Lawrence University News

Lawrence Student Percussionists Win International World Ensemble Competition

Posted on: July 31st, 2014 by Rick Peterson
LUPE-Percussion_competition_newsblog

The Lawrence University Percussion Ensemble won the 2014 Percussive Arts Society’s World Percussion Ensemble Competition and will be a featured performer at the PAS international convention in November.

The Lawrence University Percussion Ensemble (LUPÉ) will be among the featured performers at the Percussive Arts Society International Convention this November in Indianapolis, Ind., after winning the organization’s 2014 World Percussion Ensemble Competition.

LUPÉ — comprising the Sambistas, a Brazilian drumming corps, Kinkaviwo, a Ghanaian drum and dance group and Tambotoke´, an Afro-Cuban group — was selected the winner from among submitted video tapes. The annual PAS-sponsored World Percussion Competition is open to high school and college/university ensembles performing non-Western percussion-based music. Lawrence’s submission was from its March 2014 concert in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel.

It is the second time LUPE has won a PAS international competition under the direction of Professor of Music Dane Richeson. LUPE won the 1995 PAS collegiate percussion ensemble competition and performed at its international conference in Phoenix that year.

Dane-Richeson_newsblog

Professor of Music Dane Richeson

“I am so proud of my students and am honored to be recognized by the Percussive Arts Society for the second time,” said Richeson, who has directed Lawrence’s percussion studio since 1984. “Winning the World Percussion Competition is a testament to the dedication and hard work our students put into learning these music traditions from Brazil, Ghana and Cuba. Many of the student directors of our ensembles have received grants to travel to these countries and study with master musicians similar to the ones I have had opportunities to study with during my sabbaticals there. It fills me with pride to see our students embrace this music as if it was from their own culture.”

The Percussive Arts Society International Convention is the world’s largest percussion event, featuring more than 120 concerts, clinics, master classes, labs, workshops, panels and presentations. Lawrence will perform at the convention with winners in other categories of PAS-sponsored competitions, including ensembles from the University of Kentucky, Oklahoma State University and Yale University.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Wriston Galleries Summer Exhibition Series Features Thomas, Margaret Dietrich Paintings

Posted on: July 26th, 2014 by Rick Peterson

The work of former Lawrence University art professor Thomas Dietrich and his wife, Margaret Rappe Dietrich, opens Lawrence’s Wriston Art Center Galleries new summer exhibition series Wednesday, July 30.

Thomas-Dietrich_Fox-River-Mill_newsblog

Thomas Dietrich’s “Fox River Mill” will be among the paintings featured in the new Wriston Art Center Galleries summer exhibition series.

The series is designed to engage the Fox Valley community in a conversation about artworks and artists of the Midwest. The inaugural exhibition runs through August 17.

An Appleton native, Tom Dietrich was a professor of art and later artist-in-residence at Lawrence from 1944-74. During a career spanning seven decades, Dietrich was best known for his watercolor paintings of the people, paper mills, bridges and landscapes of the Fox Valley. He died in 1998.

Margaret Dietrich grew up in Chicago and graduated from Lawrence in 1936. Like her husband, the Fox Cities were a favorite subject matter. She frequently captured Appleton’s Lutz and Pierce parks, as well as other local scenery, through her oil and watercolor paintings.

Beyond the 45 works exhibited at the Wriston Galleries, a map will be available that identifies other Fox Cities locations where the Dietrichs’ work can be seen, including the History Museum at the Castle and the Paper Discovery Center.

The Wriston Art Center galleries are free and open to the public Tuesday-Friday from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Saturday-Sunday from noon – 4 p.m. The galleries are closed on Mondays. For more information on the exhibition, call 920-832-6890.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence Receives $2.5 Million Gift to Endow Elementary Education Program

Posted on: July 24th, 2014 by Rick Peterson
John&Sally-Mielke_newsblog

John and Sally Mielke

The Mielke family’s dedication to improving education in the Fox Cities is legendary.

Three generations of Mielkes have contributed time, talent, passion, vision and philanthropy to growing and sustaining educational programs and organizations that are almost too numerous to count.

Mielkes have taught — and still do — in public schools, trained future nurses and led education policy through extensive school board service. Dr. John and Sally Mielke helped create the Brain to Five initiative, an education series focused on early childhood development, and are among the driving forces behind the collaborative Community Early Learning Center that will launch later this year.

Their legacy grows with a $2.5 million gift from the Mielke Family Foundation in partnership with John, Sally and the Mielke family, to expand Lawrence University’s current teacher education program to include elementary teacher education beginning in the fall of 2015.

In honor of the family’s extraordinary investment in education studies and teacher training, the education program at Lawrence will be named the Mielke Family Department of Education.

Mark-Burstein-newsblog

President Mark Burstein

“Lawrence is honored to join the Mielke Family Foundation in this venture,” said Lawrence University president Mark Burstein. “This extraordinary investment will create an innovative educational path for excellent elementary teachers, open new doors for Lawrence students, and underscore the Fox Cities’ reputation as a family-friendly community where education is a shared priority. We are deeply thankful for the Mielke’s continued support of Lawrence.”

“Our family is privileged to call Appleton our hometown, where children are treasured and education is valued, starting at birth,” said John Mielke. “We thank Lawrence for what it adds to the educational community in Appleton.”

Lawrence’s education program currently offers teacher certification in grades 5-12 in computer science, English, math, social studies, and theatre arts and K-12 certification in art, music, foreign language and English as a Second Language. Approximately 10-12 percent of Lawrence graduates complete teacher certification. The teacher education program also is open to graduates of other colleges and universities.

“This extraordinary investment will create an innovative educational path for excellent elementary teachers, open new doors for Lawrence students, and underscore the Fox Cities’ reputation as a family-friendly community where education is a shared priority.”
   — President Mark Burstein

The new offerings in elementary education will increase the reach of Lawrence’s existing teacher education program, whose graduates are highly regarded by the principals in whose schools they work and by the parents of the students they teach. The expansion will feature a distinctive apprenticeship-based program of pre-K-6 teacher preparation.

Based on an emerging best-practice model, students pursuing teacher certification for pre-K-through grade 6 will spend an entire academic year in a local host school under the guidance of a cooperating teacher. As apprentice teachers, the Lawrence students will receive weekly, on-site, subject-specific methods instruction from master teachers.

Stewart Purkey_newsblog_copy

Stewart Purkey

“We believe this will become not only a signature program for Lawrence, but also a lighthouse program for Wisconsin,” said Stewart Purkey, the Bee Connell Mielke Professor of Education at Lawrence. “We are exceptionally pleased and proud that the Appleton Area School District has agreed to work with us as a partner in establishing it and we look forward to working closely with the district elementary teachers who will guide and shepherd our students.

“Not only is this wonderful news for Lawrence and our students, many of whom have expressed great interest in teaching elementary school but were not able to do so through our current program, but we think this is also good news for the elementary schools in which our graduates will teach,” Purkey added. “We believe Lawrence’s liberal arts based approach to teacher education is exactly the sort of background that will produce outstanding and effective elementary school teachers.”

Graduates of Lawrence’s present teacher education program have an in-depth major in an academic discipline, the breadth of knowledge gained from taking courses across the liberal arts and sciences and the focused professional knowledge in the art and craft of teaching. This will also be the case for Lawrence students in the elementary education program.

The Mielke Family Department of Education is the latest of numerous educational collaborations between Lawrence and the Mielke Family Foundation. Previously, the foundation has supported:
• the establishment of the Bee Connell Mielke Professor of Education in 1996, the first endowed professorship in the college’s education department.

• the establishment of the Edward F. Mielke Professorship in Ethics, Medicine Science and Society in 1987.

• the Mielke Summer Institute in the Liberal Arts, an initiative launched in 1996 that brings 25 area teachers to Bjorkunden, Lawrence’s northern campus in Door County, for a week-long, for-credit professional development program.

The Mielke Family Foundation was established in 1963 by the late Dr. Edward Mielke and Bee Mielke and later supplemented through bequests from his sisters, Ruth Mielke and Sarah Mielke, 1914 and 1916 Lawrence graduates, respectively.

The foundation received the inaugural Lawrence University Collaboration in Action award in 2010.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

A Teachers’ Teacher: Lawrence Mourns the Passing of Professor Kenneth Sager

Posted on: July 22nd, 2014 by Rick Peterson

Professor Emeritus Kenneth Sager, the face of Lawrence University’s education department for nearly four decades, died peacefully Friday, July 18 at the age of 96.

Ken Sager_newsblog

Professor Emeritus Ken Sager taught in the education department at Lawrence from 1963-2001.

Sager graduated from Lawrence in 1939 and later returned to his alma mater, where he spent 38 years as a teacher and mentor in the college’s education department.  He passed away just days before Lawrence announced a $2.5 million gift that will expand the education department to include a distinctive apprenticeship-based program of pre-K-6 teacher preparation, a development he would have heartily applauded.

A funeral service is scheduled Thursday, July 24 at 11 a.m. at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 200 Commercial St., Neenah. Visitation will be held from 9 a.m. until time of service. Interment will be at Appleton’s Riverside Cemetery.

An Appleton native who spent all but a few years in his hometown, Sager was involved in education on multiple fronts nearly his entire adult life. Prior to joining the Lawrence education department in 1963, he spent 19 years in the classroom of his prep alma mater, Appleton Senior High School (now Appleton West), where he taught history, speech, psychology, philosophy and political science.

He earned a bachelor of arts degree in history in 1939 from Lawrence, where he played cello in the symphony. A member of Phi Beta Kappa, he was certified to teach English and history upon his graduation.

He earned a master’s degree in American history from the University of Wisconsin, but spent two years working at Pettibone-Peabody Company, Appleton’s pre-eminent dry goods store at the time, before embarking on a teaching career that spanned 59 years.

He began his teaching career in 1942 when a position opened up at Appleton High School after a teacher decided he would rather grow Christmas trees than continue working in the classroom. “He wanted to grow Christmas trees, I decided to grow people,” Sager once explained of his somewhat serendipitous entry into the education field.

After “officially” retiring from Lawrence in 2001 at the age of 83, Sager continued to teach speech courses until the age of 90. When asked about his long teaching tenure, Sager remarked, “If you like cheese, eat it!”

He devoted his life to improving education and his efforts extended beyond the classroom. He served 39 years on the Appleton Board of Education — one of only four people in the state with that lengthy of a tenure among Wisconsin’s 426 school districts at the time of his departure from the board (2003).

In addition to the Appleton Board of Education, Sager served as a trustee of the Upper Midwest Regional Education Laboratory, the Hazel Duling Scholarship Fund, was a member of the Committee for Career Education in Wisconsin Public Schools and was involved for many years with Appleton’s “A Better Chance” program.

His long career of service was recognized with numerous honors, among them induction into the Appleton West Hall of Fame in 2004 and the “Most Wonderful Person Award” from the Appleton Women’s Club in 1992. Upon his retirement from the board in 2003, the Appleton School Board voted to name the learning center at the Classical School “The Ken Sager Center” in recognition of his many years of dedicated service.

A music lover, Sager sang in local choirs and variously directed choirs at four area churches for more than 50 years. He collaborated with several area historians in co-authoring the book “Land of the Fox,” a history of Outagamie County.

Sager is survived by two daughters, Kristene and Ann, both of Appleton, a sister-in-law Marion Leisering, Appleton, his wife’s relatives Mary Kay Smith and her family and thousands of former students.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Music For All: Grant Helps Lawrence Launch New Community Outreach Project

Posted on: July 19th, 2014 by Rick Peterson

An Arts and Culture grant from unrestricted funds within the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region will enable Lawrence University to launch a new program to bring classical chamber music to children and populations who ordinarily do not participate.

The $16,700 grant will support the “Music for All: Connecting Musicians and Community” project, which will be directed by Lawrence Conservatory of Music faculty members Michael Mizrahi and Erin Lesser.

Michael-Mizrahi_newsblog

Michael Mizrahi, assistant professor of music

Working with three community partners — Riverview Gardens, the Fox Valley Warming Shelter and Appleton’s Jefferson Elementary School — Lawrence faculty and students will stage a series of classical music performances beginning this fall using interactive techniques to create deep, artistic connections in settings where such music is rarely heard.

The project will bring members of the New York City-based Decoda chamber music group to campus to help Lawrence students and faculty learn interactive performance methods, write scripts, create entry points into musical works and engage non-traditional audiences.

“I see this project as part of a musical renaissance in Appleton and beyond.”
    — Brian Pertl, dean of the conservatory of music

“We believe communities are made stronger through positive interaction and shared experiences,” said Mizrahi, a pianist who joined the Lawrence faculty in 2009 and also a member of Decoda. “We also believe that music has the power to connect people, transcend social barriers and provide meaningful emotional experiences. This project will facilitate active participation, conversation, engaged learning and meaningful connections among classical musicians and non-traditional audiences.”

The three community partners were targeted for the project because they represent diverse populations, including young children, “at-risk” teens, people experiencing homelessness, adults in job training programs and community garden members.

Approximately 1,000 individuals from FVWS and RVG, along with 200 students from Jefferson Elementary School, will benefit from increased access to live musical performance and interactive learning with this project.

Brian-Pertl_2_newsblog

Brian Pertl, dean of the conservatory of music

Brian Pertl, dean of the Lawrence Conservatory of Music, sees the Music for All: Connecting Musicians and Community” initiative meshing perfectly with the conservatory’s core belief that music is for everyone and it can change lives in profound ways.

“This projects puts our philosophy into action so our students can figure out how best to give an audience entrance points into the music and then go out and actively engage the community in the wonder and beauty of the music,” said Pertl. “Music, and particularly classical music, should not be treated like some revered museum piece to be passively stared at through a dusty glass case. This project allows our faculty and students to find new ways to actively engage audiences from schools to warming shelters to concert halls in a meaningful, moving dialogue with the music. I see this project as part of a musical renaissance in Appleton and beyond.”

Approximately a dozen concerts are planned at the three partner sites during the 2014-15 academic year, most of which will be free and open to the public.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Lawrence Fund Enjoys Record-Breaking Year

Posted on: July 16th, 2014 by Rick Peterson

Lawrence University alumni and friends rewarded first-year President Mark Burstein with a special present — a record-setting fundraising total.

Classroom_Annual Fund_newsblog

The Lawrence Fund provides essential support for virtually all aspects of a student’s education, including scientific equipment such as this re-circulating flume for the geology department.

But the real beneficiaries are Lawrence’s students.

For the recently completed 2013-14 fiscal year, the college raised an institutional record $3.7 million for the Lawrence Fund, breaking the previous mark of $3,647,259 set in 2008-09.

The Lawrence Fund, the college’s annual giving program, provides close to 10 percent of the annual operating budget and helps bridge the gap between what students pay in tuition and actual operating costs. The Lawrence Fund and endowment earnings help reduce each student’s tuition by more than $10,000 per year, provide much-needed support for everything from scholarships and classroom resources to athletic equipment and sheet music for conservatory students.

Lawrence’s overall fundraising for the 2013-14 fiscal year totaled $17,681,384, the sixth-most in school history.

“This past fiscal year’s record-setting Lawrence Fund total is testament to our alumni’s loyal support of the college’s mission. I’m humbled by the generosity of the 10,308 individual donors who gave to Lawrence last year,” said Burstein, who marked the end of his inaugural year as president June 30. Earlier this year, Forbes ranked Lawrence highest of any college or university in Wisconsin on its 2014 Grateful Grads Index.

Helping the Lawrence Fund establish an institutional all-time high was a record-setting gift of $804,817 by members of the Class of 1964, the most ever by a 50th reunion class.

Lawrence also added 90 new members in the past fiscal year to its Legacy Circle, the college’s planned giving program. It was the most new members in a single year since 2000 and raised the program’s total to a record 907 members.

“Making Lawrence more affordable is among our highest priorities,” said Burstein. “Support for the Lawrence Fund assures students and families from all incomes that a Lawrence education remains accessible at a time when they have less resources to support their children in college. No other form of giving has a more direct and meaningful impact on our students.”

For the second year in a row, the Lawrence Fund enjoyed 100 percent participation from all 30 members of the Lawrence Board of Trustees as well as all 35 members of the Lawrence University Alumni Association Board of Directors. Collectively, they contributed a total of $587,986 — nearly 16 percent — to the fund’s overall total.

Among Lawrence’s 20,500 alumni, nearly 36 percent contributed to Lawrence’s overall fundraising efforts in the past fiscal year. According to the New York City-based Council for Aid to Education’s most recent Voluntary Support of Education Report, private baccalaureate institutions averaged 20.1 percent alumni participation in 2012-13 (the most recent year for which figures are available.)

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Lawrence Welcomes Student Visits July 14-19 for Wisconsin Private College Week

Posted on: July 11th, 2014 by Rick Peterson

Lawrence University will waive its $40 application fee for any students visiting the campus the week of July 14-19 as it joins 22 other Wisconsin private, nonprofit colleges and universities participating in Wisconsin Private College Week.

Tours of the Lawrence campus for prospective students and their families will be offered during Wisconsin Private College Week.

Tours of the Lawrence campus for prospective students and their families will be offered during Wisconsin Private College Week.

During Wisconsin Private College Week, students are encouraged to take advantage of campus tours, meet with admission counselors and get answers to financial aid and scholarship information questions.

“When it comes to getting a feel for a college, nothing beats a campus tour,” says Ken Anselment, dean of admissions & financial aid. “You can see — and hear and feel — for yourself whether a college fits well with your sense of what you are looking for.”

Students also can register to win one of five $1,000 “Go Grants” during Wisconsin Private College Week. The grant would be applied toward tuition at Lawrence or one of the other 22 private, nonprofit colleges or universities in the state.

To schedule a visit, contact the Lawrence Admissions Office or call 920-832-6500.

Now in its 19th year, Wisconsin Private Colleges Week is sponsored by the Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence Featured in 2015 Edition of Fiske Guide to Colleges

Posted on: July 8th, 2014 by Rick Peterson

Calling it “an unpretentious school that can appeal to both the left and right side of students’ brains,” former New York Times education editor Edward Fiske included Lawrence University in his 31th edition of the nation’s “best and most interesting” colleges.

Fiske-Guide-Cover_newsblogThe Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 is a selective and systematic look at more than 300 colleges and universities in the United States, Canada and Great Britain. Described by USA Today as “the best college guide you can buy,” Fiske produces his guide annually as a resource for college-bound students and their families on which to base their educational choices.

Institutions selected for inclusion are profiled on a broad range of subjects, including student body, academics, social life, financial aid, campus setting, housing, food and extracurricular activities.

In the book’s profile of Lawrence, Fiske calls the college’s academic climate “intimate and intense.” Among his accolades he cites good relations between Lawrence and the city of Appleton, hails the student body’s wide-spread involvement with volunteerism and credits the college for its “eclectic approach to learning that attracts interested and interesting students from around the world.”

Fiske, who spent 17 years as education editor of the New York Times, also highlights the expertise of Lawrence’s faculty, the breadth of its off-campus study opportunities and Lawrence’s “pristine campus.”

In addition to individual institutional profiles, the Fiske Guide also features:

• Overlap school suggestions based on which colleges share the most common applications

• A list of schools where ACT and SAT scores are optional

• A preprofessional guide that outlines the best schools based on majors or course of study

• A sizing-yourself-up questionnaire designed to help students determine what kind of school is best for them

Fiske launched his guide as a tool to broaden students’ horizons about American higher education and help them select a college that best coincides with their particular needs, goals, interests, talents and personalities.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

 

 

 

 

Student Pianist Casey Kadlubowski Wins $1,000 Music Scholarship, Performs July 8

Posted on: July 5th, 2014 by Rick Peterson

Hours of hard work and practice time for Lawrence University senior Casey Kadlubowski have been rewarded with a $1,000 scholarship and a public recital.

Piano performance major Casey Kadlubowski performs a free recital July 8 in Menomonie, Mich.

Piano performance major Casey Kadlubowski performs a free recital July 8 in Menominee, Mich.

Kadlubowski, a piano performance major from Marinette, performs Tuesday, July 8 at the Spies Public Library in Menominee, Mich., as the winner of the 2014 Menominee Area Arts Council (MAAC) John B. Henes Scholarship Award.

Her 40-minute free recital begins at 4:30 p.m. and will include works by Bartok, Beethoven, DeBussy and Faure.

She is a student in the piano studio of Assistant Professor Michael Mizrahi.

The $1,000 scholarship competition is open to incoming and current college students from the Marinette and Menominee area specializing in either visual or performing arts. Selection is based on letters of recommendation from both a current professor and member of the hometown community as well as a CD or DVD music portfolio of the student’s work.

Founded in 1957, the MAAC seeks to promote, educate, present and encourage support of arts in the local communities. In 2013, they established the John B. Henes Scholarship award, named after one its founders, in order to continue their mission and encourage growth of local young artists.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Six Tenure-Track Appointments Joining the Lawrence Faculty This Fall

Posted on: July 1st, 2014 by Rick Peterson

With research interests ranging from poetry on the interconnection of war and religion to evaluating risk in rural-to-urban migration in Indonesia, six new tenure-track faculty members will join Lawrence University for the start of the 2014-2015 academic years year.

The departments of English, economics, anthropology, mathematics and theatre arts welcome new assistant professors as colleagues, some of whom are already familiar faces at Lawrence.

The new faculty appointments include: Hillary Caruthers and Jonathan Lhost (economics); Adam Loy (statistics); Lavanya Proctor (anthropology); Keith Pitts (theatre arts); and Melissa Range (English). They join Amy Abugo Ongiri and Copeland Woodruff, who were named to the endowed faculty positions of Jill Beck Professor/Director of Film Studies and Director of Opera Studies, respectively, earlier this year.

“We are extremely pleased with all of the persons who have been appointed to tenure-track positions at Lawrence,” said David Burrows, provost and dean of the faculty. “Each one is energetic, talented and devoted to the ideals of liberal education. They will continue Lawrence’s tradition of building the excellence of the university on a foundation of highly qualified faculty who excel at student-centered education.”

Hillary Caruthers_newsblog

Hillary Caruthers, assistant professor of economics

• Hillary Caruthers, economics

Caruthers spent the  2013-14 academic year as a visiting assistant professor of economics at the Campbell School of Business at Berry College in Georgia. She also spent two years as a staff leader at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Business Learning Center and held a visiting instructor appointment at Vietnam’s Hanoi University of Agriculture in 2011. A specialist in developmental economics, her research interests include labor migration, risk, applied microeconomics and East and Southeast Asian studies, especially the role of risk in rural-to-urban migration in Indonesia. She earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from Brigham Young University and a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in agricultural and applied economics from UW-Madison.

Jonatham Lhost_HR_newsblog

Jonathan Lhost, assistant professor of economics

• Jonathan Lhost, economics

Lhost earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from Amherst College and a master’s and doctoral degree in economics from the University of Texas-Austin. As an assistant instructor of economics at UT-Austin, Lhost was awarded the university’s Graduate Teaching Scholars Scholarship and Seminar Certificate. His research interests include industrial organization, game theory and microeconomics. He has delivered presentations on the effectiveness of clicker technology in introductory economics and has written papers on topics ranging from the effects of merchants placing surcharges on transactions to the effects of spectrum acquisition on wireless carriers.

Adam Loy, assistant professor of mathematics

Adam Loy, assistant professor of mathematics

• Adam Loy, mathematics

Loy spent the 2013-14 academic year as a visiting assistant professor of statistics at Lawrence. His scholarship interests focus on mixed and hierarchical linear models as well as utilizing statistical methods to solve engineering and physical science problems. He has led multiple workshops on the R programming language and has delivered more than a dozen presentations on topics ranging from visually monitoring data streams to on-time flight performance in the United States. Loy earned a bachelor’s degree in mathematics/statistics at Luther College and earned both a master’s degree and Ph.D. in statistics from Iowa State University, where he served as a consultant for Statistics in the Community (StatCom), which provides pro bono statistical advice and expertise to area nonprofit organizations.

• Keith Pitts, theatre arts

Keith Pitts, assistant professor of theatre arts

Keith Pitts, assistant professor of theatre arts

A member of Lawrence’s theatre arts department since 2012, Pitts has served as set design and staging coordinator and well as department lecturer. He has worked on six Lawrence productions, including designing the set for this year’s play and opera versions of “Street Scene.” Prior to Lawrence, Pitts spent seven years teaching at Columbia College Chicago and three years as summer lab instructor at the University of Chicago Laboratory School. His extensive experience includes set design work on more than 85 productions at four universities and nearly 20 regional and professional theatres throughout Wisconsin and Illinois, including the Milwaukee Repertory Theatre and Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre. He earned a bachelor’s degree in technical theatre from Sam Houston State University and a master’s degree in theatre design from Northwestern University.

• Lavanya Proctor, anthropology

Lavanya Proctor, assistant professor of anthropology

Lavanya Proctor, assistant professor of anthropology

Proctor returns to Lawrence after spending 2010-2012 here, first as a visiting assistant professor and then as a Schmidt post-doctoral Fellow. She rejoins the faculty from SUNY-Buffalo State, where she was a lecturer in the anthropology department for two years. She is currently completing a book entitled “An Embattled Education: Language, Class and Mobility in New Delhi.” The recipient of an American Anthropological Association Leadership Fellow position in 2013, Proctor has focused her scholarship interests on linguistic anthropology, gender, class, education and India. She earned a bachelor’s and two master’s degrees in sociology at the University of Delhi as well as a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Iowa.

Melissa Range_newsblog

Melissa Range, assistant professor of English

• Melissa Range, English

Range received her Ph.D. in English and creative writing from the University of Missouri. She has been the recipient of several national prizes in creative writing for poetry, including the 2011 Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Prize, and was recognized with the University of Missouri’s teaching award for creative writing in 2013. Range has conducted more than a dozen invited poetry readings, has written numerous journal publications and is the author of the book “Horse and Rider: Poems,” which centers on violence and power in religion and the natural world. Range earned her bachelor’s degree in English and creative writing from the University of Tennessee, her master’s degree in creative writing from Old Dominion University and also holds a master of theological studies from the Chandler School of Theology at Emory University.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.