Lawrence named one of the country’s top “Colleges That Pay You Back”

The Princeton Review has named Lawrence University one of the nation’s best colleges for students seeking an exceptional education with great career preparation and at an affordable price.

Princeton-Review_bang-for-Buck_newsblogLawrence was included in the education services company’s 2016 edition of its just released book “Colleges That Pay You Back: The 200 Schools That Give You the Best Bang for Your Tuition Buck.”

Lawrence and UW-Madison were the only two Wisconsin institutions to be included in the book.

The Princeton Review selected the schools based on return on investment (ROI) ratings it tallied for 650 schools last year. The ratings weighted 40 data points that covered everything from academics, cost, and financial aid to graduation rates, student debt, and alumni salaries and job satisfaction.

Lawrence also was included on the book’s sublist of the top 25 Best Schools for Making an Impact, which was based on student ratings and responses to survey questions covering community service opportunities, student government, sustainability efforts and on-campus student engagement.Princeton-Review-Book_newsblog

“One of the things we like about this particular ranking is its heavy emphasis on assessing the return on investment families make,” said Ken Anselment, Lawrence’s dean of admissions and financial aid, “Our student and alumni success shines a bright light on the great things that happen at Lawrence.”

In its profile of Lawrence, The Princeton Review editors cited the college for its “rigorous academic experience” and for extolling “the values of a liberal education as a means by which to build character, think critically, and create opportunities for choice.”

Students surveyed for the book described Lawrence as “a very close-knit community” and Appleton as “a great little town with a lot of good restaurants, bars and cafes.”

In the “Career Information” section of the profile, Lawrence earned an exceptional ROI rating score of 89, with median starting salaries for graduates of $36,400 and median mid-career salaries of $89,500.

Princeton-ReviewBang-for-Buck_newsblog2Schools included in the book “stand out not only for their outstanding academics, but also for their affordability via comparatively low sticker prices and/or generous financial aid to students with need or both” according to Robert Franek, lead author and The Princeton Review’s Senior VP/Publisher.

“Students at these colleges also have access to extraordinary career services programs from their freshman year on, plus a lifetime of alumni connections and post-grad support,” said Franek.

Of the 200 schools profiled in the book, 66 are public and 134 are private. There were also nine tuition-free schools included.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Geologist Marcia Bjornerud named Fellow of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters

Lawrence University geologist Marcia Bjornerud has been named a Fellow of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters for 2016. She is the first Lawrence faculty member to be accorded that honor.

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Marcia Bjornerud

Established in 1981, the Fellows program represents the highest level of recognition conferred by the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters. Drawn from a pool of statewide nominees, Fellows are elected for their extraordinary levels of accomplishment in their fields as well as lifelong commitments to intellectual discourse and public service.

One of 11 new Fellows named to the Academy in perpetuity, Bjornerud will be publicly recognized Sunday, April 17 at an awards ceremony in the Pyle Center on the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus.

Bjornerud, the Walter Schober Professor of Environmental Studies and Professor of Geology at Lawrence, joined the faculty in 1995. Her scholarship focuses on the physics of earthquakes and mountain-building. She combines field-based studies of bedrock geology with quantitative models of rock mechanics. She has conducted research in high arctic Norway (Svalbard) and Canada (Ellesmere Island) as well as mainland Norway, Scotland, New Zealand and the Lake Superior region.

“Marcia Bjornerud is an outstanding member of the Lawrence faculty and a great contributor to the quality of life in Wisconsin,” said Provost David Burrows. “Her election recognizes an important connection between academic research and scholarship and the scientific understanding of Wisconsin’s environment. The election to the Academy is richly deserved and is a symbol of the collaboration between Lawrence and the citizens of Wisconsin.”

Linda Ware, president of the Wisconsin Academy Board of Directors, said the Fellows program is a way to “honor the genuine treasures we have in this state—extraordinary people who show us the best of Wisconsin.”

“Every two years, we scan the state to find its most outstanding and creative people,” said Ware. “As part of our increasingly statewide reach for interdisciplinary excellence, we’re proud to recognize these brilliant and focused citizens who inspire people in Wisconsin and beyond.”

“[Marcia’s] election to the Academy is richly deserved and is a symbol of the collaboration between Lawrence and the citizens of Wisconsin.”
         — Provost David Burrows

The founding director of Lawrence’s program in environmental studies, Bjornerud was named a Fellow of the Geological Society of America in 2003 and twice was named a Fulbright Senior Scholar, first in Norway (2000-2001) and then New Zealand (2009). She was named Outstanding Educator in 2011 by the Association of Women Geoscientists and was recognized with Lawrence’s Excellence in Scholarship or Creative Activity Award in 2007.

She is the author of the 2005 book, “Reading the Rocks: The Autobiography of the Earth,” and is a regular contributing writer to the New Yorker’s science and technology blog.

In 2012, Bjornerud was lead author on a pro bono report for the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission on the geology of the Gogebic Range. The report was designed to serve as a free public document to provide baseline information about the potential effects of an open pit mine on the waters of the Bad River and the wild rice stands in the Kakagon Sloughs.

She earned a bachelor’s degree in geophysics from the University of Minnesota and master’s and doctoral degrees in structural geology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence Artist Series welcomes violinist Rachel Barton Pine Feb. 6

Violinist Rachel Barton Pine brings her dazzling technique and joyous tone to classical and contemporary music Saturday, Feb. 6 in the second concert of Lawrence University’s four-part 2015-16 Artist Series.

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Rachel Barton Pine

The performance, which includes pianist Matthew Hagle, begins at 8 p.m. in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel. Tickets, at $25-30 for adults, $20-25 for seniors and $18-20 for students, are available through the Lawrence Box Office, 920-832-6749.

Praised for her ability to connect with others through her music as a powerful, emotional and dynamic artist, Pine’s performance range spans a wide spectrum. She has appeared as a soloist with many world-renowned ensembles, including the Chicago Symphony, the Philadelphia Orchestra and the Royal Philharmonic. She also has jammed with the likes of Slash of Guns N’ Roses and other rock and metal stars.

Associate Professor Samantha George, who teaches violin in the Lawrence Conservatory, hailed Pine as a “generous and flexible musician.”

“I have been a fan of Rachel Barton Pine’s for many years,” said George. “I am always impressed by her ability to play the most difficult passagework with sophisticated phrasing and gesture.”

George fondly recalled Pine’s versatility during a Chicago concert she attended.

“The first 45 minutes Rachel performed with a small baroque ensemble. Then a full orchestra appeared and she performed as soloist, playing Vivaldi’s ‘Concerto for Four Violins’ and the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto. After a set change, Rachel reappeared with her rock band and sounded fantastic all amped up. I was blown away.”

Pine has recorded more than 25 albums, featuring classical favorites, contemporary artists and neglected historical pieces. Her 2013 CD, “Violin Lullabies,” recorded with Hagle, debuted at number one on the Billboard classical chart.

Last September, Cedille Records released Pine’s recording of “Vivaldi: The Complete Viola D’Amore Concertos with Ars Antigua” while Avie Records will release Pine’s performance of J.S. Bach’s “Six Sonatas and Partitas for Violin” this March. That disc was recorded in the same church in which Pine first heard the music of Bach live, and experience that helped her fall in love with the violin at age three.

“I am always impressed by her ability to play the most difficult passagework with sophisticated phrasing and gesture.”
  — Samantha George

The product of an unstable childhood in a working-class Chicago family, Pine has been called  “indomitable,” in part for her struggles after a horrific train accident which severed her left leg and severely injured her right foot.

For her part, Pine has refused to let those challenges derail her musical career.

“I don’t dwell on what I can’t, so I dwell on what I can do,” she told the Lansing State Journal in January 2016. “I’m a Midwesterner and I believe in hard work. I have red hair and good fingers. I can stand on a stage and play all 24 Paganini Caprices and not many other people can do that.”

In addition to performing, Pine spends her time teaching and helping talented young musicians with their expenses through the Rachel Elizabeth Barton Foundation, which she started in 2011.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

On and off-campus teams successfully defend their titles in 51st annual Lawrence trivia contest

A Foolish Consistency is the Hobgoblins of Little Minds successfully defended its crown, winning its second straight off-campus title in Lawrence University’s 51st Great Midwest Trivia Contest.

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The new Trivia Master’s for next year’s contest get ready to hand out the prizes to the top=finishing teams in this year’s contest.

The North Carolina-based team racked up 1,220 points during the 50-hour contest that ended at midnight Sunday, Jan. 31, to edge Pugnugget and Corn Wars: The Iowans Awaken, which tied for second with 1,205 points. Holy Broman Space Team Presents 2016: A Honda Odyssey finished third with 1,110 points.

A total of 86 off-campus teams competed.

David and the Bucky’s Battallion Diabolically Antagonizing Tortured Brood-Makers, Basically Building Batteries, Bungee Jumping Blindfolded, Bizarrely Bludgeoning Bells and Definitely Ascending toward Brilliance By Dastardly Battling Together ran away with the on-campus title with 1,315, winning its second straight title. Michael Hubbard was a distant second among 18 on-campus teams with 1,101 points while Nipples of Knowledge: The Matriarchy: Ormsbae Trivia Team (The Experience, TM), placed third with 1,075 points.

For their winning efforts, Hobgoblin and Bucky’s were awarded first-place prizes of a box of Andrew Commons cookies and a package of Minion Peeps, respectively.

One team, the Kimberly-based Trivia Pirates…Arrgh, managed to correctly answer the contest’s final, usually impossible “Super Garruda” question: In 1964, a band pretended to play Beatles songs at a battle of the bands called the Letterman Show. What is written in the top right corner of the page that features the band in a KWSS DJ’s copy of the lead singer’s 1965 high school yearbook? The Pirates were the only team to correctly come up with Earwigs Rule.

The contest was not without some controversy. A team that was leading the off-campus scoring, had their point total zeroed out late in the contest by the trivia masters after it was discovered an individual on the team was also playing with an on-campus team and using answered generated by Bucky’s for the off-campus team.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Trivia Time: Lawrence sets the bar when it comes to all things obscure, inconsequential

It wasn’t so much “playing” Lawrence University’s Great Midwest Trivia Contest as a freshman in 2013 that got Jon Hanrahan hooked on the college’s 50-hour minutia marathon.

It was taking a break from answering questions to answering phones at Action Central that turned him into a contest die-hard.

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Grand Master Jon Hanrahan (center) and his fellow trivia master’s will oversee the 51st edition of Lawrence’s 50-hour Great Midwest Trivia Contest Jan. 29-31.

“After playing for several hours for Plantz Hall’s legendary Morgan Freeman team, I went to the WLFM studios and spent just as much time answering phones that first year,” said the senior from Johnsburg, Ill. “I remember being thrown off by all the clamor and the commotion, but I also remember thinking, ‘this was something I needed to experience first hand.’”

From humble phone answerer, Hanrahan has risen to become the Grand Master of this year’s contest, the exalted overseer of the 51st edition of the country’s oldest ongoing salute to all-things insignificant.

As per custom, the contest kicks off precisely at 37 seconds after 10 p.m., Friday, Jan. 29 and runs continuously through midnight Sunday, Jan. 31. As it has since 2006, the contest will be webcast worldwide on the Internet at wlfmradio.lawrence.edu.

Questions are asked in three-minute intervals, with teams calling in answers to a bank of a dozen or more phones staffed by volunteers in the WLFM studios.

Last year’s celebratory 50th contest attracted 65 off-campus teams and 29 on-campus teams, with similar numbers expected for this year’s edition.

Orchestrating 50 straight hours of the most complex, unGoogleable questions is not a task Hanrahan takes lightly, even though the contest’s long-standing credo is basically to have fun. Helping him maintain some degree of sanity while overseeing a largely insane endeavor will be 12 hand-picked trivia masters.

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Volunteers will be busy answering phones and recording correct answers in the WLFM studios during Lawrence’s 2016 Great Midwest Trivia Contest.

“I have spent many nights staying awake, mulling over detail after little detail,” said Hanrahan, who counts his selection as this year’s Grand Master as one of the “disproportionally” proudest moments of his young life. “The contest is a vast and complex beast. I’ve had at least three dreams about trivia and in each one I had to tend to something that I forgot or didn’t foresee.

“I really trust my co-masters to run an entertaining and relatively stress-free contest,” he added. “I’m excited about their ideas and their somewhat oddball perspectives. We’re all going to push ourselves to write creative questions that really stretch the possibilities of what a Lawrence trivia question can feel like.”

Since making its debut in 1966 as an alternative to an off-campus academic trip known as “Encampment,” where select students went off to discuss esoteric topics with professors, Lawrence’s Great Midwest Trivia Contest has nurtured friendships and sparked romances — at least one set of trivia teammates became husband and wife — while spawning second and even third generation trivia devotees from among the original players.

Haranhan credits the trivia contest’s enduring popularity to Lawrence’s non-traditional “good, smart student.”

“As Lawrentians, we like to follow our passions, but we also tend to want to mess with things,” said Hanrahan, a piano performance major. “Trivia is that chance to be messily intellectual and creative. Do the answers to any of our 400-plus questions really matter? Usually, no. But for some reason, the players keep searching. By the time the weekend is over, the questions and the answers will drift away and yet, because of it all, we will have had a chance to see just about every nook and cranny that exists in the world. And we will have left our strange, ambitious mark.”

While Hanrahan hints at a few new twists up his Grand Master sleeve, he’s not about to reveal any of his plans in advance. It goes without saying, though, no one will be able to answer a single question off the top of their head.

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Concentration and great search abilities are useful skills during Lawrence’s 50-hour tribute to all things trivial.

“Even if someone is not aligned with any particular team or if someone is able to only answer one question correctly the entire weekend, we’ll do our best to make the listening itself entertaining,” said Hanrahan, who hopes to pursue a career in radio after graduation.

Following trivia tradition, Lawrence’s president, in this case Mark Burstein, will start the fun by asking the contest’s first question, which, again by tradition, is always the final question — the virtually impossible “Super Garruda” — from the previous year’s contest.

While it proved to be a stumper last year, it should be an easy “get” right out of the gate for every team this time around. To wit: Near property previously owned by Rockwell Lime Company is a manhole built in 1921 with an 8-inch diameter pipe leading downstream 226 feet. What is the manhole label and what is written on the cover of the manhole?

Surely written in notebooks and special files all over campus and around town is the answer “15-47” “Richards Iron Wks” (works).

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence establishing leadership position for spiritual and religious life

Tom and Julie Hurvis met in the late 1950s as undergraduates at Lawrence University. She devoted her life to people, especially those in need, and enthusiastic advocacy of the Bahá’í faith’s vision of a unified and peaceful world.

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Julie Esch Hurvis ’61 and Tom Hurvis ’60

In her memory, Tom Hurvis has made a generous gift to Lawrence for the establishment of the Julie Esch Hurvis Dean of Spiritual and Religious Life, which will continue her legacy with countless generations of students, faculty and staff.

Julie, who passed away last July, was a 1961 Lawrence graduate while Tom graduated in 1960.

As devoted members of the Bahá’í faith, the Hurvises strongly believed in the power of spirituality. They embraced the wisdom of `Abdu’l-Bahá, the son of the religion’s founder and its one-time leader, who once said, “Man is, in reality, a spiritual being and only when he lives in the spirit is he truly happy.”

Designed to further enhance the transformative experience a Lawrence education provides, the new leadership position will be dedicated to reinforcing a welcoming and supportive community environment for spiritual and religious exploration and expression.

The gift will endow the position and its related programming in perpetuity. A national candidate search to fill the new position will begin immediately.

“Julie Hurvis’ impact on Lawrence can be felt on this campus every day,” said President Mark Burstein. “She cared deeply about every student and worked to ensure they succeeded at the university. Our inaugural dean of spiritual and religious life will not only help ensure that success but also will be a reminder of Julie’s life, values and care for the individual. I am grateful to Tom and Julie for creating this legacy and caring so deeply about our students.”

The focus of the dean’s position will include education, student support and mentoring, campus programs, enhancing connections to the religious communities of the Fox Cities, and campus spiritual leadership.

“Lawrence strives to meet the intellectual and developmental needs of students, however, for many students, their needs include spiritual support,” said Nancy Truesdell, vice president for student affairs. “The Julie Esch Hurvis Dean of Spiritual and Religious Life will be an important resource for those students. We’ll also be able to provide a location where they can have conversations about faith and their personal values as well as a space for reflection or prayer.”

A leadership position dedicated to the spiritual and religious needs of the campus community has been discussed for several years, sparked by research Truesdell conducted while on sabbatical leave in 2010 as well as campus climate surveys completed by students. More recent conversations she had with a wide range of campus constituents underscored a need to strengthen the college’s support of students of faith.

“Julie Hurvis’ impact on Lawrence can be felt on this campus every day. Our inaugural dean of spiritual and religious life will not only help ensure that success but also will be a reminder of Julie’s life, values and care for the individual.”
    — President Mark Burstein

The dean will serve as a senior campus leader, collaborating with individual students and groups, faculty, staff, local clergy and community organizations to offer support in the exploration of spirituality, religion and morality. The new position will provide a resource and counselor during moments of tragedy and crisis, working with the campus community to provide opportunities for meaningful ceremonies and celebrations for a range of religions and interfaith services.

Student Kathryn Bellile feels the new dean “will be an important voice on campus to advocate for students of faith.”

“A dean could be a great support for faith-based organizations on campus, helping them to engage with the life of the university and helping to get students involved in faith communities if they haven’t found their way to one,” said Bellile, a senior from Appleton and a member of the college’s Lawrence Christian Fellowship organization. “Investing in this position shows a thoughtful concern for the needs of students of faith and an interest in broadening our definition of diversity to include people who hold different convictions and beliefs.

Main Hall_Spiritual Dean_newsblog“For students of faith, their religion may be the most important aspect of their life and identity,” added Bellile. “This will send a message to current and future students that their faith is recognized by the Lawrence community and that the campus is willing to accept and support that part of who they are. They don’t have to check their convictions at the door to participate fully in the community we have here.”

Long-time faculty member Steven Jordheim called the new dean’s position “a transformative moment in the life of our university.”

“The creation of the position of dean of spiritual and religious life demonstrates Lawrence’s commitment to the spiritual wholeness and wellness of all students, faculty and staff,” said Jordheim, professor of music, who joined the Lawrence conservatory in 1981. “The presence of the dean on our campus and the support, mentoring and programming available through this new office will facilitate important dialogue and understanding regarding various religious and spiritual beliefs, practices and experiences within a context of mutual support and respect.”

The Hurvis gift also will support a new campus spiritual and religious center, providing students, faculty and staff space to explore, learn, worship and connect on issues of spirituality and religion. The center will be created through a renovation of an existing campus building, with capacity for updates to meet future needs.

A native of Sheboygan, Julie Hurvis was a life-long enthusiast of Wisconsin’s scenic beauty. Gifted with a strong visual sense, she earned a bachelor’s degree from Lawrence in studio art and later earned a bachelor of fine arts degree from the Art Institute of Chicago.

She took great pride in the countless lives she touched throughout the Chicago area, especially those she had an impact on through 40 years of continuous service as a member of the Glenview (Ill.) Spiritual Assembly, the annually elected body stewarding Bahá’í’s activities in the village.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Change in golf status to have athletic department-wide benefits

Following a thorough review, a recommendation from the Intercollegiate Athletics Committee and with the endorsement of the faculty, President Mark Burstein has announced a change in the status of the Lawrence men’s golf team from varsity to club, effective fall of 2016.

As a result, more students — women as well as men — will have expanded opportunities to represent the college on the links and participate in this lifelong activity.

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Mike Szkodzinski

“While no one enjoys decisions as difficult as changing a program’s status, we are confident we are making this change in the best interest of our student-athletes,” said Mike Szkodzinski, director of athletics and a member of the Intercollegiate Athletics Committee.

A reallocation of resources that could enhance the experience Lawrence provides to its more than 300 varsity student-athletes was among the primary factors in the decision to change the golf program’s status.

Among the advantages of the resource reallocation will be the addition of a full-time strength and conditioning coach to the athletic department that will benefit all varsity athletes.

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Erin Buenzli

“It is essential for our student-athletes to have the opportunity to train with a professional,” said Szkodzinski. “Having a full-time strength and conditioning coach who will work with all of the athletes in and out of their playing seasons will be a tremendous asset to our entire program.”

Erin Buenzli, Lawrence’s director of wellness and recreation, will serve as the director of the golf team. She sees the change as a positive that will “create additional opportunities for Lawrentians to enjoy and learn golf.”

“The move allows more students to participate and create an inclusive, co-ed golf team while taking on leadership roles within the club to create the student-driven experience that they envision,” said Buenzli.

“Having a full-time strength and conditioning coach who will work with all of the athletes in and out of their playing seasons will be a tremendous asset to our entire program.”
Mike
Szkodzinski, director of athletics

As a club team, Lawrence will have the opportunity to compete against other club programs in the state and be affiliated with the National Collegiate Club Golf Association North Region, which sponsors two regional tournaments in the fall and spring. Other institutions in Wisconsin with club golf teams include Beloit College, Marquette University, UW-Green Bay, UW-Madison, UW-Milwaukee, UW-Oshkosh, UW-Platteville, UW-Stevens Point and UW-Whitewater.

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Kathy Privatt

“This outcome seemed the most rational, responsible use of the resources entrusted to the athletics department and the best use in support of our student-athletes,” said Kathy Privatt, chair of the Intercollegiate Athletics Committee, Lawrence’s faculty representative to the Midwest Conference and the James G. and Ethel M. Barber Professor of Theatre and Drama. “We acknowledged that, given the time commitment of Conservatory students, our actual pool of available student-athletes is approximately 1,200.  With that population and the current budget, we determined that there are a limited number of sports we can sustain appropriately.”

Even with the change in golf’s status, Lawrence still has the third most (21) intercollegiate varsity sports among the 11 members of the Midwest Conference.

A national search for a strength and conditioning coach will begin immediately.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

The beauty of patterns featured in latest Wriston Art Center exhibition

The combined work of five nationally recognized artists will be featured in the new Wriston Art Center Galleries exhibition “An Unnamed Need: Pattern and Beauty in Contemporary Art.”

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Anila Quayyum Agha: “Rights of Passage”, embroidery, screen printing, graphite drawing and beads on paper, 2011.

The exhibition opens Friday, Jan. 15 with a reception at 6 p.m. and runs through March 13. The exhibition and reception is free and open to the public.

Following a decade-long national trend of new works of unabashed beauty, the five artists — Anila Quayyum Agha, Jennifer Angus, Michelle Grabner, Heather McGill and Tony Orrico — have used patterns to create stunning visuals that explore the many intersections of beauty and craft.

Held in all three of Wriston’s galleries, the exhibition features works that challenge the mind while delighting the eye. Celebrating beauty’s many forms, the artists collectively examine complex cultural themes, including ethnic identity, gender and humans’ relationship with the natural world.

A Wisconsin native, Grabner curated the 2014 Whitney Biennial while Agha won the 2014 Public Vote Grand Prize at ArtPrize, the radically open, international art competition held in Grand Rapids, Mich. Angus, who will deliver an artist’s talk Feb. 19 on biodiversity, conservation and art, has earned national acclaim for her 2015 installation in the Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery.

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Michelle Grabner: “Untitled,” flashe and gesso on canvas, 2014.

As part of the exhibition’s opening, Orrico will perform the final installment of his Penwald 1: 1 Circle series, which features bilateral drawings in which he explores the use of his body as a tool of measurement to inscribe geometries through movement and course. During the 25-minute performance, Orrico will create 1,000 marks with graphite sticks on paper while lying prone.

The exhibition was curated by Lawrence faculty members Rob Neilson, Frederick R. Layton Professor of Art and associate professor of art, and Benjamin Tilghman, assistant professor of art history.

Wriston Art Center Gallery hours are Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday noon – 4 p.m.;  closed Mondays. For more information, 920-832-6621.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.         

 

Lawrence hosts 25th annual community celebration of MLK’s life, legacy

Although Lawrence University classes won’t be held Jan. 18 on the holiday honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., more than 300 students will make it “a day on, not a day off” by engaging in 18 community service projects.

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Lawrence students have embraced the annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday as a day of community engagement and service.

Lawrentians will spend part of their day volunteering their time and talents on activities ranging from painting a rock climbing wall at Appleton’s Edison Elementary School to leading interactive projects that incorporate themes of equality, advocacy and the civil rights movement at the Boys and Girls Club of the Fox Valley.

Highlighting the day will be the community celebration of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King at 6:30 p.m. in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel. The annual commemoration of King’s life and legacy is jointly presented by Lawrence University and the community organization Celebrate Diversity Fox Cities, with the support of The Post-Crescent, numerous Fox Valley organizations, churches and individuals.

Stansbury Theatre in the adjacent Music-Drama Center will be equipped with a video screen to accommodate overflow crowd should the Chapel reach capacity. The event is free and open to the public and a sign language interpreter will be present.

The theme for this year’s celebration is “Breaking the Chains of Injustice.” Social justice icon, scholar and author Dr. Angela Davis will deliver the event’s keynote address.

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Dr. Angela Davis

As a student, writer, scholar and activist/organizer, Davis has devoted much of her life to social justice movements domestically and internationally. Most recently, the Birmingham, Ala., native has focused largely on social problems associated with incarceration and the generalized criminalization of those communities that are most affected by poverty and racial discrimination.

“I am looking forward to hearing Dr. Davis’ call to action for our community at the annual celebration,” said Kathy Flores, the diversity coordinator for the City of Appleton and chairperson of the MLK planning committee. “Many people forget what a radical Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was considered in his time on this earth. I am confident that Dr. Davis will inspire and challenge us to remember and embrace the true legacy of Dr. King.”

In 1970, Davis was placed on the FBI’s “Ten Most Wanted List.” She spent 18 months in jail and on trial before being acquitted by a jury. Davis has drawn on those experiences as an author of 10 books, including 2005’s “Abolition Democracy” and 2003’s “Are Prisons Obsolete?” in which she argues for “decarceration.”

Her just released book, “Freedom is a Constant Struggle: Ferguson, Palestine and the Foundations of a Movement,” is a collection of essays, speeches and interviews highlighting the relationships among historical and contemporary state violence and oppression in the world. It will be used as the next installment in the Fox Cities’ Books Build Community series.

Davis, who studied at Brandeis University and the Sobornne in Paris, has spent the past 15 years at the University of California, Santa Cruz where she is Distinguished Professor Emerita of History of Consciousness and of Feminist Studies.

Her career as an educator and scholar has seen Davis teach at San Francisco State University, Mills College, University of California Berkeley, Vassar College and Stanford University, among others.

“I am confident that Dr. Davis will inspire and challenge us to remember and embrace the true legacy of Dr. King.”
— Kathy Flores, Appleton diversity coordinator

The community celebration also will recognize Tony Awofeso with the annual Jane LaChapelle McCarty Community Leader Award and Ben Vogel with the MLK Educator Award.

A former Outagamie County Board Supervisor, Awofeso is the current president of B.A.B.E.S., Inc., a child abuse prevention program, and former chair of the organization Towards Community: Unity In Diversity (the precursor to Celebrate Diversity Fox Cities). He co-founded African Heritage, Inc. and has served on the boards of the North East Wisconsin Fair Housing Council and CAP Services.

Vogel is the assistant superintendent of school/student services for the Appleton Area School District. He has been an advocate on social injustice issues pervading the school and community cultures with a focus on closing the opportunity gap between African American K-12 and white K-12 students.

Four local students winners of the annual MLK essay contest — Eliana Brenn, Sydni Wanty, Ndemazea Fonkem and Michayla Kading — will read their winning entries as part of the celebration.

The celebration will include music by Anthony Gonzalez, Lawrence student B-Lilly, members of the Lawrence Black Student Union and a spoken word performance by members of Lawrence’s Slam Poetry Club.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence student musicians win national opera competition

Seven Lawrence University students wowed a judging panel of professionals with an eight-minute scene from Mozart’s “Marriage of Figaro” to earn first-place honors in the recent Collegiate Opera Scenes Competition.

Opera-competition-winners_newsblog
Lawrence students were all smiles after winning the Collegiate Opera Scenes Competition. Showing off their first-place plaque are (front row, l. to r.) Katie Mueller, Kayla Siembieda and director of opera studies Copeland Woodruff. Back row (l. to r.): Mitchell Kasprzyk, Derrick Hahn (accompanist), Jackson Rosenberry, Josh Eidem and Paul Gutmann.

Held Jan. 7 at the Conrad Hotel in downtown Indianapolis, Ind., the competition was part of a national joint convention of the National Opera Association and the National Association of Teachers of Singing.

Six singers, all seniors — Josh Eidem, Paul Gutmann, Mitchell Kasprzyk, Katie Mueller, Jackson Rosenberry and Kayla Siembieda —  and junior Derrick Hahn as accompanist on piano, performed the Act III sextet from “Figaro” in front of an audience of more than 300 that included directors, educators and international artists, among them legendary operatic stars George Shirley, Esther Hinds, Thomas Young, and Donnie Ray Albert.

“The convention and competition was a wonderful opportunity for our students to step outside their bubble and see where they stand in relation to their peers,” said Copeland Woodruff, director of opera studies at Lawrence. “It also afforded them the opportunity to perform for and meet opera professionals, colleagues and educators, who helped them understand what a tightly knit community the opera world is. They received valuable feedback and audience response, including that from well-respected, graduate school educators with their eyes on potential students.

“And,” Woodruff added, “it helped us showcase what amazing talent we have here at Lawrence.”

Selected on the basis of a submitted video, Lawrence was one of just five finalists chosen to perform in Division I of the competition. Lawrence competed against performers from DePauw University, Kennesaw State University, Michigan State University and Sam Houston State University.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.