You lost what? Our search of campus lost-and-found bins turns up 10 curious things

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

It happens to the best of us. Sometimes Lawrentians lose track of their belongings in the bustle of student life, and you never know what will turn up in the lost-and-found bins on campus. We visited some of these lost-and-found locations and picked out 10 curious misplaced items.

Photo of gray desk organizer.

#10 | Desk organizer

Pens and pencils, paperclips and highlights all without a home. It’s pretty hard to stay organized when you lose your entire desk organizer. Someone out there could use some tips on keeping track of things.

Photo of small painting featuring what appears to be planets covered in pink smears of paint.

#9 | Art

Even Lawrence’s lost and found bins are artistic. Who would leave this behind? The artist’s identity is a mystery. . .

Photo of amber-colored bow rosin for the bow of a string instrument.

#8 | Bow rosin

A string player’s best friend. As a former cellist it’s no surprise to see this in the lost and found. Really, has anyone in history ever gone through all their rosin before losing or breaking it? Users of ChapStick might be familiar with the phenomenon.

Photo of red and blue coffee mug featuring the letter "A."

#7 | Personalized letter “A” mug

Is there an Archie or Alyssa out there looking for their favorite mug? A personal mug like this one can make that daily cup (or many cups) of hot tea or coffee even more special and integral to your day.

Photo of white sheets of paper on which lyrics are scribbled.

#6 | Handwritten lyrics

Poetic talents abound on campus. Maybe this person didn’t like their work and chose to abandon it. Who knows, this could have been the beginning of the next greatest hit.

Photo of sparkly paper St. Patrick's Day decoration adorned with shamrocks and a green top hat.

#5 | Hanging shamrock wall decoration

This is probably the remnant of someone’s St. Patrick’s Day party that was discarded after the festivities. But the party hasn’t stopped; this decoration has been coating everything else in the lost-and-found bin in glitter.

Photo of packaged pumpkin carving kit.

#4 | Pumpkin carving kit

There is surely a faceless jack-o-lantern looking for this. This pumpkin-carving kit was misplaced before it could be opened and used. Maybe it will be reclaimed in time for next Halloween.

Red rolled-up sleeping bag.

#3 | Red sleeping bag

It’s unclear if this was ever used; maybe for a spontaneous camping trip? Or a camping trip that never happened? Regardless, it’s a strange thing to lose!

Photo of gray mesh zippered bag full of shampoo and other shower needs.

#2 | A whole shower caddy

How does one lose a shower caddy? A more vexing question, how does one lose it in the Conservatory where this was found? I’d like to hear the explanation behind this one.

Photo of Lawrence draw-string bag full of paints and brushes.

#1 | A bag of acrylic paints and paintbrushes

What’s an artist without their supplies? Whether these belonged to an art student here at Lawrence or just someone with a artsy hobby, I hope they come looking for their supplies soon so they can get back to creating masterpieces.

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Longboarding, anyone? Student clubs offer chances to get outside, be active

Story by Awa Badiane ’21

It’s spring. The sun is shining. It’s time to get outdoors and get active.

For Lawrence University students, the opportunities to do so as part of organized clubs are plentiful.

Longboarding or other skateboarding? Rock climbing? Biking? Rowing? Take your pick of those and many more.

Lawrence makes it incredibly easy for students to come together and pursue their passions. To start a club on campus, all you need is an idea and two friends, and your idea can become a Lawrence official club.

As an official club on campus, you can easily pursue your interests with help from campus coordinators, and potentially funding assistance from the university.  A lot of students take advantage of how efficient it is to start something on campus, making it pretty easy for students to find something fun to do. Everything from the Baking and Cooking Club to Sailing Lawrence will give students the opportunity to try something new.

For a directory of student organizations at Lawrence, click here.

As the weather warms up, students can take advantage of the long list of activities to partake in while enjoying the great outdoors.  

The Women’s Longboarding Club is an example of just one such opportunity.  

“I love riding with other people,” said Angela Caraballo ’21. “It’s fun to see others enjoying something that I also enjoy.”  

With meetings every Sunday afternoon, the Women’s Longboarding Club gives newcomers the chance to learn longboarding and gives experienced riders a chance to connect with other Lawrentians who share their interests.

“The thrill of riding around so freely, feeling the wind rush around me, is exhilarating,” said Jailene Rodriguez ’21. 

There are plenty of other opportunities to enjoy being outside both on and off campus. With clubs such as the Rock Climbers Club and Rowing Club, students are able to explore parts of Wisconsin they may have never seen.  And there’s a Badminton Club, a Slacklining Club, a Flag Football Club, a Bike Club, among others.

Rowing Club gives students the opportunity to row in various parts of Wisconsin and compete against other schools.  

In a similar fashion, the Rock Climbers Club gives students the opportunity to go to different hiking sites or rock climbing walls throughout the Midwest.  

“My favorite thing about Rock Climbers Club is that everyone starts out on the same level and folks are welcoming to newcomers,” said Spencer Washington ’21. “You don’t need much experience but rather openness and a willingness to trust your own movement.”

That goes for almost all of the student clubs. You don’t have to have any experience to join. You can be anywhere from novice to intermediate and still be able to participate in any of the clubs offered on Lawrence’s campus.  

So, what are you waiting for? Let’s get active.

(Photos above are Rebecca Minkus ’20 and Earl Simons ’22)

Awa Badiane ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office. 

Sunshine, please: 19 things to know as you prep for Lawrence’s 2019 Commencement

The march across College Avenue to the Main Hall green, led by Faculty Marshal Kathy Privatt and President Mark Burstein (right), will again be part of Lawrence University’s Commencement. The ceremony, the 170th in the school’s history, is set for 10 a.m. on Sunday, June 9.

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

We’re just a couple of short weeks away from Lawrence University’s 2019 Commencement, the 170th in the school’s storied history.

Here are 19 things to know as you prepare for the big day.

1. Sunday morning celebration: The ceremony on the Main Hall green will begin at 10 a.m. on Sunday, June 9. All comers are welcome. The big tent that usually covers the seating area is not available this year, so it’ll be an open-air event. An alternate indoor site on campus — with limited seating — will be prepped for use should the weather be such that an outdoor ceremony is not possible. Watch for details on the Commencement page of the Lawrence website.

2. A class of brilliance: More than 330 students are expected to take that magical walk across the stage. Of those, 288 are bachelor of arts grads, 28 are bachelor of music grads and 15 are combo B.A./B.Mus. grads. Another 11 are participating in the ceremony but not receiving degrees until December.

Lee Shallat Chemel ’65

3. A speaker from stage and screen: Commencement speaker Lee Shallat Chemel ’65 will return to campus with stories to tell and wisdom to mine from an impressive career directing theater and television productions. Her deep love of theater was first sparked during her time at Milwaukee-Downer College and then Lawrence. After more than 15 years directing theater, most notably during a 10-year stint as conservatory director at South Coast Repertory in Orange County, California, she transitioned to the small screen, directing for such notable TV shows as “Family Ties,” “Murphy Brown,” “Arrested Development,” “The Bernie Mac Show,” “Gilmore Girls” and, most recently, “The Middle.”

Jordyn Pleiseis

4. From the senior class: Commencement also features words of insight and wisdom from a member of the senior class. This year’s speaker, selected by her peers, will be Jordyn Pleiseis ’19, an anthropology major from Milwaukee.

5. Saying goodbye: Honoring retiring faculty is always a significant — and often emotional — part of Commencement. The Lawrence community will be celebrating two long-serving tenured faculty as they bid adieu to the classroom, Bruce Hetzler, professor of psychology, and Kenneth Bozeman, the Shattuck Professor of Music in the Conservatory of Music’s voice department. Both have taught hundreds (maybe thousands) of Lawrentians during their celebrated four decades-plus at Lawrence.

6. Livestream available: A livestream of the ceremony will be available for viewing in real time. It’s an opportunity to watch the ceremony online if you can’t be in attendance. The livestream can be accessed at the time of the event from the Commencement page.

There will again be plenty of opportunities for photos following Commencement.

7. Smile, you’re on camera: Yes, there will be plenty of opportunities for family and friends to take photos of their graduates. A designated spot will be set up during the ceremony. Please be considerate of your fellow attendees. There also will be photo-friendly spots set up for photos after the ceremony.

8. Talent on display: Commencement weekend is a chance for seniors to show some skills, with a Senior Art Exhibition in the Wriston Art Center Galleries set for Friday (10 a.m. to 6 p.m.), Saturday (10 a.m. to 6 p.m.) and Sunday (noon to 4 p.m.) and a Commencement Concert featuring members of the Class of 2019 planned for 7:30 p.m. Friday in Memorial Chapel. Look for a reception following the concert in Shattuck Hall, Room 163.

9. Spiritual journey: On Saturday, the 11 a.m. Baccalaureate Service, a multi-faith celebration of the spiritual journey of the Class of 2019, will be held in Memorial Chapel. Assistant Professor of Religious Studies Constance Kassor will deliver the address. It’s presented for seniors and their families.

10. Picnic moves indoors: The annual Commencement weekend picnic at noon on Saturday, held on the Main Hall green in past years, has been moved inside the Warch Campus Center. Seniors and their families, as well as faculty and staff, are invited. Following the picnic, President Mark Burstein will host a reception for seniors and their families at the president’s home from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

11. In search of parking: Parking is available in the city parking ramp just west of campus. Some street parking is available around campus but availability can’t be guaranteed. Here is some helpful parking info from the City of Appleton.

12. There will be awards: As per tradition, several of Lawrence’s most cherished awards will be handed out to faculty during the Commencement ceremony — the University Award for Excellence in Teaching, Award for Excellence in Scholarship or Creative Activity, and Excellence in Teaching by an Early Career Faculty Member. The winners are not announced until Commencement.

Graduation hats are part of the Commencement day attire. Decorations are optional.

13. Dressed for success: The regalia of Commencement is among the great traditions of higher education — the gowns, the caps, the hoods, the cords all signaling a particular accomplishment along the journey of academia.

14. Music to come and go: Speaking of grand traditions, the music of the processional and the recessional will embrace this group of graduates, courtesy of the Lawrence University Graduation Band. Andrew Mast will again conduct as the band performs Crown Imperial by William Walton for the processional and Procession of the Nobles by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for the recessional.

15. Familiar and new faces: Led by President Mark Burstein, there will be familiarity in the ceremony. Kathy Privatt, the James G. and Ethel M. Barber Professor of Theatre and Drama, will again serve as faculty marshal. David C. Blowers, chair of the Board of Trustees, will offer the convocation for the second year in a row. Provost and Dean of Faculty Catherine Kodat will present the faculty awards. One notable change will come in the opening and closing words, a duty handled for many years by Howard E. Niblock. He retired last year, and that honor now falls to Linda Morgan-Clement, the Julie Esch Hurvis Dean of Spiritual and Religious Life.

The Class of 2019 displays its green flag during Welcome Week four years ago. Per tradition, each class is assigned one of four colors.

16. Class colors: Look for plenty of green to be on display during Commencement. The tradition of assigning a color — red, green, yellow, or purple — to each class at Lawrence has its roots in Milwaukee-Downer history. It was reinstated at Lawrence in 1988 and has continued since. The color of the Class of 2019 is green.

17. Conferring of degrees: That magical moment when the graduates’ names are called and they make the walk across the stage and the degrees are conferred is the heart and soul of any Commencement ceremony. Handling those duties for bachelor of music recipients will be Burstein and Dean of Conservatory Brian Pertl ’86. Handling for bachelor of arts recipients will be Burstein and Kodat.

18. A parade of another sort: A parade of graduates isn’t the only parade during the June 8-9 weekend that might get your attention. The 68th annual Flag Day Parade will march through downtown Appleton beginning at 2 p.m. Saturday. It will affect traffic in the downtown area as thousands of onlookers line the streets to watch the state’s oldest Flag Day parade. It’ll start on Oneida Street at Wisconsin Avenue, make its way to College Avenue, then proceed through the downtown, turning north at Drew Street and ending at City Park. See details here.

19. A Juneteenth celebration: Speaking of city events near campus, you may also want to note this one on your calendar. Appleton’s ninth annual Juneteenth Celebration will take place from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday in City Park, providing a possible post-Commencement destination. It also will affect parking near the campus in the afternoon hours.

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

New studies, research put Lawrence on front lines of bee advocacy

Israel Del Toro, dressed in a protective suit, preps honeybees for the observational hive on the roof of the Warch Campus Center.
Israel Del Toro prepares to release honeybees to an observational hive on the roof of Lawrence University’s Warch Campus Center. The hive is visible from inside the Warch on the fourth floor.

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

Israel Del Toro’s advocacy for bees — fun fact: there are upwards of 100 different species of bees in Appleton alone — is no secret.

The Lawrence University assistant professor of biology has been championing bees and the untold benefits they bring to our ecosystem since he arrived on campus three years ago. He launched the Appleton Pollinator Project to turn homeowners and gardeners into citizen scientists, helped install and study pollination sites across the Fox Cities, and pushed students in his biology lab and campus environmental clubs to work to improve the on-campus habitat for bees.

Now Del Toro is stepping up that advocacy to another level, working to get Lawrence designated as a bee-friendly campus via Bee City USA, an initiative of Xerces Society. There are currently 70 campuses across the country that hold the bee-friendly designation.

All expectations are that Lawrence will be No. 71, and only the second in Wisconsin.

Del Toro submitted Lawrence’s proposal in early May, spotlighting the school’s sustainability push, the efforts to eliminate invasive species that work to the detriment of bees, the planting of bee-friendly wildflowers, the ongoing research activities and the educational outreach on and off campus.

“The goal is to use the campus as this big lab to try to figure out what the best practices are for managing bee diversity in urban landscapes,” Del Toro said.

To help connect Lawrence faculty, students and staff with the wonders of honeybees, Del Toro donned a protective suit last week and released bees into an observational hive set up on the roof of the Warch Campus Center, visible from behind the safety of glass on the building’s fourth floor.

“It’ll be an active colony that we hope will last for three years,” Del Toro said.

“People can’t actually touch the bees but the hives themselves have a plexiglass window so you can look inside and see the bees doing their bee thing and building honeycomb and foraging and dancing.”

A formal unveiling of the observational hive will be held in June, complete with a bee-inspired picnic featuring foods that require bee pollination — think apple pie, blueberry treats and avocado smoothies. Stay tuned for time, date and details.

Bee science

The observational hive at Warch offers an up-close look at the honeybee, the best known of the bee species that are here, but that’s just the start of the bee-focused educational opportunities on campus.

There are 10 different bee species known to be on Main Hall green, mostly housed in the hexagon-shaped pollination box just southeast of Main Hall. But another 32 species are known to inhabit S.L.U.G. (Sustainable Lawrence University Gardens), where students actively maintain a bee-friendly space with blooming flowers, native wildflowers and the ongoing removal of invasive plants.

The hexagon-shaped pollination box is on the Main Hall green, near Youngchild Hall.
A pollination box is on the Main Hall green near Youngchild Hall, home to multiple species of bees.

Del Toro is also working with City of Appleton officials to get the city designated a Bee City. It’s all part of the efforts to educate people on the ecosystem importance of bees and the dangers that exist when we’re not being good stewards of the land.

“It reflects some of the important values of Lawrence,” Del Toro said of the bee-friendly campus and city efforts. “Lawrence has always been very progressive thinking. Sustainability is a big issue now. We want to make sure that in the time of climate change and biodiversity loss, we are a leader in setting the proper example. If all we can impact is our little 88 acres on campus, well, that’s a great starting point. We can lead by example. I think that’s a really great example of the ethos of Lawrence.”

As long as we can get past the misconceptions about bees — no, they are not looking to sting you — it’s also good for student recruitment, Del Toro said.

“I would hope something like this is drawing students who are more sustainably focused and are thinking about issues like conservation and ecology and conservation biology,” he said.

For more on Lawrence’s biology and related offerings, click here.

For more on Lawrence’s geosciences and related offerings, click here.

Hands-on learning

That sort of thinking drew in Maggie Anderson ’19 , a farm girl from northern Minnesota who came to Lawrence with an interest in biology and found the field work that was part of the Del Toro-led bee studies to her liking. She’ll graduate in June, then head to the University of Minnesota to pursue a doctorate while researching bees in prairie ecosystems.

“I didn’t necessarily come in with an intent to study bees, but it kind of became apparent soon after I got here that that was something I was really interested in,” Anderson said.





“It’s given me a lot of
really great research experience.”

Maggie Anderson ’19

What she got at Lawrence in terms of hands-on research opportunities was “really more than I expected,” she said.

That kind of scientific research doesn’t start and stop with bees, though. Ecological-focused work is happening across departments at Lawrence, from biology to natural sciences to environmental sciences, where faculty and students are working on studies in such wide-ranging but critical areas as aquatic ecosystems, endangered plants, bat conservation, soil ecology, and hydrology, to name a few.

“This is one tiny thing we do,” Del Toro said of the bees. “We’re doing a lot of cool science. What that means for our students is they get to go on this ride with us as we’re doing really cutting-edge science.”

Del Toro and his wife, Relena Ribbons, a visiting assistant professor of biology who will become a tenure-track faculty member in the fall, have been leaders in the citizen science project, an effort launched last year to build nearly 60 garden beds in back yards across the Fox Cities. The garden beds, designed to grow vegetables, are split in two, one half pollinated by insects, the other half cordoned off by mesh to keep bees and other insects out.

The homeowners keep the veggies in exchange for providing data from their gardens. Del Toro, Ribbons and their students then analyze the results as they come in.

Israel Del Toro head shot
Del Toro

“What we found from last year’s research is that bees are probably contributing to a market here in the Fox Cities that’s worth roughly $80,000 to $100,000 a year in pollination ecosystem services,” Del Toro said. “That’s based on the amount of produce that gets pollinated by bees in our back yards.”

For Anderson, the interaction with the community has been as enlightening as the work with the bees.

“It’s given me a lot of really great research experience, but also communication experience,” the senior biology and music double major said. “Working with people is a really undervalued part of science, especially in the conservation field that I want to go into. You have to work with people a lot, and you have to know how to communicate.”

Her fellow students, Anderson said, have embraced her bee research and the idea of this being a bee-friendly campus.

“In this campus environment, people really do get that,” she said. “People really do understand that we are up against a lot of environmental issues when we talk about bees in terms of habitat loss and bees just not having enough resources in an urban setting. We need to make a nice, available on-campus habitat for bees, and students and staff to my knowledge have been really, really supportive of that.”

Today (May 20) is World Bee Day. And National Pollinator Week arrives on June 17, just in time for Del Toro’s pollination-themed picnic. No better time to salute these researchers as they create the biggest buzz on campus.

Did we mention there will be pie?

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu.

Be proud: Lawrence swag every Lawrentian should own

Story by Awa Badiane ’21

Whenever I go home for break, I get asked one of two questions, “What school do you go to again?” and “What did you bring me?” That’s why I have compiled this list of Lawrence swag every Lawrentian should own, so we can all be prepared when it’s time to head home for the summer. Take a piece of Lawrence home for yourself and have something to give to someone else.  

1) Lawrence hoodie

Who doesn’t love a good hoodie? Especially a lined hoodie, with a reliable drawstring, that you can wear with everything! Every Lawrentian should own their very own classic Lawrence hoodie, and you can get one in Kate’s Corner Store located in the Warch Campus Center. A classic Lawrence hoodie and a pair of black leggings is the perfect outfit for any day.  

Male Lawrence student wearing navy blue Lawrence University hooded sweatshirt.

2) Class T-shirts 

Go Class of 2021! During Welcome Week, Lawrence starts off every Lawrentian’s collection of Lawrence gear by giving students their very own class shirts. Each class shirt has the class year and is the color that class is associated with.  Learn more about the tradition of Class Colors here.

Female Lawrence student wearing purple Lawrence Class t-shirt.

3) Lawrence phone accessories 

Never lose your ID again! With the Diversity and Intercultural Center-sponsored card holder, you can have all you most important cards on the back of your phone. Just peel of the paper lining and stick the holder to any case or directly on your phone. Or you can stop by Kate’s Corner Store and get yourself a Lawrence pop-socket! Now all you’ll need is your phone to show off some Lawrence pride. 

4) Vintage Lawrence  

BINGO! There are so many opportunities to win free Lawrence gear on campus. At a lot of these events you’ll have the opportunity to win some Lawrence classics that are no longer available for sale but are still very cute. I won my favorite Lawrence top from a BINGO game!  

Female Lawrence student wearing white Lawrence University long-sleeve shirt.

5) Glow-in-the-dark Lawrence water bottle 

The name honestly says it all. This addition to the Lawrence swag list was made available starting just this year. Glowing makes anything cool and having a water bottle that glows in the dark and represents Lawrence is the coolest thing ever. These water bottles are available for sale in Kate’s Corner Store.

These are my five essentials. Itching for more? Stop by Kate’s Corner Store in Warch or check out this site full of Lawrence gear. Do you have other Lawrence swag you can’t live without? Tell us all about it in our social media comments!

Awa Badiane ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Lawrence to welcome five talented tenure-track faculty in the fall

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

Five new tenure-track faculty members will join Lawrence University for the start of the 2019-20 academic year, boosting the school’s academic prowess across multiple fields of study.

The appointments include Abhishek Chakraborty, statistics; Estelí Gomez, Conservatory of Music (voice); Vanessa D. Plumly, German; Relena Ribbons, geosciences; and Austin Segrest, English.

The new hires were announced by Provost and Dean of Faculty Catherine Kodat.

“I am delighted to be able to welcome five new tenure-track faculty to Lawrence this coming fall,” Kodat said. “These impressive new colleagues represent the best in their fields and will allow us to continue building on our strengths in mathematics, the sciences, and the humanities in the college, and in the voice program in the conservatory.”

The tenure-track hires include:

Abhishek Chakraborty, statistics

Chakraborty head shot
Chakraborty

A candidate this spring for a Ph.D. in the Department of Statistics at Iowa State University, Chakraborty holds a master’s degree in statistics from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) in Kanpur, India, and a bachelor’s of science degree in statistics from St. Xavier’s College in Kolkata, India. He ranked fifth out of 200 entrants from 100 different countries in the Prudsys AG Data Mining Cup 2016, and placed 28th out of 193 entrants in 2018. He worked as a graduate teaching assistant at Iowa State.

His research experience has focused on developing statistical methodologies for analysis of complex data sets, with broad work in the fields of machine learning, data mining, predictive modeling and the application of Bayesian variables.

“Abhishek joins a newly renamed Mathematics and Computer Science department as our second specialist in statistics,” Kodat said. “His research interests in data mining will fortify course offerings in data science as well as statistics more traditionally understood — an exciting contribution for a department in the midst of a renaissance.”

For more on the computer science major at Lawrence, click here.

For more on the mathematics major at Lawrence, click here.

Estelí Gomez, voice

Gomez head shot
Gomez

A soprano, Gomez joins the Conservatory of Music amid impressive success as a recording artist and performer. She is a vocalist with Roomful of Teeth, which won a 2014 Grammy Award with its debut CD. Also, she was a vocalist on Silk Road Ensemble’s 2017 Grammy-winning CD Sing Me Home, featuring members of Roomful of Teeth. She was nominated for a 2017 Gramophone Award as soprano soloist on the Seattle Symphony’s release of Carl Nielsen’s Symphony No 3. She holds a master of music degree from the McGill Schulich School of Music and a bachelor of arts degree in music from Yale.

Roomful of Teeth has performed at Lawrence twice, once in 2014 and again in 2017. The eight-piece a cappella ensemble has been much lauded in vocal circles since debuting in 2009. Gomez, who has sung in more than 20 languages, has taught in private voice studios since 2006, mostly in New Haven, Connecticut, Montreal and New York City.

“A founding member of the celebrated vocal ensemble Roomful of Teeth, Estelí exemplifies the twin commitments to excellence in teaching and performance that characterizes our conservatory faculty,” Kodat said.

For more on the Voice Studio in the Conservatory of Music, click here.   

Vanessa D. Plumly, German

Plumly mug
Plumly

Plumly comes to Lawrence from State University of New York at New Paltz, where she is a German lecturer and program coordinator in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures and a Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies faculty affiliate. She has been there since 2015. She earned her Ph.D. in German Studies in 2015 from the University of Cincinnati. She holds a master of arts degree in German Studies from the University of Kentucky and a bachelor of arts degree in German and History from Bethany College in West Virginia.

Plumly earned the 2018 German Embassy Teacher of Excellence Award from the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG). She was a Fulbright Research Fellowship Alternate in 2013.

“Vanessa’s research interests in Afro-German culture, film, and gender and sexuality studies will enrich many areas of our curriculum beyond German: Ethnic Studies, Film Studies, and Gender Studies, to name three,” Kodat said. “She joins us as our third Mellon Faculty Fellow for a Diverse Professoriate.”

For more on German studies at Lawrence, click here.

Relena Ribbons, geosciences

Ribbons head shot
Ribbons

A visiting assistant professor in geosciences at Lawrence since 2016, Ribbons has a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies from Wellesley College, a masters in forest ecology from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and doctorates in forest ecology, geosciences and natural resources from Bangor University and geosciences and natural resources management from the University of Copenhagen.

She’s also an accomplished marathoner and ultramarathoner.

“Relena’s appointment to the Geosciences department gives us additional expertise in important areas of environmental research, among them soil ecology and biogeochemistry,” Kodat said. “And we are always happy to welcome another marathoner to the Lawrence faculty family.”

For more on Lawrence’s geosciences major, click here.

Austin Segrest, English

Segrest head shot
Segrest

A visiting assistant professor of English at Lawrence since 2014, Segrest holds a doctorate in literature and creative writing (poetry) from the University of Missouri and a master’s from Georgia State University. He has received fellowships from the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, the Sewanee Writers’ Conference and the National Endowment for the Humanities, and previously served as the poetry editor of the Missouri Review.

“We now have three accomplished, actively publishing writers who are either tenured or on the tenure track in our English department, a great boon for our student writers in both the college and the conservatory,” Kodat said.

For more on English offerings at Lawrence, click here.

Six-figure grant a vote of confidence for LU prof’s youth mental health app

Lori Hilt, Caroline Swords and Sara Prostko pose for a photo in the psychology department.
Associate Professor of Psychology Lori Hilt (left) is working with psychology students Caroline Swords (center) and Sara Prostko on a rumination study. A new grant is expanding and extending the study.

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

This will come as a shock to no one, but middle school is hard.

Throw in the first year of high school and you have a three- or four-year stretch that for many is an often emotionally difficult, awkward, angst-filled journey through adolescent hell, a transition from the relative safety of elementary school to the more confident (sometimes) world of young adulthood.

Getting across that bridge with your emotional bearings intact is no small thing. And that’s where the studies of Lawrence University Associate Professor of Psychology Lori Hilt and her psychology students come into play.

For the past two years, Hilt has been leading a study on adolescent rumination, focused on ages 12 to 15, and the study is about to be supersized thanks to a $368,196 three-year grant from the National Institutes of Health.

Adolescent rumination refers to a mindset in which someone can’t get beyond the negative things that are happening around them. Where most kids will process something bad that has happened, react to it and then move on, an adolescent struggling with rumination will dwell on the negative information, stew on it until it consumes them, unable to let go.

It’s often a precursor to depression or anxiety or other mental health battles that can track into adulthood.

Launching a study

Hilt and the students in her Child and Adolescent Research in Emotion (CARE) Lab set out to create a mobile app that would utilize mindfulness techniques designed to aid those 12- to 15-year-olds struggling with rumination, and then sought funding to study the use of the app.

“We see technology just skyrocketing with kids, so why not harness that for good?” Hilt said.

The American Psychological Foundation agreed, awarding Hilt an $18,000 John and Polly Sparks Early Career Grant two years ago to launch a study that would involve 80 Fox Valley adolescents and their families.

Data from that study has been collected and follow-up visits with the families have been completed. Hilt and her team are in the process of analyzing what they have.

But now comes the much more robust grant from the National Institute of Mental Health, part of the National Institutes of Health, allowing  the study of the app to continue over the next three years, entailing more sophisticated research methods. It’s expected to involve an additional 150 kids and their families. A full-time project assistant will be hired, and 12 to 20 LU students could be working on the study at any given time.

“If the results come out as we hypothesize, if we find that the kids who use the app actually decrease their rumination and their levels of depression and anxiety remain lower, then I think we’d move forward with further developing of the app and maybe get it out publicly, make it available for more kids to use,” Hilt said.

The app is designed to talk young students through brief mindfulness exercises at various points during the day, most notably when they wake up in the morning, after school lets out and before they go to sleep. The exercises could last from three to 10 minutes, focusing on breathing techniques and other things to help clear or refocus the mind.

“It came out of some research I was doing right when I started at Lawrence in 2011,” Hilt said. “One of the first studies I looked at, in the lab, how can we change rumination?”

So, a lab study using 160 kids was conducted, focused on various avenues to combat rumination, from briefly distracting the student to using mindfulness techniques. Mindfulness came out the clear winner.

“If we know that doing this in the lab for just a few minutes was really helpful, what if we had a way for people to access this as an intervention?” Hilt said. “Obviously, we think it needs more repeated exposure to actually be helpful in the long run. So, we developed an app that would allow kids to access it repeatedly.”

For information on participating in the rumination study, click here.

For more on the Psychology Department at Lawrence, click here.

A tech assist

Hilt and her psychology students knew where they wanted to go. But they lacked the technical know-how to create and develop an app.

Thus, they tapped a student in Lawrence’s mathematics-computer science department. Eduardo Elizondo ’16 set to work creating the app.

“He was a freshman at the time,” Hilt said. “Now he’s at Facebook. He really helped develop the first version of the app, and it was kind of clunky. He was learning, we were learning. So then as he became more sophisticated and we got more pilot data, we refined the app. So, before he graduated, it kind of developed into the version we have now.”

Another computer science student, Simon Abbot ’20, has since picked up the ball, continuing the work started by Elizondo.

For the LU psychology students, the work on the rumination study is part of a wider education.

“Since all CARE lab members are undergraduates, we have opportunities at every step in the research process that are normally only available to graduate students,” said Caroline Swords ’19, a neuroscience and psychology major who has been heavily invested in the study and will continue working with it as a research associate after graduation.

The study is focused on practical tools that young people can use to navigate their mental and emotional journeys, she said. And, while the results aren’t in yet, seeing the study unfold over the past couple of years has been fascinating.

“I was drawn to the study because of the positive impact teaching mindfulness can have,” Swords said. “Since adolescence is a time when mental illnesses can first develop, it’s great to teach adolescents about mindfulness, which can act as a buffer and remain a lifelong skill.”  

For Hilt, providing any tools that can help a child adjust, cope and thrive is always worthwhile.

“I’ve really focused my career on studying that early adolescent window,” she said. “We know so many things develop then, including depression. We see pretty low levels, luckily, in childhood, but then in adolescence you see this huge spike that really stays throughout adulthood. So, I’ve really focused all my research on trying to understand what’s going on, how kids process emotions in that window shortly before we see this increase, and what can we do to try to prevent that from happening?”

Existing apps such as Headspace are already available to teach ways to redirect our thoughts or calm our anxieties. But those, and any studies that accompanied them, are primarily geared toward adults, Hilt said.

“We’re one of the first to really look at it in kids.”

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu.

Note: Research tied to the new grant is supported by the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health. The content reported here is solely the responsibility of the author and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

8 restaurants every Lawrentian should try

We asked student writer Isabella Mariani to share a list of her favorite restaurants in Appleton. If you have other favorites you’d recommend, share them in our social media comments.

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

Appleton’s restaurants have provided some of my fondest memories from my time at Lawrence, from the evenings going out with friends to indulge in a huge dinner after a rough week, to the blissful satisfying of burger cravings after a couple of hours at the gym. Of course, I haven’t been to every restaurant in Appleton. But I’ve come to appreciate the fare we have right around the corner. These local restaurants are here for you; they’re the moments when you say to yourself, “I deserve this.” So, may this list serve as a guide for your future best memories in Appleton.

#8. Muncheez Pizzeria – 600 W. College Ave.

Muncheez makes the cut for being the closest place to get decent pizza at a decent price. They’ve also been there for me through my late-night hankerings for pizza; they’re open until 3 a.m. all week. What’s not to love about a place that encourages you to eat pizza after midnight? Their menu offers whole pizzas or just by the slice.

Walkable from campus? Yes. It’s about a seven-block hike.

Favorite dish: Veggiefest

#7. Home Burger Bar – 205 W. College Ave.

You can be sure of getting a big, well-cooked burger served on a cute red tray at Home Burger Bar. Here’s two more important words for you: truffle fries. As good as the burgers are, I would stop in just for this trendy appetizer. The service isn’t always great but the food will be quality. Maybe one day I will be brave enough to try the PB&J Bacon burger. One day …

Walkable from campus? Yes. Just a few blocks down College Avenue.

Favorite dish: Steakhouse burger

#6. Culver’s – 3631 E. Calumet St.

Culver’s isn’t unique to Appleton, of course, but I would be remiss if I didn’t bring this Wisconsin-born chain to your attention. This is the place for quality fast food. I go through phases of intense cravings for one of their signature Butterburgers, followed by an amazing chocolate malt. Try the rotating custard Flavor of the Day. Try a Concrete Mixer (custard with candy mix-ins). Try it all. Here’s the menu. No, it’s not health food, but it’s made fresh and it’s good for your soul.

Walkable from campus? No. You’ll need to find some wheels for this one.

Favorite dish: Original Butterburger

#5. Antojitos Mexicanos – 204 E. College Ave.

Yes, you get free warm chips and three kinds of salsa while you wait for your food. If you don’t fill up on that, you have a wide range of dishes to choose from. The menu is huge! I like to inspect it for about 15 minutes and always end up with the fish tacos (go on Tuesdays and get them for $5!) This place gets pretty busy, so going for an early dinner is optimal.

Walkable from campus? Definitely. Just two blocks west of Drew Street.

Favorite dish: Fish tacos

#4. Katsu-Ya – 338 W. College Ave.

As a sushi lover, I am so grateful to have a place like Katsu-Ya right down the street. You can go alone for a light dinner and get a couple rolls of great sushi for pretty cheap. This restaurant also wonderfully caters to social dinners with your friends. I love the group effort of agreeing on which rolls everyone wants, enjoying them together, discussing which ones you liked best and ordering some more. It’s a very rewarding dining experience.

Walkable from campus? Certainly. A six-block hike west on College Avenue.

Favorite dish: Dragon Roll

#3. Harmony Pizza Café – 432 W. Wisconsin Ave.

Harmony Pizza has the best pizza in Appleton, and your patronage supports a local business started by Lawrence alumni. Choose a pizza from their vegan-friendly menu or build your own; it’s all made with locally sourced organic ingredients. The atmosphere doesn’t suffer when it gets busy. Everyone seems to know everyone, and you might run into some professors during your meal.

Walkable from campus? Maybe. It would be a serious walk, north to Wisconsin Avenue and then another eight blocks or so to the west.

Favorite dish: The Beetza

#2. Basil Café – 1513 N. Richmond St.

Basil Café is my favorite among Appleton’s Thai and Vietnamese fare. Your experience starts as soon as you sit down when you get a pitcher of cool, fragrant coconut water at your table while you peruse the menu. Anything you get will hit the spot, from noodle-based soups and salads to curry and stir fry. I cannot wait to try more of what this place has to offer.

Walkable from campus? Probably not. It’s north of Wisconsin on Richmond. May need to find a ride.

Favorite dish: Kow Boon

#1. India Darbar – 2333 W. Wisconsin Ave.

Wow. How do I transcribe the sound of my stomach growling? This is the best Indian food in the area. Just thinking about the menu is making me so hungry. You have to start with nan — garlic and stuffed are my favorites — and from there, just go crazy. There is so much to choose from and you can’t go wrong. Come with a group of friends, decide on a few dishes that look good and share them!

Walkable from campus? No. You’ll want to catch a ride for this one. But well worth the effort.

Favorite dish: All of it

These are just my picks. Have you also had great meals at Appleton’s restaurants? Tell us where in our social media comments.

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Lawrence’s Willa Dworschack named a Goldwater Scholar

Willa Dworschack ’20, a Lawrence University physics major from Soldiers Grove, Wisconsin, has been named a Goldwater Scholar.

Head shot of Willa Dworschack
Willa Dworschack ’20

Dworschack, who is doing research in atomic and molecular optics, is one of 496 undergraduates across the country being honored for their studies in math and science fields.

The program honoring the late Sen. Barry Goldwater was designed to foster and encourage outstanding students to pursue careers in the fields of math, natural sciences and engineering. The Goldwater Scholarship, the preeminent undergraduate award of its type in these fields, is administered by the Goldwater Foundation, a federally endowed agency established in 1986.

“I am thrilled to be honored by the Goldwater Foundation,” Dworschack said. “Lawrence has provided the opportunities to help me perform nationally recognized research, which is instrumental to my successes as an undergraduate.”

Goldwater Scholars have impressive academic and research credentials that garner the attention of prestigious post-graduate fellowship programs.

Dworschack, a junior, is among the 496 college sophomores or juniors selected from across the country. The selections came from a pool of 1,223 natural science, engineering and mathematics students who were nominated by 443 academic institutions to compete for the 2019 Goldwater scholarships. 

“I am grateful for this scholarship that will help support my future and look forward to discovering what opportunities result from becoming a Goldwater Scholar while I continue my study of atomic and molecular optics,” Dworschack said.

The Goldwater announcement comes on the heels of Lawrence students earning prestigious Fulbright and Watson fellowships.

Details here on fellowship and scholarship opportunities at Lawrence.

Meghan Murphy ’19, from Wauwatosa, is one of 41 national recipients of a Watson Fellowship that will provide for a year of independent travel and exploration, studying the violin and violin-like instruments in multiple cultures. See details here.

Milou (Emmylou) de Meij ’19, from Bozeman, Montana, has received a Fulbright U.S. Student Program award. She will teach English in an assistantship position in Latvia during the 2019-20 academic year. A student of both Russian studies and music performance, she is one of more than 2,100 U.S. citizens who will study, conduct research, and teach abroad for the coming academic year through the Fulbright U.S. Student Program.  See details here.

Senegal experience: Students immersed in culture, language during term in Dakar

Dominica Chang and Lawrence students Bronwyn Earthman, Mima Tabishat, Miriam Thew-Forrester, and Greta Wilkening jump in the air at Lac Rose along the Atlantic Ocean just outside of Dakar.
Miriam Thew-Forrester, Tamima Tabishat, Bronwyn Earthman, Greta Wilkening, and Dominica Chang visit Lac Rose along the coast of the Atlantic Ocean just outside of Dakar.

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

For the four Lawrence University students who are studying abroad during spring term in Dakar, Senegal — part of the school’s Francophone Seminar program— the immersion in daily life in the west African country is invaluable.

“All of our courses are either in French or Wolof, and the people around the Baobab Center are always chatting with us and pushing us to learn new phrases in Wolof or French, so we are truly immersed in the language and culture,” said Greta Wilkening ’21.

Accompanied by Dominica Chang, the Margaret Banta Humleker Professor of French Cultural Studies and an associate professor of French, the students are staying with host families, studying at the Baobab Center, being immersed in local customs and languages and working on independent study projects.

We asked Chang to tell us a little about the program and we asked the four students to share their experiences halfway through the 10-week term. Their responses are below.

Dominica Chang, a brief introduction:

“Hello! BonjourAsalaam AlaikumNa nga Def? I teach French at Lawrence and am leading this spring’s Francophone seminar in Dakar, Senegal.

“Lawrence University’s Department of French and Francophone Studies is proud to lead a long-term study abroad experience for students to Dakar, Senegal. This program, which first began in 1996, is unique for many reasons: not only does a member of the department’s faculty accompany students for the entirety of their stay (both teaching French language and taking courses from local instructors with them), but participants experience complete cultural and linguistic immersion in Senegal, a francophone country with deep ties to France but with its own distinctly rich and proud history and culture.

“While in Dakar, The Baobab Center (African Consultants International) is a home base resource center that arranges family home stays and service learning opportunities, provides cultural orientation workshops and language instruction in Wolof, and organizes cultural excursions in Dakar and other cities and villages in Senegal.”

More on the Francophone Seminar program can be found here.

The Lawrence contingent poses for a photo with Gary Engelberg, one of the founders of African Consultants International.
The Lawrence contingent meets with Gary Engelberg (in red shirt), one of the founders of African Consultants International. ACI was founded in 1983. The Lawrence program began in 1996.

Meet the students:

Bronwyn Earthman ’21 is a biology and French major from Minneapolis:

“My host family here in Senegal has been a little bit different than I initially expected because my host mom is in France with her husband getting a medical treatment, and so I have been living with my three host brothers, Lucas, 23, Noel, 15, and Marco, 9. They are the best, and I’ve had a great time hanging out with them!

“The Baobab Center is our home base, where we have all of our classes. It’s about a three-minute walk away from my house, which is so convenient! Africa Consultants International (ACI) was founded in 1983 by Gary Engleberg and Lillian Baer, and its mission is to promote intercultural understanding, social justice, health, and the well-being of the people. The center has two main floors with many classrooms, where we have classes with guest professors from the university, as well as with professors from the center and Dominica. The faculty and staff of ACI are so wonderful and helpful, and are definitely my favorite thing about the center. Every morning when I walk in the building, everyone greets me enthusiastically in Wolof and French, giving me the opportunity to practice both.”

The Lawrence students sit on the floor during a session with an instructor in the Baobab Center in Dakar.
The Lawrence students meet with instructors daily in the Baobab Center in Dakar.

Miriam Thew Forrester ’20 is double-majoring in English and government (international relations) with a French minor:

“My host family lives in the neighborhood of Mermoz. I live with my host mom (Gnagna) on her floor, but her son and his family live on the floor above us so I also have a little brother (Mouhammed) and a baby sister. My house is right on the VDN (one of the main roads in Dakar), so my walk to and from the Baobab Center is always interesting.

“One of my favorite things about Dakar is that there is so much to love; it’s made it almost impossible for me to choose my independent project. I’m primarily interested in identity (and its creation, expression, transformation, transmission, etc.), and Dakar has a seemingly infinite array of possibilities for this. There’s the graffiti, which is not illegal here and incorporates various aspects of Senegalese identity, culture, and traditional art forms while simultaneously pushing cultural norms.

“The mix of the French and Wolof languages (as well as Pulaar and others) in daily life is incredible, and I’m currently beginning to conduct interviews focusing on the impact of language on identity here. Each interaction has offered something new, and I am so excited to continue exploring the culture here.”

Lawrence students get a music lesson from a Dakar instructor.
Music, dance and language instruction are all part of the Senegal program as students are immersed in local culture. The primary languages are French and Wolof.

Tamima Tabishat ’20 is majoring in global studies with a focus on cities and is pursuing a triple minor in French, German, and Arabic language studies.

“I chose to study in Dakar to improve my French-speaking skills and to work on my senior project. During these 10 weeks, I am staying with a host family that lives very close to the center. My host parents, Chantal and Babacar, are very kind and I felt like a part of their home from the very first day. Chantal takes me with her to markets, family gatherings and church services, which have all been very enriching experiences.

“For my service learning project, I have been researching the role of the second-hand clothing market in Senegal and its impacts on local tailors and the textile industry. Over the past few decades, used clothing from the U.S., many European countries, and China have flooded into Senegal by the ton and created an enormous second-hand clothing market where used clothing is sold for a fraction of its original price. Not only is this industry harmful to the environment, but it has destroyed local industries and jobs such as fabric production and tailoring as it has become more affordable for consumers to purchase second-hand items from overseas than locally made garments.

“Over the course of my time in Dakar, I hope to learn more about this global phenomenon through interviews with local tailors, second-hand vendors, fashion designers, and fabric shopkeepers.”

The students pose on a trip to Lac Rose.
The students take numerous excursions, including this one to Lac Rose.

Greta Wilkening ’21 is an environmental studies major with a French minor.

“I live with a host family near the Baobab Center, where I attend class. My family is quite large: about 18 people in total, though neighbors and friends will always drop by at any given time. My host family speaks mainly Wolof, the local language, and they are always helping me learn new phrases in Wolof. Three younger host-siblings are always ready to play with me, even after I return home from a long day of classes.

“At the Baobab Center, we take many different classes throughout the week. We take classes like Senegalese literature and history, political history, contemporary art, Islam in Senegal, Wolof, and music and dance. In music and dance, we are learning to play the kora, a stringed instrument, and are also learning a dance routine that we will perform at the end of the program.”

Follow the Lawrence students’ educational journey in Senegal, including more photos and video, on Facebook @lawrenceinsenegal.

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu