Category: Press Releases

Lawrence commits to educate more high-achieving, low-income students

Lawrence University has announced ambitious new plans aimed at attracting and supporting high achieving, low- and moderate-income students as a member of the American Talent Initiative (ATI).

President Mark Burstein
President Mark Burstein

Lawrence was among the first colleges to join the ATI, a Bloomberg Philanthropies initiative led by the Aspen Institute’s College Excellence Program and Ithaka S+R.

Each participating institution is working toward the overall ATI goal of enrolling 50,000 additional talented, low- and moderate-income students by the year 2025 at colleges and universities with strong graduation rates.

“The American Talent Initiative reinforces Lawrence’s long-standing commitment to improve access for high-achieving students from families with limited means,” said Lawrence President Mark Burstein. “However, access is only a first step. Through this initiative, Lawrence will strengthen its efforts to support these students to assure that they thrive and persist to graduation.”

ATI, which has grown its membership to 86 colleges and universities in less than a year, works with institutions across the country that graduate at least 70 percent of their students in six years. Lawrence was among ATI’s initial 60 top schools, which includes Bates College, Franklin & Marshall College, Pomona College, Stanford University and Yale University. ATI recently announced 18 additional prestigious colleges have jointed the program, among them Northwestern University, Bowdoin College and Case Western Reserve University.

Lawrence has developed action plans aimed at supporting these students socially, academically and financially, from before they arrive on campus to graduation and beyond.A graduation mortar board with the message Don't let your dreams be dreams

Lawrence’s goal is to improve socioeconomic diversity through a number of strategies expected to drive enrollment among high-achieving, lower income students, including:

Identifying talented students through better recruitment of qualified high school graduates and high-achieving transfer students from community colleges and other schools

Reaching out directly to the neediest families nationwide to increase the number of Pell Grant-eligible students enrolled, the number of applications from Pell Grant-eligible students, and the number of first-generation students enrolled

Removing cost as a barrier to access by increasing need-based aid to make attendance more affordable

Retaining and graduating lower-income students at rates comparable to their higher-income peers

As part of its commitment, each member institution works with ATI to develop action plans to recruit more students from economically diverse backgrounds, ensure that admitted lower-income students enroll and engage in campus life, prioritize need-based financial aid and minimize gaps in progression and graduation rates between students of differing socio-economic backgrounds.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Happy (headache-free) holidays: Lawrence psychologist offers tips to avoid the post-celebration hangover

With two of the country’s biggest holidays of the year — Christmas and New Year’s — on the horizon, the one thing no one wants to toast this holiday season is the dreaded hangover.

Psychology professor Bruce Hetzler
Bruce Hetzler

As people ready corks to pop and glasses to clink, Lawrence University psychology professor Bruce Hetzler, who also teaches in the neuroscience program, shares some insights on the holiday hangover: how to avoid it, what causes them and how to treat it if you have one.

A member of the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism, Hetzler teaches psychopharmacology at Lawrence, a course that deals with the effects of drugs on behavior. His research has led to the publication of nearly a dozen scientific papers that examine the effects of alcohol on rats.

“Rats are not simply little people. They are different,” he said, “but, they do metabolize alcohol in the same way as humans. There has been very little scientific research conducted on hangovers. Even though they are very prevalent, research is lacking.”

Throwing cold water on most party plans, Hetzler says there is one sure-fire way to avoid a hangover: don’t drink alcohol.

While alcohol abstinence is the only guaranteed way to make it through the holidays without the headache and nausea frequently associated with hangovers, there are ways to at least minimize the odds of getting one.

“Developing a hangover depends on a number of things, including the type of alcoholic beverage consumed, the amount consumed and the duration of drinking,” Hetzler explained. “You’re least likely to develop a hangover if you drink compounds that consist mainly of just alcohol like gin and vodka. Consuming alcoholic beverages like red wine, bourbon or whiskey are more likely to lead to a hangover.”

Darker-colored alcohols contain more “congeners” — compounds that are either added or byproducts of the manufacturing process that contribute to the color, taste and smell of the beverage. While the amount of alcohol consumed is a major factor in having a hangover, the hangover is actually produced when the blood alcohol level falls. It reaches its maximum level when the blood alcohol level is zero.

The popular, but unproven, “hair of the dog” cure is one Hetzler doesn’t recommend.

“You don’t want to drink again when your blood alcohol is zero. It will mitigate the hangover, but it can produce other problems and you’ll get a hangover again when that alcohol wears off.”

Imbibing on spirits aside, Hetzler says one’s personality can also be a factor for hangovers. While no one has been able to determine why, if someone is more defensive or feels guilty about drinking, they are more likely to develop a hangover while a happy, positive person is less likely.

“But that doesn’t mean the positive person still won’t develop one,” he added with a smile.

Genetics can also play a role. Someone with a family history of alcoholism is more prone to developing a hangover.Glasses and wine bottles on a bar

Beyond the typical ailments associated with hangovers, starting with a severe headache and vomiting, Hetzler says sluggishness, vertigo, heightened sensitivity to noise and light and personality changes are common symptoms. More seriously, because of the way alcohol affects the brain, one’s sympathetic nervous system ramps up, producing an increase in heart rate and blood pressure.

While prevention is the best approach, should moderation fail, Hetzler says there are things that can help mitigate, but alas, there are no known “cures” for a hangover.

“It helps to eat before you drink,” said Hetzler, who dealt with his own one and only hangover as a college freshman. “Food helps absorb the alcohol. Drink water to replenish lost fluid since alcohol causes dehydration. For the headache, take aspirin or ibuprofen but not acetaminophen, the active component in Tylenol. Acetaminophen can damage the liver and alcohol can damage the liver and the two in combination can really cause damage.”

Hetzler cautions against relying on products marketed as hangover cures.

“People should be leery of anything touted as a cure or treatment that they might find over the counter at gas stations, grocery stores or even pharmacies. The Dietary Supplement Health Education Act of 1994 severely restricts the Food and Drug Administration’s ability to exert control over dietary supplements and herbal products or vitamins. You can find things touted as a treatment for a hangover, but you don’t know if it’s safe, you don’t know if it is effective, because the FDA has not evaluated it.”

Since it can take as long as two days to fully shake the effects of a hangover, Hetzler says the best course of action is to simply practice patience.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Academy of Music Girl Choir focuses on concept of listening

The concept of learning to listen with ear, eye, mind and heart as a lens will be explored in a pair of performances by the Lawrence Academy of Music’s Girl Choir during its annual fall concert.Chinese character "Ting"

The concert, entitled “Ting,” which is the Chinese character for “listen,” will be performed Saturday, Dec. 9 with performances at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel.

Tickets, at $12 for adults, $8 for seniors/students, are available online or at the Lawrence Box Office the day of the concert from 12:30 p.m. – 4 p.m. and one hour prior to the evening performance. 920-832-6749.

“Given the deep social divide into which our current singers are coming of age, I felt strongly that a focus on learning to listen—‘in music and in life,’ as we say—would be an asset to them well beyond our rehearsal walls,” said Karen Bruno, director of the Academy of Music, who employed various aspects of the concept of listening into the repertoire and rehearsal process this fall.

Girl Choir singers performingThe concert will feature more than 300 singers in grades 3-12 from all over the Fox Valley performing a wide range of music by significant composers, including Mozart, Bach, Benjamin Britten, Antonín Dvorák and Ralph Vaughan Williams, among others, as well as Brazilian and Norwegian folk songs.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence supports court challenge to DACA program rescission

Lawrence University has joined 49 other colleges and universities in signing an amicus curiae — friend-of-the-court — brief supporting a legal challenge to the proposed end of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

The universities signed the brief as part of a civil action which the University of California is pursuing in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, San Francisco Division.

President Mark Burstein
President Burstein

Lawrence is the only Wisconsin institution to join this brief. Similar briefs have been signed and filed by Ivy League colleges and higher education institutions with religious affiliations.

The California lawsuit challenges a Sept. 5 order rescinding the five-year-old policy that protects young undocumented immigrants from deportation. Congress was given a six-month window to pass a replacement law before DACA protections are eliminated.

Officials estimate approximately 800,000 young adults brought to the United States as children by their parents qualify for the program, giving them the right to work legally and remain in the country without fear of deportation.

“Ensuring Lawrence remains open to students from all backgrounds who display academic excellence is a core value of this university,” said Lawrence President Mark Burstein.  “DACA has provided a valuable avenue for talented students to pursue a college education and meaningful work.”

According to the brief, ending DACA will harm campuses and some of the best and brightest students across the country. It could deprive institutions of highly skilled and trained faculty and staff. It could force students to suspend their studies mid-way through their educational journey, leaving them with no degree to show for their efforts.

Perhaps most importantly, even for schools without DACA students, supporting DACA is central to the institution’s core mission of providing an education to help people realize their ambitions and potential and contribute to the community, the country and the world.

The brief states, “The rescission of DACA devalues that mission without any rational basis. In that respect, it harms all amici (those 50 institutions of higher education who signed the brief).

Students walking across campusThe brief concludes by noting “DACA is an enlightened and humane policy and it represents the very best of America. It provides legal certainty for a generation of high-achieving young people who love this country and were raised here. Once at college or university, DACA recipients are among the most engaged both academically and otherwise. They work hard in the classroom and become deeply engaged in extracurricular activities.

“Moreover, DACA students are deeply committed to giving back to their communities and more broadly, the country they love. These are not the types of individuals we should be pushing out of the country or returning to a life in the shadows. As institutions of higher education, we see every day the achievement and potential of these young people and we think it imperative that they be allowed to remain here and live out their dreams.”

The brief reflects the interests of institutions across the spectrum of higher education, including large public research universities, small private liberal arts colleges and two-year community colleges. Additionally, more than 800 college and university presidents have signed a letter to Congress urging them to take action to protect Dreamers.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Cultural competency series presentation examines microaggressions

 Self-affirming and empowering strategies for individuals who have been targets of bias will be the focus of the latest presentation in Lawrence University’s cultural competency series.

Head shot of Lawrence vice president for diversity and inclusion Kimberly Barrett
Kimberly Barrett

Kimberly Barrett, vice President for diversity and inclusion and associate dean of the faculty at Lawrence and Elizabeth De Stasio, Raymond H. Herzog Professor of Science and professor of biology, will co-lead the interactive program “Powerful Ways to Respond to Microaggressions, Stereotypes & Isms” Thursday, Nov. 16 at 11:30 a.m. in the Warch Campus Center. The event is free and open to the public, but advance registration would be appreciated at div-inclusion@lawrence.edu.

Beth De Stasio

The program will include social science research to inform participants’ understanding of concepts related to microaggressions and stereotypes. De Stasio, who, with department colleagues and students, co-founded LEDS — Lawrentians Enhancing Diversity in the Sciences — will incorporate stories of microaggressions students have experienced in the natural and social sciences in a series of role-playing exercises as part of the program.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Hitting the right note: Five students earn first-place honors at state singing competition

Five Lawrence University students earned first-place honors at the annual Wisconsin chapter of the National Association of Teachers and Singing (NATS) competition held Nov. 2-4 at UW-Stevens Point.

Nick Fahrenkrug
Nick Fahrenkrug

Nick Fahrenkrug, a sophomore from Davenport, Iowa, won his second straight NATS title, capturing the men’s second-year college classical division. In the finals, he sang “Crucifixion” by Samuel Barber, “Chanson a Boire” by Maurice Ravel and “Lieben, Hassen, Hoffen, Zagen” by Richard Strauss.

Emily Austin
Emily Austin

Emily Austin, a sophomore from Washington, D.C., won the women’s second-year college classical division. She performed “La Maja Dolorosa 1” by Enrique Granados, “Spring and Fall” by Ned Rorem and “Notre Amour” by Gabriel Faure in the finals.

Martha Hellerman
Martha Hellerman

Martha Hellermann, a senior from Shorewood, won the women’s fourth-year college classical division after singing “Frère voyez!…Du gai soleil” by Jules Massenet and “En Sourdine” by Gabriel Faurè in the finals.

Reever Julian
Reever Julian

Reever Julian, a freshman from Chicago, Ill., won the men’s first-year college classical division. He sang “In Diesen Heil’gen Hallen” by Mozart and “Tobacco” by Tobias Hume in the finals.

Sarah Scofield
Sarah Scofield

Sarah Schofield, a freshman from West Lafayette, Ind., won the women’s first-year college classical division. She performed “Winter” by Dominick Argento, “Il fervido desiderio” by Vincenzo Bellini and “L’Énamourée” by Reynaldo Hahn.

Fahrenkrug and Reever are students of John Gates. Schofield and Hellermann study in the voice studio of Joanne Bozeman. Austin is a student of Ken Bozeman. All five students received $150 for their winning performances.

Lawrence was represented in the NATS competition by 41 singers, 26 of whom reached the semifinals and 10 who reached the finals.

Freshman Marieke de Koker, Pretoria, South Africa, and sophomore Emily Richter, London, England, both earned second-place honors in their respective divisions while freshman Baron Lam., Galesburg, Ill., and junior Anna Mosoriak, Highland, Ind., earned a third-place recognition in their respective categories. Mosoriak also placed third in the women’s upper-level college musical theatre division.

Second-place finishers received $125 while third-place performers were awarded $100.

The NATS competition features 28 separate divisions grouped by gender and level. Depending upon the category, competitors are required to sing two, three or four classical pieces from different time periods with at least one selection sung in a foreign language.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

 

Attention all smilers: Professor Rob Neilson needs you for public art project at Fox Cities Exhibition Center

For anyone who has ever dreamed of being “immortalized,” now is your chance.

Rob Neilson
Rob Neilson

Rob Neilson, Frederick R. Layton Professor of Art at Lawrence University, is looking for nearly 10,000 people who would be willing to have their face — in the form of a headshot — included in the commissioned art project “We Are Here” that will be installed in the new Fox Cities Exhibition Center.

The finished project will be a series of 10 individual portraits. Covering an area 10-feet-by-7-feet, each individual “face” will be a mosaic made up of nearly 1,000 individual photographs of people from throughout the Fox Cities.

Neilson will be taking photos of anyone interested in being included in the project on the following days and locations:

• Downtown Appleton Farm Market – Nov. 11: 9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.artist rendering of We Are Here portrait project at Fox Cities Exhibition Center

• Appleton Public Library — Nov. 18: 9 a.m.-12 p.m.

• Fox Cities Performing Arts Center — Nov. 8: 5:30-7:30 p.m.; Nov. 9: 7- 8:30 p.m.

“After completing public art projects all over the country, I’m thrilled, and a just a bit overwhelmed, to be undertaking this enormous community-based art project here in my hometown,” said Neilson. “The opportunity to create a public art project in the Fox Cities that is not only for the public but also about the public has provided me the chance to engage face to face with people throughout our community and reminds us all that we are the public in public art.”

Mosaic portraitThe “We Are Here” project was commissioned by the city of Appleton and will be installed on the ground floor of the Fox Cities Exhibition Center. The grand opening celebration for the center is scheduled for Jan. 11, 2018.

For more information on the project, visit http://www.weareherefoxcities.com/ or http://www.facebook.com/WeAreHerePublicProject.

If any area group or business or event anywhere in the Fox Cities would like to schedule an opportunity to participate, contact the project at: WeAreHereFoxCities@gmail.com.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Interfaith panel to explore themes in the film “Easter Mysteries”

John O'Boyle
John O’Boyle

The Easter narrative will be explored through a screening of the 2016 musical feature film “Easter Mysteries” followed by an interfaith panel discussion Wednesday, Nov. 8 at 6 p.m. in Lawrence University’s Warch Campus Center cinema. The event is free and open to the public.

John O’Boyle, a 1969 Lawrence graduate, will introduce the film, for which he was the lead producer. He also wrote the music, libretto and lyrics for the film. Featuring a culturally diverse cast of talented roadway veterans who have appeared in such hits as “Les Miserables,” “Porgy and Bess” “Phantom of the Opera” among others, “Easter Mysteries” is the first depiction of Christ’s death and resurrection told through the eyes of the disciple Peter.

The film shines new light on the Biblical story of Jesus Christ in human terms: ordinary people with hopes, dreams and fears, uncertain of what lies ahead, but in following his journey to the cross and eventual resurrection, they learn the valuable lesson of love.

O’Boyle is a two-time Tony Award-winning producer of a host of Broadway plays. He earned won Tony Awards for “La Cage aux Folles” in 2010 and “Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike” in 2013.

He also has produced Broadway productions of August Wilson’s “Radio Golf,” Mark Twain’s “Is He Dead?,” “A Catered Affair,”“Glory Days,” “Elling,” and “It Shoulda Been You” and a stage production of “Marguerite” in London.

After earning a bachelor’s degree in theatre at Lawrence, O’Boyle earned a master of fine arts degree in direction from Catholic University.

Rev. Mike Goodwin
Rev. Mike Goodwin
Jerry Zabronsky
Jerry Zabronsky
Elliot Ratzman
Elliot Ratzman

Following the film, Linda Morgan-Clement, Julie Esch Hurvis Dean of Spiritual and Religious Life, will moderate a panel discussion focused on the film’s intent to tell the Easter narrative in a way that removes some of the historically anti-Semitic overtones while inviting Jewish-Christian dialogue.

Joining Morgan-Clement on the panel will be Rev. Mike Goodwin of Appleton’s Memorial Presbyterian Church; Jerry Zabronsky, president of Appleton’s Moses Montefiore Synagogue; Elliot Ratzman, postdoctoral fellow of Jewish studies in Lawrence’s religious studies department; Lawrence senior Ellen Jacobson and junior Rebecca Bernheimer.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Set the Expectation: Survivor-activist Brenda Tracy leads program on sexual assault

Brenda Tracy shares her story of being a sexual assault survivor Tuesday, Nov. 7 in a Lawrence University presentation-discussion. The event, “Set the Expectation,” at 5 p.m. in the Warch Campus Center, is only open to members of the Lawrence community.

Following her talk, Tracy will facilitate a group discussion on sexual assault.

Brenda Tracy
Brenda Tracy

Tracy was 24, a single mother of two boys working as a waitress in the small Oregon town of Keizer, a suburb of the state capital, Salem, in June, 1998. On a trip to Corvallis with her best friend to visit the friend’s boyfriend and others, Tracy wound up being gang raped by four men, including two members of the Oregon State University football team, during what she told police was a seven-hour ordeal.

The four men were arrested and booked into jail, but were never charged with a crime. The district attorney had a solid case, but needed Tracy’s cooperation to get a conviction. For a variety of reasons, she wavered.

In a 2014 interview with The Oregonian newspaper — the first time she had ever been publicly identified as the victim — Tracy spoke about having been sexually abused as a minor, up until age five by a family member, and again by a neighbor when she was nine. Following the incident in Corvallis, she felt she was a victim, on her own again, and wasn’t strong enough to deal with any of it.

“What happened to me was not my choice,” Tracy told the paper. “What they did to me was not my choice. They violated me. I was garbage to them. I’d made my mind up after talking to police that I was going to do the rape examination, then I was going to go kill myself. I was going to commit suicide. I was already dead.”

Instead, she found the strength to earn a bachelor’s degree in nursing and later an MBA. Today she shares her story as an activist-survivor nationally, works as a registered nurse in Portland, Ore., and serves as a consultant for Oregon State University.

“In recent months sexual violence has received extra attention through social media campaigns,” said junior Elias Hubbard, secretary of the student organization MARS (Men Against Rape and Sexism), which is hosting the event. “While this is a great step forward in recognizing the extent it proliferates our society, we need to do more. Men need to do more. Brenda Tracy’s message is one of inclusion and has proven effective at bringing men into the struggle to end sexual violence.”

In conjunction with MARS, which considers the roots of sexual assault and works toward a goal of prevention, Tracy’s visit is supported by Fox Valley Voices of Men, the Sexual Assault Crisis Center, Reach Counseling, Harbor House and Christine Ann Domestic Abuse Services Inc., with funding provided by the Community Health Action Team (CHAT) of ThedaCare and the the Bright Idea Fund within the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region, Inc.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Lizz Wright, Storms/Nocturnes headline Fred Sturm Jazz Celebration Weekend

Acclaimed singer-songwriter Lizz Wright and the immersive trio Storms/Nocturnes headline Lawrence University’s 37th annual salute to all things jazz.

Lizz Wright outdoors leaning on a fence
Singer Lizz Wright opens this year’s Fred Sturm Jazz Celebration Weekend with a performance Friday, Nov. 3 at 7:30 p.m. (Photo by Jesse Kitt.)

Wright opens the two-concert weekend Friday, Nov. 3 at 7:30 p.m. while Storms/Nocturnes shares the stage with Lawrence’s own 18-member jazz ensemble Saturday, Nov. 4 at 7:30 p.m. to close the Fred Sturm Jazz Celebration Weekend. Both concerts are in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel.

Tickets, at $30/$25 for adults, $25/$20 for seniors and $20/$18 for students are available through the Lawrence Box Office, 920-832-6749.

Wright, who NPR describes as “a sophisticated straddler of down-home blues, jazz, gospel, folk, southern pop and confessional singer-songwriter traditions,” will feature her latest studio album “Grace,” which was released in September. The album is an unadulterated reflection of Wright’s sense of place and belonging that’s deeply woven into the cultural fabric of America.

An invitation to openly contemplate our humanity, “Grace” is Wright’s proclamation to unearth our fundamental kindness and generosity. She uses it as vocal rite of passage, tracing the landscape between her native central and south Georgia and the Blue Ridge Mountains of Asheville, N.C., where she currently makes her home.

“Grace” showcases the warm and weathered colors of Wright’s voice. Leaning into curated classics and contemporary covers, she pierces form with gentle and unfettered individuality.Album colver for Lizz Wright's "Grace"

“Lizz Wright is one of the most captivating vocalists in the jazz world today” said Patty Darling, director of the Lawrence University Jazz Ensemble and instructor of music. “With her powerful voice, she blends elements of gospel, blues, jazz, folk and pop music to create songs that inspire and connect her audiences.”

Storms/Nocturnes, a trio of international jazz giants — British saxophone legend Tim Garland, world-leading vibraphone virtuoso Joe Locke and Grammy Award-nominee pianist Geoffrey Keezer — create a unique three-way dialogue of captivating, immersive music. Melding their distinct styles and backgrounds, they create music that can be spacious or immensely complex, delicate but almost orchestral in depth. They collectively find their way into a new mood or feel before the listener realizes they have left the old one.

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Lizz Wright is one of the most captivating vocalists in the jazz world today.”
— Patty Darling, director of the Lawrence University Jazz Ensemble
_________________________________________________

Garland was voted “Musician of the Year” in 2006 by the Cross-Parliamentary Jazz Society. He has received commissions from the London Symphony Orchestra, the BBC Concert Orchestra and the Westminster Abbey Choir, as well as numerous small and large jazz-based ensembles.

He earned a 2009 Grammy Award for helping create “The New Crystal Silence,” which celebrated the long partnership between jazz legends Chick Corea and Gary Burton.

Locke, a vibraphonist renowned for stunning physical power and broad emotional range, has topped music polls and won multiple awards, including Earshot Golden Ear Awards for “Concert of the Year” and 2016 “Mallet Player of the Year” from the Jazz Journalists Association.

Jazz trio Storms/Nocturnes
Storms/Nocturnes — pianist Geoffrey Keezer, saxophonist Tim Garland and vibraphonist Tim Locke — perform Saturday, Nov. 4 at 7:30 as part of Fred Sturm Jezz Celebration Weekend. They’ll be joined by the Lawrence University Jezz Ensemble.

London’s Royal Academy of Music appointed Locke Visiting International Vibraphone Consultant in 2008 and last year he was honored by his hometown of Rochester, N.Y., with induction into the city’s Music Hall of Fame.

Keezer, an Eau Claire native and two-time Grammy Award nominee, began playing jazz clubs as a teenager and was touring the country in his 20s with such jazz luminaries as Joshua Redman and Benny Golson.

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They are incredible performers and composers who are so tight in their bonds with each other. Their musical energy, passion and communication must be experienced.”
— Patty Darling on Storms/Nocturnes
__________________________________________

His intellectually abstract lyricism woven over exotically complex rhythms and harmonies makes him one of the most sought-after artists on the modern jazz scene.

Keezer has performed on projects ranging from solo to duo to quartet, from bandleader to big band, from post-bop jazz to electronica to global fusion. His 2009 CD “Áurea” earned a Best Latin Jazz album Grammy nomination. He teamed with Garland and Locke on the album “Via” in 2011 while he released his latest solo piano disk, “Heart of the Piano” in 2013.

Darling is excited about having LUJE join the talented trio on stage.

“They are incredible performers and composers who are so tight in their bonds with each other,” said Darling. “Their musical energy, passion and communication must be experienced. It will be a huge thrill for our students to perform with them.”

In addition to the two evening concerts, Fred Sturm Jazz Celebration Weekend features a series of free performances and clinics by Lawrence combos, big bands, jazz faculty and high school bands, with more than 700 high school and middle school students participating throughout the day on Saturday. A complete schedule can be found here.

Lawrence’s annual Jazz Celebration Weekend was renamed two years ago in honor of long-time music professor Fred Sturm, its founder and mentor who passed away in 2014.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.