published when it was being exhumed from the parking lot behind Plantz Hall in 1983,” Dix said. “‘Richard Warch, president of the university, was there, eating a peanut butter and jelly sandwich from his sack lunch during the noon-hour event. “What a great day for Lawrence University,” he said with mock enthusiasm as a big P.G. Miron crane lifted the rock from the ground.’”

Hanrahan believes that kind of history should be celebrated. Students today should be aware of the school’s deep history and the student experiences that preceded them, even if it’s just a goofy old rock. That it has Class of ’95 carved into it is reason enough to acknowledge that connection, he said.

“That’s not 1995, that’s 1895, this unimaginably distant group of people,” Hanrahan said. “And it has these classes from the 1930s carved on the side as well. So, it’s a rock and it’s obviously this old geological artifact, but it broadcasts its oldness and it’s Lawrenceness right there on the side. It’s hard to look at it and not think of a Lawrence from 100 years ago.”

New signage now accompanies the Rock on the Main Hall lawn.

Axtell, now working in New York City for Accomplice the Show, an immersive theater company, applauds the university for formally recognizing the history of the Rock, calling it an important connection between generations of students.

“I don’t think the university can always take an official stance on some of the goofy things that have happened in the past, but I think the university should be proud of the ingenuity and creativity of its students,” she said.

“It gives people a reason to connect back to the history of the place. People need to pay more attention to the history of the areas around them, for better or worse.”

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

From Houdini to Ferber, 6 things you should know about Appleton

Photo of the signage in Houdini Plaza.
Houdini Plaza, named for Harry Houdini, is at the center of Appleton’s downtown.

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

Like any city, Appleton has its own claims to fame, whether it’s an actor from here who made it big or an innovation in technology that has its roots here in this community. 

For incoming Lawrence students trying to get the lay of the land when it comes to a new home, here are six curious tidbits about Appleton history that may surprise you.

Appleton was the childhood home of Harry Houdini

This amazes a lot of people, but there’s no trick to it. Houdini, or Erik Weisz, was born in Budapest in 1874. His family settled in Appleton in 1878, where they lived for four years until his father lost his job and they moved to Milwaukee. Despite the move, Houdini considered Appleton to be his boyhood home. Houdini Plaza, the community space in the center of downtown, is named for the famed escape artist. The History Museum at the Castle, just down the street, has an extensive Houdini exhibit. There’s a Houdini Elementary School in town. You can eat at the Houdini’s Escape Gastropub, and each fall you can run in the Houdini 10K race. So, yea, Houdini is here.

Willem Dafoe got his start in Appleton

You might recognize Willem Dafoe from Platoon (1986), Spider-Man (2002) and The Florida Project (2017). Did you know the four-time Academy Award nominee was born in Appleton in 1955? He was William then. Early in his teenage years, he began acting in Appleton’s Attic Theatre. He was Billy then. When he was kicked out of Appleton East High School (that’s another story) he fulfilled his graduation requirements by taking a class at Lawrence.

Appleton is the home of the oldest coeducational college in Wisconsin

Here’s some history that involves Lawrence. Did you know Appleton has been making strides in gender equality since the time of its founding? Lawrence University was chartered in 1847 and has admitted women since the first day of classes on Nov. 12, 1849, making it the oldest coed college in Wisconsin.

Sen. Joe McCarthy grew up in the Appleton area

Here’s a refresher from history class: Sen. Joseph McCarthy achieved notoriety in the 1950s when he accused members of the U.S. government (and others) of communist activity, contributing to the collective panic that marked the Cold War era. Before that, the senator was Joe from Appleton. Well, Grand Chute, actually. He was at one time the manager at an Appleton grocery store. He later earned his law degree at Marquette University, was elected to a circuit court judgeship and eventually was elected to the Senate, all before becoming one of the most reviled politicians in U.S. history. He is buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery in Appleton.

Appleton had the first hydroelectric power station

In 1882, Appleton paper manufacturer H.F. Rogers needed a source to power his paper plant. Inspired by Thomas Edison’s designs for a steam power station in New York, Rogers commissioned the first hydroelectric power station to be built. It came to fruition along the Fox River, generating enough power to run his plant, his home, and a nearby building. The Hearthstone House Museum in Appleton is now open to the public, marking that historic contribution to the modern power grid.

Appleton gave us author Edna Ferber

The Pulitzer Prize winner was born in Kalamazoo, Michigan in 1885, moving with her family to Appleton when she was 12. She started her writing career here in Appleton, working as a reporter for the Appleton Daily Crescent at age 17. She nurtured her love of writing and reporting, leading her to eventually write iconic novels such as So Big (1924) and Showboat (1926). She’s often mentioned among the greatest novelists of her generation.

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.