Two Academy of Music Girl Choir singers to represent Wisconsin at national convention

A pair of singers from the Lawrence Academy of Music Girl Choir will represent Wisconsin at the 2016 “Let Freedom SING!” Girlchoir National Convention.

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Elena Anderla

Elena Anderla of Appleton and Haley Corcoran of Kaukauna will serve as singer delegates at the six-day choral festival July 24-29 in Philadelphia. The festival will be held at the same time in the same city as the Democratic National Convention.

“The fact that these two conventions are taking place at the same time is no coincidence,” said Steven Fisher, founder and artistic director of the “Let Freedom SING!” festival. “In presidential election seasons, I, like most Americans, grow weary of partisan politics dividing us as a country. It seemed like a perfect opportunity to showcase choral music and its extraordinary ability to quite literally unite all 50 states.”

Convention organizers asked only one youth choir from each state to send delegates to the convention according to Karen Bruno, director of the Academy of Music, artisitic director of the Girl Choir program and conductor of the Girl Choir Bel Canto singers.

“We are honored to know that our Girl Choir program has been recognized nationally for its outstanding musicianship, and thrilled that two of our singers have the opportunity to participate in this unique event,” said Bruno.

Anderla, a senior Xavier High School, has been a member of the Lawrence Academy Girl Choir for eight years.

“I’m honored to have been chosen for this amazing experience to sing with new voices and a new director in Philadelphia for a week,” said Anderla. “This convention will be a great way to show the country that music truly has the power to unite us despite our many different backgrounds.”

“We are honored to know that our Girl Choir program has been recognized nationally for its outstanding musicianship, and thrilled that two of our singers have the opportunity to participate in this unique event.”
— Karen Bruno

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Haley Corcoran

Corcoran, who has sung with the Girl Choir program the past six years, is a junior at Kaukauna High School.

“Music is a big part of my life and I am honored to be selected to represent Wisconsin at the convention,” said Corcoran. “I am most looking forward to meeting new people who share the same passions as I do. I’m sure this will be the highlight of my high school music career. I I’m excited for this opportunity.”

Like all of the singer delegates, Anderla and Corcoran will need to learn a repertoire of 10 songs before they arrive in Philadelphia. In addition to a culminating “Let Freedom SING!”  concert on July 27 at Arcadia University, Anderla and Corcoran will participate in other “pop up” performance at historic sites throughout Philadelphia.

“It will be a magical choral moment at the opening of the convention when these young women get to hear for the first time what 50 states singing together sounds like,” said Fisher. “As a founder of an organization that aims to transform the lives of young people through the power of making music together, I’m keenly aware of how choral music empowers young women in a unique way when they have the opportunity to make it surround by other girls, helping them to develop into strong, confident women who are at the ready to literally let their voices be heard.”

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Lawrence earns gold, silver awards in annual CASE competition for student recruitment publications

For the second year in a row, Lawrence University earned gold honors in the annual Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) Circle of Excellence competition.CASE-Gold-Winner-badge

Lawrence was awarded honors for its recruitment package of brochures entitled “The Power of Engaged Learning at Lawrence University” and its student recruitment mailer “Don’t Just Finish. Flourish.

CASE awards recognize superior accomplishments that have lasting impact, demonstrate the highest level of professionalism and deliver exceptional results.

“I’m thrilled to be recognized for our recruitment materials,” said Craig Gagnon, associate vice president of communications, who oversaw the publications’ production. “The awards not only recognize outstanding design and execution, but also the consistent application of our positioning strategy in a creative concept that extends throughout all our admissions materials.

“Of course, the ultimate goal is not to win awards but to reinforce the Lawrence reputation and attract applications from qualified students,” Gagnon added. “The fact that we set a record for applications is compelling evidence that we have a message that resonates with our prospective students.”

Lawrence enjoyed a 20 percent increase in applications after launching the package, setting an institutional record.CASE Award_newsblog

CASE judges noted that, “the brochures each promote a single strong message…headlines clearly differentiate between a passive education and the active, engaged learning experience provided at Lawrence.”

Judges also noted, “the package was also budget-friendly; with writing and design done in-house, costs were limited to printing and postage.”

The award-winning publications were the result of a collaborative effort between the communications and admissions offices. In addition to Gagnon, who conducted and analyzed the research that led to the campaign concept, art director Matt Schmeltzer designed the multi-piece program, Ken Anselment, dean of admissions and financial aid, wrote the majority of the body copy and Lawrence photographers Liz Boutelle and Rachel Crowl provided campus images.

The 2016 CASE competition attracted a record 3,350 entries from 713 higher education U.S. and international institutions. Winners are selected by peer professionals as well as professionals from outside of education.

Lawrence won a Grand Gold award, CASE’s highest honor, in 2015 in the general information video category for “The Rabbit’s Nose,” a spoken-word piece, written and performed by 2014 graduate Shea Love and produced by Crowl.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Milwaukee-Downer College legacy honored, preserved in renamed building

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The one-time Jason Downer Commons now bears the name of long-time Milwaukee-Downer College trustee and benefactor Alice G. Chapman.

Lawrence University’s deep connections to Milwaukee-Downer College will be strengthened further by honoring Alice G. Chapman, a long-time trustee and benefactor of the former all-women’s college.

The original Jason Downer Commons, currently known as the Hurvis Center, is being renamed Alice G. Chapman Hall.

Located on the east end of campus, Chapman Hall is home to the Lawrence admissions office, the career center, the alumni and constituency engagement office and the film studies program.

“Renaming our building Alice G. Chapman Hall will underscore the valued connection between Lawrence University and the historic Milwaukee-Downer campus,” said Stacy Mara, associate vice president for development.

Highlighting the building is the beautifully hand-carved Alice Chapman Room, also known as the Teakwood Room. It was originally built by American artist and architect Lockwood de Forest in Chapman’s Milwaukee home and used as a music room. After Chapman died in 1935, the Teakwood Room was placed in Chapman Library on the Milwaukee-Downer campus in 1938 and used for receptions, poetry readings and chamber music.

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The Teakwood Room, a distinctive feature of the Milwaukee-Downer College campus, was moved to Lawrence after the 1964 consolidation and is now on the second floor of Chapman Hall.

When the consolidation was announced, members of the Milwaukee-Downer community asked that their beloved room be preserved. The room was carefully disassembled and stored in a warehouse until 1968 when it was reassembled at Lawrence in Downer Commons.

“The Chapman name has long been associated with Milwaukee Downer College and it is significantly fitting to reunite Chapman Hall and the Teakwood Room to perpetuate Downer at Lawrence,” said Marlene Widen, a 1955 Milwaukee-Downer graduate and 2013 recipient of the university’s Presidential Award for exemplary leadership and actions have contributed to the betterment of the entire Lawrence community. “Chapman Hall will serve as the east anchor to another beloved part of Downer, the recreated Hawthornden on the west end of campus.”

Born in Boston in 1853, Alice Greenwood Chapman grew up in Milwaukee, where her father, T. A. Chapman, ran Chapman’s Department Store. She attended Milwaukee Female College, a predecessor of Milwaukee-Downer, and served on Milwaukee-Downer’s Board of Trustees from 1906 until her death.

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Alice G. Chapman

Known as “an ardent lover of music,” Alice Chapman was an accomplished musician who also enjoyed composing. She was active with a numerous civic groups, including the Milwaukee Institute of Arts, the Visiting Nurses Association and the Children’s Hospital.

Chapman was a generous benefactor for Milwaukee-Downer, including a bequest that funded a new library building. After the consolidation with Lawrence, the Chapman Library became Chapman Hall and is now the Office of the Chancellor at UW-Milwaukee.

Originally completed in 1968, Downer Commons, which served as the campus’ primary dining center for 40 years, was named in honor of Judge Jason Downer, an associate justice of the Wisconsin Supreme Court from 1864-1867. He served as the president of the board of trustees (1866-1871; 1874-1878) for Wisconsin Female College in Fox Lake, a predecessor to Milwaukee-Downer College. When Downer died, he left a gift of $65,000 to the college and its name was changed to Downer College.

When the Warch Campus Center opened in 2009 and dining services moved there, Downer Commons was remodeled to accommodate offices and a state-of-the-art production studio for the university’s newly expanded film studies program, which was supported by a generous gift from the Hurvis family and the Caerus Foundation.

“Lawrence is exceedingly grateful for the Hurvis family’s flexibility in allowing us to make this name change,” said Mara. “Alice Chapman’s famous Teakwood Room has remained a constant fixture and notable highlight on campus throughout the life of the building. Alumni from Lawrence and Milwaukee-Downer associate the building with our Milwaukee-Downer history because of this special room.”

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A production studio is part of the Hurvis Film Studies Center in the lower level of Chapman Hall.

According to Mara, Lawrence will recognize the generosity and dedication of the Hurvis family and the Caerus Foundation by continuing to associate the Hurvis family name with the film studies program, which was their original intent, but not the building itself. The southeast portion of Chapman Hall that houses the film studies program will display the name “Hurvis Film Studies Center” on the outside of the building, with additional Hurvis Film Studies Center signage inside.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Welcome Back: Lawrence Reunion celebrates its graduates, honors five alumni

Nancy Mattson put her Lawrence University degree in economics to such good use, she earned recognition from the United States Navy.

Her work in 1987 as a financial advisor on a $3 billion vessel financing program for the U.S. Navy earned her one of the few Distinguished Public Service Awards bestowed by the Secretary of the Navy during the Reagan Administration.

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Nancy Mattson ’76

Mattson is one of five Lawrence graduates who will be honored Saturday, June 18 as part of the university’s annual alumni Reunion celebration. Each will be recognized at the Reunion Convocation at 10:30 a.m. in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel. The event is free and open to the public.

More than 1,000 alumni and guests from 43 states and five countries, including India, Italy and Romania, representing classes as early as 1940, are expected to return to campus.

Members of the Lawrence 50-Year Connection, a cohort of alumni who graduated at least 50 years ago, get Reunion activities started Wednesday evening June 15 with a reception and dinner and a series of panel presentations and small-group discussions on Thursday, June 16. A complete schedule of Reunion activities can be found here.

The 2016 awards and recipients are:

• Lucia Russell Briggs Distinguished Achievement Award — Nancy Mattson, Class of 1976, Novato, Calif. The award recognizes a Lawrence or Milwaukee-Downer graduate of more than 15 years for outstanding career achievement. The award honors the second president of Milwaukee-Downer College, one of the most beloved and influential figures in that college’s history.

 With more than has more than 35 years of commercial and investment banking experience, Mattson is the founder, managing director, executive vice president and chief financial officer of Argent Group Ltd., a boutique investment banking firm.

Prior to founding Argent in 1982, Mattson spent three years as a vice president with Bank of America. An expert in maritime finance, she has served as a member of the shipbuilding subcommittee of U.S. Marine Transportation System National Advisory Council for the U.S. Department of Transportation.

“I’m fond of saying Lawrence was a great place to ‘grow up,’” said Mattson. “Lawrence gave me the academic background I needed to succeed in my business career.  The liberal arts focus of the university meant that I was exposed to courses that I would not study in depth, but the study of which would enrich my life.

“Lawrence clearly helped me build a firm foundation for life and I believe that it is continuing to do the same for today’s Lawrentians,” Mattson added. “I am grateful to have had the opportunity to attend this truly outstanding university.”

After graduating from Lawrence, Mattson earned an MBA from the John M. Olin School of Business at Washington University, which recognized her with a distinguished alumni award in 1995.

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Curien Kurrien ’01

• Nathan M. Pusey Young Alumni Distinguished Achievement Award — Curien Kurrien, Class of 2001, Mumbai, India. The award recognizes Lawrence alumni of 15 years or less for significant contributions to, and achievements in, a career field. The award honors the 10th and youngest president of Lawrence and an exemplary figure in higher education in the 20th century.

In 2008, Kurrien became an important footnote within the vast publication empire of Condé Nast. At the age of 29, launched GQ India, becoming the youngest editor-in-chief in the publishing titan’s history. Since making its debut eight years ago, Kurrien has built the magazine into India’s leading men’s media brand.

Prior to heading GQ India, he worked as a reporter for The Indian Express, a daily newspaper. He also covered the music and nightlife scene for Time Out Mumbai magazine and wrote for Reuters, the international wire service, which brought his stories to The New York Times and Washington Post, among others.

“I only began to fully understand the value of my Lawrence education as a senior, when I magically started connecting the dots between ostensibly disparate fields, drawing from each discipline to strengthen my arguments in another,” Kurrien said. “These insights imbued me with precious confidence I’d never possessed before – a powerful force that I draw upon daily for my complex, creative, nuanced job as editor-in-chief of GQ India.”

“I returned home a year after I graduated,” Kurrien added. “By then the Lawrence liberal arts ideal had transformed and armed me with a unique outlook that allowed me to identify and capitalize on a range of opportunities in the new India.”

Kurrien earned a degree in government from Lawrence in 2001 and a post-graduate certificate in journalism from New York University.

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Timothy Burnside ’02

• The George B. Walter Service to Society Award — Timothy Anne Burnside, Class of 2002, Washington, D.C. The award recognizes an alumnus or alumna of Lawrence or Milwaukee-Downer who best exemplifies the ideals of a liberal education through its application to socially useful ends in the community, the nation or the world. This award honors George B. Walter ’36, faculty member, coach and dean of men, whose work at the college and beyond was guided by his conviction that every individual can and should make a positive difference in the world.

As a museum specialist at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, Burnside works with musicians, artists and others to build collections and develop exhibitions that offer complex representations of history and cultural expression.

She began her career in 2003 at the National Museum of American History where she launched that museum’s hip-hop collecting initiative. Among the numerous Smithsonian projects she has worked on was an exhibition on Harlem’s Apollo Theater. Burnside regularly presents at conferences and serves on the executive committee of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music.

“I’m lucky to have a career that combines the three things I studied at Lawrence, which I am grateful for every single day,” said Burnside. “I carry every life lesson and classroom experience from Lawrence with me, because those moments taught me how to be confident and not afraid of striving to do the work that I love.

“I learned humility and the importance of working towards a goal because of the good work being done, not because you would be rewarded. I came away from those four years without a plan for the rest of my life, but I knew that I would be ok.”

After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in English from Lawrence, Burnside earned a master’s degree in museum studies at Johns Hopkins University.

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Betty Barrett M-D ’55

• Gertrude Breithaupt Jupp Outstanding Service Award — Betty Barrett, Milwaukee-Downer Class of 1955, Macomb, Ill., and William Hochkammer, Class of 1966, Bloomfield Hills, Mich. The award recognizes an alumnus or alumna of Lawrence or Milwaukee-Downer after his/her 15th Cluster Reunion who has provided outstanding service to Lawrence. It honors Gertrude Breithaupt Jupp, voted Milwaukee-Downer alumna of the year in 1964 for her long-standing service to the college as president of the alumnae association board, class secretary and public relations officer.

Barrett has worked tirelessly to sustain the Milwaukee-Downer legacy after the former all-women’s college consolidated with Lawrence in 1964. Through the Betty Heistad Barrett Fund for Excellence in Civic Service, which she established with her late husband in 2010, Lawrence students are empowered to improve the world, grow as young professionals and explore the nonprofit sector.

Barrett has served on the Lawrence Alumni Association Board of Directors, numerous reunion committees and as a member of a working group for Lawrence’s 2005-11 More Light! campaign.

“‘With a heart full of love for our college’ is a line from the Milwaukee-Downer College alma mater that never fails to bring tears, even 62 years after the merger that formed Lawrence University,” said Barrett. “Downer lives on in the hearts and minds of its devoted alumnae. I am grateful that many of our traditions continue, most visibly the class colors.”

“Lawrence’s liberal arts program, fine professors, individualized education and small size  all make it a fine choice for many students,” Barrett added. “I appreciate coming to Lawrence to meet those students who are successors to me and my classmates. Milwaukee-Downer College lives on through these students.”

After earned a bachelor’s degree at M-D, Barrett earned a master’s degree in government from Marshall University.

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William Hochkammer ’66

Hochkammer, a health care attorney and partner in the Detroit law firm Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn LLP, served 22 years on Lawrence’s Board of Trustees, including as board chairman from 2005-07. He was recently re-elected to the board, becoming the first trustee in Lawrence history to complete his term limit and be invited to rejoin the board.

While on the board, Hochkammer was instrumental in the success of Lawrence’s $160 million “More Light!” campaign that ended in 2011 and served on the Presidential Search Committee that appointed Jill Beck as the university’s 15th president. He currently serves on the leadership team for Lawrence’s $75 million “Full Speed to Full Need” endowed scholarship campaign.

“Attending Lawrence was a life changing experience for me. It was instrumental to my transition from growing up on a Wisconsin farm, the first in my family to attend college, to completing law school and to a full and enjoyable life on both a personal and professional basis,” said Hochkammer. “While I valued my time as a student at Lawrence I didn’t then fully appreciate what I was gaining from my experience. As I had more life experiences, my appreciation for my Lawrence education continued to grow as I saw how well Lawrence had prepared me as a person.

“Today I see how strongly Lawrence is committed to its mission, how it continues to transform the lives of students and how it strives constantly to become even better at providing outstanding experiences to its students,” Hochkammer added.

After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in economics from Lawrence, Hochkammer earned a law degree from Northwestern University School of Law.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence mourns the passing of long-time benefactor Hugh Denison

Lawrence University has lost one of its most generous benefactors with the passing of Hugh Denison. A 1968 Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Lawrence, Denison died at his Milwaukee home June 9 after a lengthy battle with pulmonary fibrosis. He was 70 years old.

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Hugh Denison ’68

Voted the outstanding economics major of his graduating class, Denison became a highly successful businessman. He joined Heartland Advisors in 1985 as director of equity research and helped grow the Milwaukee-based investment firm into a multibillion-dollar money management company.

In 1996 at the age of 50, he experienced an epiphany and left the company to work with children. He earned a teaching certificate and spent eight years working with Junior Achievement, the Boy Scouts, YMCA and volunteering as a third-grade teacher in Milwaukee’s inner city schools teaching business principles.

In an interview with the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jim Kitzinger, principal and portfolio manager at KLCM Advisors Inc. in Milwaukee, said, “There are a lot of guys in our business who throw money at problems. Hugh threw himself at that problem.”

He returned to Heartland in 2004 as a portfolio manager, retiring in 2013 as senior vice president. Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett proclaimed the day of his “second” retirement as “Hugh Denison Day.”

A decorated combat veteran who served in Vietnam with the U.S. Navy, Denison was widely respected as a man of high integrity. He was renowned for the deep and lasting relationships he built, not only in his professional life, but also in the personal projects into which he poured himself, leaving indelible imprints on those he worked with.

Philanthropy and volunteerism were at the core of Denison’s life and few benefited more from his generous gifts of time, talent and treasure than Lawrence, which honored him with the university’s Jupp Outstanding Service Award in 2012.

He was currently serving as the chair of the university’s Full Speed to Full Need Campaign to bolster significantly endowed scholarship funding for Lawrence students. Playing an instrumental role through his personal fundraising efforts, the campaign has already raised more than $60 million toward a goal of $75 million.

Denison was also a member of the university’s Campaign Planning Task Force and previously served on the President’s Advisory Council. As co-chair of the Legacy Circle National Council, Denison tirelessly promoted the university’s planned giving program to classmates and peers at events and through personal testimonials. He often participated as a panelist in the Lawrence Scholars in Business program.

Hugh-Denison_newsblog2As a member of the Lawrence University Board of Trustees’ development and capital More Light! campaign committees, Denison was instrumental in the university’s fundraising efforts, traveling across the country to develop strong relationships with alumni and supporters of the college, and encouraging donors to realize their full philanthropic potential. For his many efforts, Denison was recognized by the Association of Fundraising Professionals with the Outstanding Fundraising Volunteer Award in November 2015.

A native of Sheboygan, Denison and his wife, Mary, provided leadership gifts in support of the Lawrence Fund, the Innovation and Entrepreneurship program and the Warch Bjorklunden endowment. Members of the Legacy Circle, the Denisons have established a generous provision in their estate plans for the Hugh and Mary Denison Endowed Fund in appreciation for Lawrence and their desire to enhance educational opportunities for future Lawrentians.

In addition to Lawrence, Denison’s community engagement included serving as the former president of the Board of Trustees for the John Michael Kohler Arts Center and the Sheboygan Arts Foundation. He also served on the board of directors of Big Brothers Big Sisters, Skylight Opera Theatre and the Milwaukee Athletic Club. Long-time service to Lakeland College, including guest lecturer, advisor to the president and a member of the college’s Foundation Committee earned Denison the title of honorary alumnus in 2013.

He is survived by his wife, Mary, and a son, Ross, of Portland, Ore., a sister, Judy Demuese, and brother-in-law, Jerry Doty. A memorial service celebrating Denison’s life will be held in August in Milwaukee.

As the Lawrence community mourns the passing of an exemplar Lawrentian, it celebrates his ceaseless gratitude, his positive spirit, his belief in his alma mater and his tireless efforts to sustain and improve the communities he called home.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Professors Kautsky, De Stasio, Tilghman honored at Lawrence’s 2016 commencement

Three members of the Lawrence University faculty were recognized for teaching and scholarship excellence Sunday, June 12 at the college’s 167th commencement.

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Catherine Kautsky

Professor of Music Catherine Kautsky received the Award for Excellence in Teaching, which recognizes outstanding performance in the teaching process, including the quest to ensure students reach their full development as individuals, human beings and future leaders of society.

Since first joining the faculty in 1987 — she spent six years at UW-Madison (2002-08) — Kautsky has used music to connect with other disciplines, particularly literature. She has presented lecture-recitals on topics ranging from the music of the Holocaust to French music and World War I. She also has organized performances for her students at numerous non-traditional venues, among them the Boys and Girls Club, a local soup kitchen, senior citizen centers and most recently the Oshkosh Correctional Institution.

In presenting the award, Provost and Dean of the Faculty David Burrows cited Kautsky for a “combination of insistence on excellence and your energetic, supportive nature [that] has led your students to high levels of success.”

“You let your students know they have the power to create beauty but must work vigorously to achieve that beauty,” said Burrows. “Your insistence on excellence as the gateway to beauty and enjoyment is highly distinctive.”

Kautsky’s repertoire includes Bach, Rzewski and Crumb, with a special emphasis on French music and the music of the first Viennese school. As a recitalist, soloist with orchestra or chamber musician, she has performed in venues around the world, including Alice Tully Hall and Carnegie Hall, as well as extensively in England and France. She also has presented classes in Brazil, China, Korea and South Africa.

She earned her bachelor’s degree from the New England Conservatory, a master’s degree from the Julliard School and a doctoral degree in performance from the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

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Bart De Stasio ’82

Bart De Stasio, Dennis and Charlot Nelson Singleton Professor of Biological Sciences and professor of biology, received the award for Excellence in Scholarship.

Established in 2006, the award recognizes a faculty member who has demonstrated sustained scholarly excellence for a number of years and whose work exemplifies the ideals of the teacher-scholar.

A specialist in predator-prey interactions, De Stasio has earned international recognition for his research on topics ranging from dormancy in aquatic organisms and its impact on ecology of lake communities to phytoplankton communities in Green Bay and Lake Michigan after the arrival of invasive species, including zebra mussels, spiny water fleas and round gobies. He has had more than 35 scientific papers and book chapters published, 19 of which were co-authored with Lawrence students.

Burrows praised De Stasio for his research on the effects of invasive species on food webs and on coral reefs in presenting him his award.

“It represents the very best qualities of the teacher-scholar model that we cherish at Lawrence,” said Burrows. “Much of your research is done in collaboration with students. These students are generating important research results while also learning to understand the world from the perspective of scientific inquiry.”

A member of the faculty since 1992, De Stasio has led Lawrence’s every-other-year marine biology trip to the Cayman Islands to study coral reefs for many years. Last summer, he spent a month in Russia collaborating with scientists on a study of Lake Baikal, examining how the lake is responding to climate change and other anthropogenic stresses.

A 1982 summa cum laude graduate of Lawrence, De Stastio earned his Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology from Cornell University.

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Ben Tilghman ’99

Ben Tilghman, assistant professor of art history, received the Young Teacher Award in recognition of demonstrated excellence in the classroom and the promise of continued growth.

A specialist in illuminated manuscripts of the Medieval and Renaissance periods, Tilghman has developed several courses designed to connect themes of the past with concerns of the present such as “Art of the Islamic World.”

Burrows hailed Tilghman for “a combination of great passion, concern for student success and an ability to encourage discussion and argument while making students feel calm and comfortable.”

“Your devotion to the ideals of liberal learning, which you like to point out were first articulated in the Middle Ages, has led you to stress the importance of opening one’s mind to multiple perspectives on the world and to model for students the process of trying to make sense of complex materials,” said Burrows. “The ability to connect knowledge and creativity is the hallmark of a Lawrence education and is a distinctive characteristic of your success as a teacher.”

Before joining the Lawrence faculty in 2012, Tilghman taught in the art history department at George Washington University for two years. He also spent three years in the department of manuscripts and rare books at Baltimore’s Walters Art Museum.

He earned a bachelor’s degree from Lawrence in 1999, a master’s degree from Williams College and his Ph.D. at Johns Hopkins University.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence celebrates 167th commencement, honors novelist Lan Samantha Chang

Lan Samantha Chang knew she wanted to be a writer since she was four years old.

The Appleton native who followed her dream and became an award-winning novelist returns to her hometown to be recognized for her literary achievements as the recipient of an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from Lawrence University Sunday, June 12 at the college’s 167th commencement.

Lan Samantha Chang will receive an honorary degree from Lawrence and serve as the principal speaker at the college's 167th commencement June 12. Photo by Tom Jorgensen.
Lan Samantha Chang will receive an honorary degree from Lawrence and serve as the principal speaker at the college’s 167th commencement June 12. Photo by Tom Jorgensen.

Chang, 51, who has directed the prestigious Iowa Writers’ Workshop at the University of Iowa for the past 10 years, also will be the featured commencement speaker.

Lawrence is expected to award 364 bachelor degrees to 350 students from 32 states, the District of Columbia and 19 countries. A live webcast of the commencement ceremony will be available at http://go.lawrence.edu/lugrad16.

A baccalaureate service will be conducted Saturday, June 11 at 11 a.m. in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel. Benjamin Tilghman ’99, assistant professor of art history, presents “What Makes Us Unique Also Binds Us Together: Empathy, Curiosity and the Liberal Arts.” The baccalaureate service and commencement exercise are both free and open to the public.

Four retiring faculty members — John Dreher, Merton Finkler, Nicholas Maravolo and Patricia Vilches — will each be recognized with an honorary master of arts degree, ad eundem, as part of the ceremonies. Vilches will be honored in absentia.

In addition to Chang, Lawrence President Mark Burstein, Board of Trustees Chair Susan Stillman Kane ’72 and senior Kevin Marin of Queens, N.Y., also will address the graduates.

Commencement_mortar-board_newsblogWhile Chang was burying herself in books as a child, dreaming about some kind of artistic future, her parents, who emigrated from China more than 65 years ago and had witnessed the horrors of a world war, had their hearts set on her pursuing a career in medicine, which they viewed as something stable.

“When I applied to Yale, I wrote in my application that I wanted to be a dermatologist mostly because it’s the only kind of doctor I had ever been to,” said Chang of her initial efforts to mollify her parents. “I started taking science classes and instantly realized that I did not want to pursue that path. It was very stressful because I was too chicken to talk to my parents about the decision. It was a year or two before I was able to tell them I didn’t want to be a doctor and I had to come up with a backup plan. So I told them I wanted to be a lawyer.”

After earning a degree in East Asian Studies at Yale, Chang attended the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, where she earned a master’s degree in public administration.

“I realized that I didn’t want to pursue that direction either,” said Chang. “It was really just a question of coming to face the fact that I had never wanted to do anything else except write fiction and it would be pointless to keep trying to do other things.”Chang-Book_newsblog

Applying to, and getting accepted to, the Iowa’s Writers’ Workshop was the launching pad for her long-dreamt-about career as a writer.

After earning a master of fine arts degree at the University of Iowa, she taught creative writing at Stanford University as Jones Lecturer in Fiction, in Warren Wilson College’s MFA program for writers and at Harvard University as Briggs-Copland Lecturer in Creative Writing.

She returned to the Writers’ Workshop in 2006 as its director while also teaching English as the May Brodbeck Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

“I feel honored to be leading the workshop and proud that the program is still very strong.”

Chang’s connection to the Iowa Writers’ Workshop goes back to when she was in the eighth grade at Appleton’s Einstein Middle School. A grant enabled the Appleton Area School District to have a young poet, Monroe Lerner, who was a graduate of the Writers’ Workshop, spend a year working with students in the district on creative writing.

“It seems to me our society would be strongest if as many people as possible were given the time to read widely, think broadly and try to understand the human experience before they went out into the world. It can always benefit our society if as many people as possible study liberal arts.”
         — Lan Samantha Chang

 

Commencement_hug_newsblog“I was deeply interested in reading and writing and didn’t have an outlet for it, so every week for a year I got to meet with Monroe Lerner,” said Chang, a 1983 graduate of Appleton West High School. “It was a phenomenal experience for me…probably the most important writing experience I had until after college because he took me seriously and he introduced me to a lot of good books. He put the idea of going to Iowa in my head when I was in eighth grade.”

One of only three Chinese families living in Appleton while Chang was growing up, she was inspired by her experiences as an Asian American to write two novels and a collection of short stories about the merging of Chinese and American culture and the dynamics of family and wealth in times of hardship. Her works include 1998’s “Hunger: A Novella and Stories,” 2004’s “Inheritance” and “All is Forgotten, Nothing is Lost” in 2010.

“Inheritance” received the 2005 PEN Open Book Award while “Hunger” was the winner of the Southern Review Fiction Prize and named a finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book Award. Her work has been selected twice (1994, 1996) for inclusion in the yearly anthology “The Best American Short Stories.”

In addition to her accomplishments, her deep connections to Lawrence made Chang a natural for an honorary degree and invitation to deliver the commencement address. Her mother earned a bachelor of music degree in piano pedagogy from Lawrence, while her father was an associate professor of engineering at the former Institute of Paper Chemistry, which had a long affiliation with Lawrence

“Receiving an honorary degree from Lawrence means a great deal to me,” said Chang, “because when I was growing up, Lawrence was the center of intellectual life in Appleton. It is a greatly respected university. I have vivid memories of being at the conservatory during my mother’s recitals and meeting her professors.”

In part because of her exposure to Lawrence as a youth, Chang holds liberal arts education in high regard.Commencement_selfie_newsblog

“It seems to me our society would be strongest if as many people as possible were given the time to read widely, think broadly and try to understand the human experience before they went out into the world,” said Chang, who admits she wanted “to stretch my wings and leave Appleton” and didn’t consider attending Lawrence when the time came. “I think that the liberal arts education always has benefits to any person, regardless of what they eventually do to make a living. It can always benefit our society if as many people as possible study liberal arts.”

Chang’s 93-year-old father still lives in Appleton. He is looking forward to seeing his daughter deliver her first commencement address.

“I think he’s probably more excited about this than anybody in my family. One of the reasons I’m so excited about it is because my dad is so excited about it. Of course, it makes me nervous because I know that he’ll be there. I want to do a good job.”

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

 

 

 

Thank you! Lawrence honoring four retiring faculty members for 156 years of teaching experience

Records, the adage goes, are meant to be broken. But this particular milestone was not one Lawrence University philosophy professor John Dreher had any particular interest in setting.

“I wasn’t trying to beat anybody,” Dreher says almost apologetically.

John Dreher
John Dreher

As the 2015-16 academic year comes to a close, Dreher becomes the college’s longest-serving, full-time faculty member with 53 years in the classroom. He and three teaching colleagues — Merton Finkler, Nicholas Maravolo and Patricia Vilches — will be honored Sunday, June 12 at the college’s 167th commencement as retiring faculty members. Collectively they have given the college an incredible 156 combined years of service. Each will be recognized with an honorary master of arts degree, ad eundem, as part of the graduation ceremonies. Vilches will be honored in absentia.

Dreher, Lawrence’s Lee Claflin-Robert S. Ingraham Professor of Philosophy, joined the faculty in 1963 after beginning his teaching career at the University of North Carolina. His full-time teaching tenure surpasses the late Bertrand Goldgar, who taught in the Lawrence English department for 52 years.

“It doesn’t matter that much to me. Sorry,” Dreher, 81, said of his place in Lawrence annals. “I just did it year-by-year. I wasn’t saying ‘oh I’ll just hold on one more year.’”

Despite weather challenges and the occasional malady, he points with pride to having missed only two teaching days in his 53-year Lawrence career — and none in the past 48 — and credits the quality of Lawrence students for keeping his five-plus decades of teaching interesting.

“I’ve enjoyed working with some damn good students,” said Dreher, who thinks of himself as more coach than professor, “and some who didn’t know they were good. I was able to get them to dig down a little deeper. I’m proud of the good ones who got even better when I got pushy in class. They responded to the coaching. They had talent that they then developed.

“I’m getting emails, phone calls, letters from folks who graduated 40, 30, 20, 10 years ago saying ‘you know what, you made a big difference.’ That’s called psychic income. I love it.”
— John Dreher

“Lawrence has students who don’t specialize in some one thing. When I teach a philosophy class I’m not doing narrow philosophy. I’m not teaching future philosophy professors, although some turn out to be. I like working with people who are going to be bankers, lawyers, CEOs, fourth-grade teachers. I like helping people get broad backgrounds,” added Dreher, whose own undergraduate degree was in English, not philosophy. “In some of my courses I read stuff by economists and short story writers. I like to do the broad stuff, which is why I like teaching at a liberal arts college.”

John Dreher_newsblog_fullA native of Jersey City, N. J., Dreher has twice been awarded the college’s Babcock Award, which recognizes “outstanding service to students.” He received the University Award for Excellence in Teaching 1989 and the Freshman Studies Teaching award in 2002. On three different occasions (1982–83; 1986–87; 1993–95) he directed the college’s signature Freshman Studies program.

He looks back fondly on the freedom he received from the administration over the years.

“I had the feeling I could use my own judgment to do what I think was best for my students and my classes and nobody was looking over my shoulder,” said Dreher, whose scholarship interests include environmental ethics, applied ethics and the history of philosophy. “They trusted me to do my job and to do it right. I really appreciated that.”

While retiring from full-time teaching, Dreher won’t be leaving the classroom entirely. He’s scheduled to teach one of his favorite courses, environmental ethics, Winter Term each of the next three years.

“I cannot go cold turkey on something I’ve been throwing myself into this whole time,” said Dreher, whose daily workout regimen has been slowed a bit by recent double knee replacement surgery.

With his reduced teaching load, Dreher is looking forward to having more time to tend to the two large gardens at his rural Black Creek home, attend more Lawrence concerts, travel to Europe and volunteer with local environmental groups.

In the meantime, he’s enjoying hearing from former students.

“I’m getting emails, phone calls, letters from folks who graduated 40, 30, 20, 10 years ago saying ‘you know what, you made a big difference.’ That’s called psychic income. I love it.”

Marty-Finkler_newsblog_retire
Merton Finkler

Since joining the faculty in 1979, Finkler, the John R. Kimberly Distinguished Professor in the American Economic System and Professor of Economics, has left his mark on the college through new courses as well as new programs.

He was instrumental in launching Lawrence’s thriving innovation and entrepreneurship program and was among the leaders in developing the university’s popular interdisciplinary Sustainable China Program, which has evolved from other initiatives that began in 2003.

“I’ve been to China nine times and I haven’t paid for one of them,” Finkler, 68, says with a smile. He admits his Chinese is “still not good enough to cause trouble. I know a number of words, but I really can’t hold a conversation with anybody.”

The Innovation and Entrepreneurship Program began in 2008 and Finkler was among the faculty members who helped write its initial curriculum.

“The I & E program has received university-wide interest, which I think is critical to its success,” said Finkler, who spent three years on the faculty at the University of Minnesota before coming to Lawrence.

“Lawrence gave me not just every opportunity, but every encouragement… I’m not sure what other venue I could have had with that kind of opportunity.”
     –– Merton Finkler

During his tenure, Finkler established himself as an expert in the field of healthcare. He has taught courses on health policy and economics and co-chaired two statewide conferences that generated healthcare policy directives for the Wisconsin legislature. He has served on the Wisconsin Governor’s Task Force on Funding of Academic Medical Centers as well as on the state’s Data Expert Advisory Group on Public Health. He also conducted a pair of research projects on the costliness of healthcare in Wisconsin for the Greater Milwaukee Business Group on Health.

“It’s been a nice way to apply a variety of different skills to a substantive topic that people care about,” Finkler said of his healthcare interests. “The challenges are not going to go away, the demographics ensure that we have to figure out a better way to use our healthcare resources or we’re going to get eaten alive financially.”Marty-Finkler_newsblog_office

He was awarded a Robert Wood Johnson faculty fellowship in healthcare finance that enabled him to spend extended time at Johns Hopkins University as well as a year in-residence at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program in California. And for eight years, he was a partner in a local healthcare-focused consulting firm.

“That experience enabled me to make contacts with various stakeholders in the healthcare industry,” Finkler said of his side business venture. “It was valuable in that I saw the various perspectives people provided in delivery of healthcare services. That certainly enriched my background, my experience and my understanding of the character of financing and delivery system problems and what has to be addressed if anything is to change.”

Following Dreher’s lead, Finkler won’t completely abandon the classroom. He is slated to teach a hybrid class on financial investing this fall.

“I’d like to continue to teach one or two courses each year and fill in the gaps where need be, but that depends on departmental needs and the God of budgets,” said Finkler, who grew up in San Bernadino, Calif.

He does plan to keep his hand in the healthcare field in retirement. He’s in the embryonic stage of a joint project in Marathon County to help develop a community health business partnership focused on improving the public’s health while containing costs.

In reflecting on his 37 years at Lawrence, Finkler sys he is grateful for the support he received to do what he wanted within the realm of the university’s mission.

“I had the opportunity to essentially learn how to teach and take that particular skill set and use it in my consulting work. Then I could bring examples and experts from the real world to class to talk seriously about health policy. The synergies are huge and Lawrence gave me not just every opportunity, but every encouragement to go ahead and do that. I’m not sure what other venue I could have had with that kind of opportunity.”

Nick-Maravolo_newsblog-retire
Nicholas Maravolo

Maravolo, professor of biology, is a member of Lawrence’s elite 50-year club. Since joining the Lawrence faculty in 1966, his half century of teaching does not surprise him.

“I knew when I got here it was exactly the kind of place I wanted to be at,” Maravolo, 75, says without hesitation.

Mentoring has been at the heart of Maravolo’s career. He was the founder of Lawrence’s pre-medical advisory committee and its guiding force for decades.

“Over the years I’ve worked with hundreds of students who have successfully made it into medical school and dental school and they still keep in touch with me. That’s certainly something I’m proud of,” said Maravolo, who grew up on the south side of Chicago and earned his bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees from the nearby University of Chicago.

Not only do those former students stay in touch, they take care of him. When Maravolo found himself in the hospital for an extended stay several months ago, four of the doctors treating him were his former students.

“My greatest satisfaction is from mentoring hundreds of students, getting them into their professional track and just keeping them on track when they got disillusioned.”
     — Nicholas Maravolo

In 2010, Maravolo oversaw the launch of the LU-R1 program, which paired current students with Lawrence alumni scientists working at major institutions and organizations around the country for summer research opportunities.

“I looked at LUR1 not as a job, but as an honor that was offered to our best science students,” said Maravolo. “What I tried to do was match the student’s personality and interests with the interests and personality of the alumni that I know. It’s the same philosophy I had in structuring advice I gave to the pre-medical students. It wasn’t cookie cutter advice, it was more about who are you and what’s going to make you shine in the light of your professional interest?”

Maravolo is known affectionately to generations of students simply as “Doc,” an informal version of doctor, which his students didn’t like calling him early in his career. His title eventually morphed into the shortened salutation.

“I kind of liked it and felt comfortable with it,” said Maravolo. “It takes that frightening dimension away from the more formal ‘doctor.’”

Maravolo-newsblog_groupTutorials have been one of the hallmarks of Maravolo’s tenure and he has taught so many of them students often refer to him as “the tutorial king.”

“Tutorials are more about teaching the student to have a proprietary interest in their education, something they’re going to carry with them for the rest of their life,” said Maravolo, who points with pride that three quarters of the students who do a tutorial with him are from disciplines other than biology. “I learn as well from most of the tutorials I teach. I’m going to miss doing those.”

As the college’s resident botany expert, Maravolo has established himself as Lawrence’s s wine guru. One of his most popular classes over the years — “The Science of Wine” — grew out of a conversation one evening over dinner at a restaurant with students who were working in his laboratory. One suggested he teach a class on beer. The suds idea was nixed, but a course examining the microbiology, the horticulture and the health benefits of wine did emerge.

Beyond the campus, numerous organizations have been the beneficiaries of Maravolo’s expertise. He has served on the board of the Mosquito Hill Nature Center, where he helped drive in the stakes for the original building. He served on the organizing board for the Memorial Park Arboretum and Gardens and has been a consultant to the Gordon Bubolz Nature Preserve and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. He traveled the state as a member of the State of Wisconsin Scientific Areas Preservation Committee and served as chairman of the education committee for the Botanical Society of America.

Among all his professional accomplishments though, it always comes back to the students.

“My greatest satisfaction is from mentoring hundreds of students, getting them into their professional track and just keeping them on track when they got disillusioned.”

Patti-Vilches_newsblog_retire
Patricia Vilches

Vilches, professor of Spanish and Italian, was the beneficiary of good timing.

A year after she joined the faculty in 2000 as a visiting professor to replace a departing member of the Spanish department, Lawrence approved a program in Italian language. Having completed her Ph.D. in romance languages and literatures from the University of Chicago a few years earlier, Vilches was the perfect fit to help launch the new program. She spent a second year teaching both languages before being appointed to a tenure track appointment in 2002.

“Lawrence provided a unique opportunity for me to teach Spanish and Italian,” said Vilches, whose Spanish phonetics course famously became a rite of passage for many students. “I was ready and eager to teach both languages when given the chance.”

Born in Viña del Mar, Chile, Vilches came to the United States as a 17-year old exchange student with the Youth for Understanding program. She lived in La Grange, Ill., for a year with a host American family while attending Lyons Township High School.

“I have met a few graduates from Lyons Township since I began teaching at Lawrence,” she said proudly.

She spent eight years teaching Spanish and Italian at the University of Evansville before winding up at Lawrence, in part because her husband, Gerald Seaman, was hired as associate dean of the faculty.

“I will miss my wonderful students, my wonderful colleagues, the theatre productions and those fabulous student senior recitals.”
     — Patricia Vilches

At Lawrence, she became known for her rigorous courses, her long exams and her lengthy comments on student papers.

“I’m proud to have helped students perfect their abilities in Spanish and Italian,” said Vilches. “Students knew they would be challenged and would sometimes face frustrations, but I think they also realized that my courses rewarded them in subtle and concrete ways. My goal was for the students to immerse themselves in the subject and dedicate time and effort to what I presented in the classroom. I like to think students appreciated what I did for them as their teacher.”Patti-Vilches_group_newsblog

For the past two years, Vilches has been on leave from Lawrence, living in England, where her husband is principal and CEO of Harlaxton College. Her time in the UK largely has been spent finishing a book about Chilean novelist Alberto Blest Gana.

While teaching is not in her immediate future plans, she is looking forward to editing a scholarly volume on singer, songwriter, poet and artist Violeta Parra, one of the most important public figures in 20th-century Chile, in time for the 100th anniversary celebration of Parra’s birth in 2017.

“I will miss my wonderful students, my wonderful colleagues, the theatre productions and those fabulous student senior recitals,” Vilches says of her 16 years at Lawrence. “I’ve built some enduring friendships and because of those friends, part of me will always be there.”

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Wriston Art Center features Lawrence senior studio art majors

Senior-Art-Show_2016_newsblog2
Abigail Kosberg: “I am Dophie Doltz,” acrylic paint and thread on cotton fabric

Eight Lawrence University art majors will have their creative work featured in the annual senior major exhibition opening Friday, May 27 in the Wriston Art Center galleries.

The exhibition, which is free and open to the public, runs through July 3. A reception with the student artists at 6 p.m. opens the exhibition.

Works in the exhibition include photography, ceramics, sculpture, textiles, paintings, installation and performance art.

The seniors whose work will be featured are:
• Oumou Cisse, Washington D.C.
• Tess Gundersen, Santa Fe, N.M.
• Liam Hoy, Chicago, Ill.
• Abigail Kosberg, Wildwood, Ill.
• Brandin Kreuder, Burlington
• Isabella Schleisner, Greenville
• Laura Udelson, San Francisco, Calif.
• Austin Wellner, Green Bay

LU-Senior-Art-Show_newsblog1
Brandin Kreuder: “Paddled Box,” ceramic

The Wriston Art Center galleries are free and open to the public Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday noon – 4 p.m.; closed Mondays. For more information on the exhibition, 920-832-6890.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence adds expertise in the legal, investment, academic and development fields to its Board of Trustees

Four new members have been elected to Lawrence University’s Board of Trustees, including two with previous board service. Each joins the board effective July 1.

Attorney William Hochkammer, University of California, San Diego alumni director Tamika Franklin, Columbia University political scientist John Huber and equity fund founder Cory Nettles were named to the board at its recently concluded May meeting.

They will replace two retiring members of the board: John Ellerman, a 1958 Lawrence graduate who has served on the board since 1983; and David Knapp, a 1989 Lawrence graduate who joined the board in 2002.

“On behalf of the Board of Trustees, I am pleased to welcome back former trustees Bill Hochkammer and Cory Nettles,” said board chair Susie Stillman Kane ’72. “Bill provided outstanding leadership during his tenure as chair of the board and co-chair of the “More Light” campaign a decade ago. Cory’s more recent contributions as a member of the President’s Advisory Council have been invaluable. We look forward to the insights he will bring to the board.

“With John’s expertise in academia and the liberal arts and Tamika’s in development and alumni relations, their additions will enhance even further the multi-generational makeup and perspective of our board,” Kane added.

Bill-Hochkammer_newsblog2016
Willilam Hochkammer

William Hochkammer ’66, Bloomfield Hills, Mich.
A partner at the Detroit law firm of Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn, L.L.P., Hochkammer rejoins the board having previously served as a member from 1993-2015, including as chair of the board from 2005-07. He is the first trustee in Lawrence history to complete his term limit and be invited to rejoin the board.

As co-chair of the Capital Campaign Steering Committee, Hochkammer was instrumental in the success of the $160 million “More Light!” campaign, the most ambitious fundraising effort in Lawrence’s history, that ended in 2011.

He served on the Presidential Search Committee that appointed Jill Beck as the university’s 15th president and currently serves as a member of the leadership team for Lawrence’s $75 million “Full Speed to Full Need” endowed scholarship campaign.

A 1966 Lawrence graduate, Hochkammer joined Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn in 1972 and was the founding chair of the firm’s health care and insurance departments. He served as the firm’s chair from 1991-98 and as its CEO from 1993-98.

Hochkammer has been included on the annual “Best Lawyers in America” list every year since 1991 in the areas of health care law and insurance law. He was recognized as the Detroit Insurance Lawyer of the Year in 2011 and the Detroit Health Care Law Lawyer of the Year in 2014 by “Best Lawyers.”

In addition to a bachelor’s degree in economics from Lawrence, Hochkammer earned a law degree from Northwestern University School of Law, where he was a writer and editor for the Journal of Criminal Law.

Tamika-Franklin_newsblog
Tamika Franklin

Tamika Franklin ’05, San Diego, Calif.
Franklin is the board’s third Recent Graduate Trustee, a position established in 2014 exclusively for Lawrence alumni within 2-10 years of their graduation. She will serve one three-year term.

An advancement professional, Franklin has served as UC-San Diego’s director of alumni affairs within the development and alumni relations office for the division of physical sciences since May 2013. She played a leading role in developing UCSD’s Black Alumni Council and an Asian Pacific Islander Alumni Council and serves as a staff liaison for both. UCSD honored Franklin with its Diversity Award in 2014.

Prior to joining UCSD, Franklin spent four years at San Diego State University working with the vice president of university relations and development.

A native of Jamaica, Franklin earned a bachelor’s degree in government and philosophy from Lawrence in 2005.

John-Huber_newsblog
John Huber

John Huber ’84, New York, N.Y.
An accomplished and nationally recognized scholar, Huber joined the political science department at Columbia University in 1998 after faculty appointments at Ohio State and the University of Michigan. He was promoted to full professor in 2002 and has served as chair of the department six of the past 10 years.

At Columbia, he has been engaged in institutional issues related to admissions, financial aid and global education.

A specialist in the comparative study of democratic processes, Huber’s current research interests focus on ethnic politics, inequality and the politics of redistribution.

He is the author of the books “Rationalizing Parliament” and “Deliberate Discretion? Institutional Foundations of Bureaucratic Autonomy,” which received numerous awards, including the William Riker Prize. It was named 2002’s best book in comparative politics by the American Political Science Association.

Huber was elected to the prestigious American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2013 and spent 10 years as the editor of the Quarterly Journal of Political Science. He also has served on the editorial boards of several publications, including the Journal of Politics, French Politics, Legislative Studies Quarterly and the American Journal of Political Science.

A 1984 cum laude graduate of Lawrence with a degree in government, Huber earned a master’s degree and Ph.D. in political science from the University of Rochester.

Cory-Nettles_newsblog
Cory Nettles

Cory Nettles ’92, Bayside, Wis.
An attorney, Nettles begins his second as a board member, having previously served from 2005-10. He is the former co-chair of the President’s Advisory Council.

Nettles is the founder and managing director of Generation Growth Capital, Inc., a Milwaukee-based private equity fund that provides growth capital to lower middle-market companies in the Midwest. The company is committed to working in low to moderate income communities, investing and creating jobs in distressed communities and supporting ethnic minority entrepreneurs.

He serves of counsel with Quarles and Brady LLP in the law firm’s corporate services and government relations groups. His experience ranges from mergers and acquisitions to tax incremental financing and diversity-related matters.

Nettles served as the secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Commerce from 2003-05 under Governor Jim Doyle before joining the corporate world. As secretary, he managed one of the state’s largest agencies, with 450 employees and an annual budget in excess of $225M. He was a principal architect of Governor Doyle’s “Grow Wisconsin” plan, a comprehensive strategy for investing more than $1 billion in Wisconsin’s economy.

In 2015, he was one of five African-American executives who formed Partners for Community Impact LLC to become minority investors in the Milwaukee Bucks basketball team.

Besides Lawrence, Nettles serves as a board member numerous businesses and organizations, among them Associated Bank, the United Way of Greater Milwaukee. Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee, Teach For America, the Medical College of Wisconsin and the University of Wisconsin Foundation.

He was inducted into the Milwaukee Business Journal’s “40 Under 40 Hall of Fame” in 2015 and was named one of the “Most Influential African Americans in Wisconsin” by Madison 365 that same year.

After graduating magna cum laude from Lawrence in 1992 with a degree in government, Nettles earned a law degree from the University of Wisconsin.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.