Lawrence featured in 2017 edition of “Fiske Guide to Colleges”

Lawrence University once again has earned inclusion in the latest edition of former New York Times education editor Edward Fiske’s annual guide of the top Fiske-Guide-2017_newsblogcolleges and universities in the United States, Canada and Great Britain.

In his 2017 “Fiske Guide to Colleges,” the author offers a personal profile of Lawrence based on a broad range of subjects, including student body, academics, social life, financial aid, campus setting, housing, food and extracurricular activities.

Since its first edition in 1985, the annual “Fiske Guide to Colleges” has offered a selective, subjective and systematic look at approximately 300 of the “best and most interesting” schools as a resource for college-bound students, their parents and high school guidance counselors.

Fiske, who spent 17 years as education editor of the New York Times, praised Lawrence for its diversified approach to learning “that attracts interested and interesting students from around the world” in his 2017 guide.

He describes Lawrence as “an unpretentious school that appeals to both the left and right side of students’ brains” while citing the college’s “uncommon” physics program and “renowned” conservatory of music. Fiske’s profile highlights Lawrence’s commitment to student volunteerism, its “intense” academic climate and a social scene that is “as varied and eclectic as the students.”

Fiske-guide-2017_newsblog2According to Fiske, Lawrence is “easily” one of the country’s best colleges, in part for “its outstanding liberal arts curriculum, knowledgeable and caring faculty, an administration that treats students like adults and a charming country setting.”

Fiske launched his guide as a tool to broaden students’ horizons about American higher education and help them select a college that best coincides with their particular needs, goals, interests, talents and personalities.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Wriston Art Center galleries’ summer exhibition series features painters Lichtner and Grotenrath

The work of “Wisconsin’s first couple of painting” — Schomer Lichtner and Ruth Grotenrath — will be featured in Lawrence University’s third annual summer exhibition series at the Wriston Art Center galleries. The exhibition opens July 15 and runs through Aug 14.

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Schomer Lichtner, “Untitled,” 1980, screenprint, Collection of Lawrence University.

In conjunction with Appleton Downtown Inc.’s “Art on the Town” event, the Wriston galleries will be open Friday, July 15 from 6-9 p.m.

The galleries’ summer series is designed to engage the Fox Valley community in conversation about Midwest artists and artworks.

Married in 1934, Grotenrath (1912-1988) and Lichtner (1905-2006) became known as “Wisconsin’s first couple of painting” for their prolific work. First employed as artists by the Works Project Administration during the Depression, they painted Regionalist style murals in U.S. post offices throughout the Midwest. They later taught art and design for many years in Milwaukee.

Inspired by Japanese and Persian art and culture, many of Grotenrath’s still life paintings reflect her interest in intricate patterns, bold colors and playful shifts in perspective. Lichtner’s work reveals his interest in pastoral scenes, dance and the figure. He was especially fond of incorporating ballerinas and Holstein cows in his paintings and prints. They are often shown joyfully frolicking together in a Wisconsin meadow.

During the exhibition’s run, Lawrence will host a pair of Art@Noon tours, 20-minute guided tours of the exhibition, on Thursday, July 21 and Thursday, August 11.

The works featured in the exhibition “The Artwork of Ruth Grotenrath and Schomer Lichtner” were donated to Lawrence by the Kohler Foundation, Inc.

The Wriston Art Center galleries are free and open to the public Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, noon – 4 p.m.; closed Mondays. For more information, call 920-832-6890.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence names dean of spiritual and religious life

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Reverend Dr. Linda Morgan-Clement

Having already created one interfaith ministry at The College of Wooster, Reverend Dr. Linda Morgan-Clement is excited by the prospects of doing so again, this time at Lawrence University.

Morgan-Clement, currently chaplain and director of interfaith campus ministry at The College of Wooster in Ohio, has been named the first Julie Esch Hurvis Dean of Spiritual and Religious Life at Lawrence. The appointment is effective Sept. 1.

The endowed position was established earlier this year by a gift from 1960 Lawrence graduate Tom Hurvis in memory of his wife, Julie Esch Hurvis, a 1961 Lawrence graduate who died in July, 2015. Both were devoted members of the Bahá’í faith and strongly believed in the power of spirituality.

Designed to further enhance the transformative experience a Lawrence education provides, the new leadership position will be dedicated to reinforcing a welcoming and supportive community environment for spiritual and religious exploration and expression of all faiths, beliefs and religious traditions.

Morgan-Clement will report to Nancy Truesdell, vice president for student affairs and serve on the president’s committee on wellness and recreation and the president’s committee on diversity affairs.

“When I visited Lawrence, I was very excited and energized by the opportunity to collaborate with the folks I met with during the interview process,” said Morgan-Clement, who started interfaith services and programming at Wooster in 1996. “There seemed to be a culture of ‘Let’s figure out what we need to do and then how to do it.’ A can-do culture. I’m very excited about creating with them, in partnership.

“To create something new is pretty unusual in a lifetime. It’s what got me to Wooster originally,” she added. “The opportunity for flexible creativity and the chance to develop depth in programs and services has kept me at Wooster for 20 years. To be able to do that twice in a lifetime is an amazing opportunity.”

Linda-Morgan-Clement_casual1_newsblogWisconsin ties also played a role in her decision to accept Lawrence’s offer.

Born in Hong Kong, Morgan-Clement, was adopted by an American family whose father was a Presbyterian minister. She spent most of her formative years living in Wisconsin, first in Oshkosh and then in Sheboygan until she graduated from Carroll University in Waukesha. Her husband, Mike, also grew up in Sheboygan, which is also Julie Esch Hurvis’ hometown.

“I am beyond delighted that Linda will be joining us as our very first Julie Esch Hurvis Dean for Spiritual and Religious Life,” said Truesdell. “She brings relevant experience and obvious passion for this type of work and embodies the caring and contemplative personality that reminds us of Julie. All of the finalist candidates were very impressed by the fact the position is funded through a very special endowment which identifies both donor and college commitment to this area of student development that has largely been unexplored at Lawrence. I have every confidence the entire campus and local community will embrace and assist Linda as she brings focus to an important element of campus life.”

Martyn Smith, associate professor of religious studies and a member of the search committee, said there was much to like about Morgan-Clement.

“Collectively, we thought Linda will be someone who can address the spiritual questions of everyone on campus —students, faculty and staff — but also encourage those who are traditionally religious and who don’t feel they have a home,” said Smith. “She talked about ‘brave spaces’ where people with different outlooks and from different traditions could learn to hear each other and interact with each other. She was clear this position would not be about letting everyone have their own private corner, but that she would look to have people interact. We can’t wait to see this position take shape.”

As a member of the university’s senior staff, Morgan-Clement’s duties will include serving as the face and voice of religious and spiritual life at Lawrence. She will be responsible for providing spiritual leadership and connecting the Lawrence community through campus ceremonies, religious traditions, interfaith services and celebrations. She also will oversee the Volunteer and Community Service Center staff and operations.

Morgan-Clement sees her role as an opportunity to break the traditional understanding of what spiritual and religious life might mean in popular U.S. culture.Linda-Morgan-Clement_casual_newblog

“I hope to reach everyone in some way, regardless of any belief system, religious or spiritual background,” she said. “I’m excited the position is connected with service. My vision is to help people shift from being human doers, with a focus on resume creation and what we do that defines us, to human beings, with a focus on the large questions of purpose and meaning, and growth and relationship with others. It doesn’t matter whether we know them or not. The relationship question includes the environment. I think we learn how to engage these big questions and relationships best through experience and service.”

Nauman Khan, a sophomore from Lahore, Pakistan, sees the new dean’s position as vital to promoting religious sensitivity on campus.

“Raised in a South Asian Muslim culture where religion was given a lot of importance, I was very surprised to see how religious teachings were not included in discussions around college campuses in the United States,” said Khan. “With a rising number of people coming to Lawrence from different cultures, it is very important for the institution to increase awareness about religion and spirituality.”

Sophomore John Newhall, one of three students on the search committee, is confident Morgan-Clement “will enhance the spiritual environment at Lawrence greatly.”

“Having served as campus minister at the College of Wooster for two decades, she has a deep understanding of the liberal arts,” said Newhall, a religious studies and film studies major who is working to reconstruct Lawrence’s Unitarian Universalist group on campus. “It’s clear from her engagement at Wooster she will be active and present throughout the campus, from community service, volunteer work and social justice work through to spiritual, academic and general campus life.”

Senior Elana Lambert, who also served on the search committee, sees the new dean as a valuable asset to campus life.

“As one of the co-presidents of Hillel, I think it is going to be really important to be able to go to Rev. Morgan-Clement for support when solving problems or advice when planning events and helping us to expand our organization,” said Lambert.

“My vision is to help people shift from being human doers, with a focus on resume creation and what we do that defines us, to human beings, with a focus on the large questions of purpose and meaning, and growth and relationship with others.”
     — Reverend Dr. Linda Morgan-Clement

Morgan-Clement sees the role of spiritual advisor becoming increasingly important on college campuses these days because of expanding diversity in terms of beliefs, socioeconomic status, race, world views and cultural backgrounds.

“It’s critical that higher education, which talks about holistic education, represents this conversation because it’s so misunderstood,” said Morgan-Clement. “National research shows students, faculty, everybody, domestically and internationally, is trying to come to grips with the larger spiritual question. For an institution to give someone the responsibility, a person and a place that says, ‘It’s alright, in fact we encourage you to wrestle with questions of meaning and purpose,’ I think that’s essential. This position is one more component to that kaleidoscope of really creating a learning community.”

Morgan-Clement earned a bachelor’s degree from Carroll University in 1980, a master of divinity degree from Chicago’s McCormick Theological Seminary in 1984 and a doctor of ministry degree from the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary in 2005.

She began her career working for the Presbytery of Milwaukee, where she organized the congregation for the Stony Hills Presbyterian Church in Germantown. She also served as an associate pastor of the Brookfield Presbyterian Church. Prior to her appointment at Wooster, Morgan-Clement spent eight years as one of several associate executives of the Presbyterian Church’s Synod of the Northeast in Syracuse, N.Y.

She has been the recipient of numerous grants and awards, including a nearly $2 million grant from the Lilly Endowment to establish a program for theological exploration of vocation at Wooster. Among several published works she’s written, she contributed the chapter “Betwixt and Between: Interstitial Dialogue, Identity and Mending on a College Campus” to the 2013 book “College and University Chaplaincy in the 21st Century.”

Married with two daughters, her husband is a chemist at Ashland University while her daughters, Antonia and Morgan, are graduates of Wooster and Allegheny College, respectively.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Academic boot camp: Lawrence hosts pre-college workshop for Native Americans

Nearly 90 Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian students will spend a week on the Lawrence University campus July 9-15 for a five-day, pre-college workshop coordinated by College Horizons, a New Mexico-based non-profit organization that works to increase the number of these students who succeed in college.

Representing 21 states and 42 tribes, students from as far away as Kamuela, Hawaii, Metlakatla, Alaska and Belmont, Mass., will participate in an “academic boot camp” designed to assist them in the college search process.College-Horizons_newsblog

This will be Lawrence’s third time serving as host of the program since 2008. Lawrence is one of 46 partner colleges working with College Horizons.

“We’re looking forward to welcoming our friends from College Horizons back to Lawrence,” said Ken Anselment, dean of admissions and financial aid. “It’s an extraordinary blend of people who will be together on campus and in Appleton for several days.”

Founded in 1998, the week’s programming will feature college and high school counselors, admission officers, essay specialists and tribal leaders who will work individually with the 86 participating students and lead small group sessions on topics ranging from “Overview of the ACT/SAT,” “Financial Aid & Scholarships: How Can I Afford College?” and “Native Students and College.”

The workshop is designed to assist Native American students in developing a list of appropriate colleges to consider, prepare a winning application, write a memorable essay, maximize their ACT or SAT scores and navigate the financial aid/scholarship maze.  At the end of the week, students leave with a completed college application and a list of colleges with which they are likely to be good matches.

Najma Osman from Lawrence’s admissions office will be joined by representatives from 33 of the nation’s best colleges and universities — Brown, Caltech, Dartmouth, Harvard, MIT, Notre Dame, Princeton, Stanford and Yale among them — who will be on hand to assist the students.

Since its inception, more than 2,800 students have participated in College Horizons workshops with impressive results. Ninety-nine percent of those students have been admitted to college, 95% matriculate onto a four-year institution and 85% have graduated college within five years.

Four past participants of a College Horizon summer workshop are current students at Lawrence.

Anselment called Lawrence’s participation in the College Horizons program “a natural fit” given the college’s very first class in 1849 included 13 members of the Oneida Nation.

“That these students and counselors will all be here, living on campus during a beautiful Wisconsin summer, is a real bonus for all of us,” said Anselment.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence University names Kimberly Barrett VP for diversity, inclusion

As an educator, Dr. Kimberly Barrett sees diversity as a critical piece of a liberal education.

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Kimberly Barrett

Barrett brings the perspective of 25 years of working with students, faculty and community members to promote learning, student development, social justice and diversity to Lawrence University as its newly appointed vice president for diversity and inclusion and associate dean of the faculty.

Currently the vice president for multicultural affairs and community engagement at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio, Barrett will assume the duties of the newly created position beginning Aug. 22.

Reporting to both the president and the provost, Barrett will work collaboratively with faculty, staff, students, alumni, and external constituents to advance Lawrence’s commitment to all aspects of diversity and inclusion. She will be responsible for developing, facilitating and assessing programs and campus/community-wide initiatives to cultivate a more inclusive campus culture.

Additionally, Barrett’s responsibilities include enhancing the diversity of the faculty, faculty development, especially in areas of inclusive pedagogy, and affirming the educational importance of diversity in educational programs.

“Dr. Barrett is an energetic and thoughtful leader who will help Lawrence realize its mission through enhancing diversity and inclusion,” said David Burrows, provost and dean of the faculty. “Her experience and dedication are extremely impressive. I look forward to working with her on faculty development, inclusive pedagogy and recruitment of new faculty members. Her appointment is an important, positive step for Lawrence.”

Barrett, 52, said Lawrence’s mission was among the primary reasons she was interested in the position.

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Lawrence’s Diversity Center provides a welcoming place for students to engage with cultural competency and build a more inclusive community.

“Having attended a small, private liberal arts school myself as an undergraduate, I’ve always had a sense of loyalty and commitment to providing a liberal education to students,” said Barrett, who earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology at Pfeiffer College in North Carolina. She also holds a master’s degree in clinical psychology at Murray State University and earned a doctorate in higher education administration at Southern Illinois University.

“I think that’s the type of education that prepares students best for the ambiguity and opportunities that exist in the ever-changing, very diverse global society in which we live. Being able to pursue my passion that is diversity and social justice work at a school like Lawrence that is dedicated to those principles just seemed like an ideal situation.”

Barrett, who has been at Wright State since 2012, says society in general and higher education specifically, is facing new challenges in dealing with civil rights and social justice.

“While cultural events and celebrations are an important way to promote diversity and inclusion, they are not sufficient to bring about the fundamental change we are trying to create. In order to achieve inclusive excellence in higher education we must change the way we do things every day.”
— Kimberly Barrett

“We’re in a new phase in terms of creating a society in which everyone can reach their full potential and in which there is really equity and equal opportunity for everyone,” said Barrett, a native of Fort Jackson, S.C. “The challenges facing Lawrence are the same issues facing higher education in general. It is a heightened awareness of the ways in which our society has fallen short in providing equal opportunity, justice and paths to success for all. It is a challenge because it causes discontent and disruption but also it provides a unique opportunity for significant and lasting change.

‘“I’ve been very impressed with President Burstein and his commitment to these issues in terms of policy and administration but also personally,” Barrett added. “Those of us who do this work have to ‘walk the talk’ in our lives every day. I get the impression that he does that.”

Kevin Buckhalton Jr., one of three students who served on the search committee, sees Barrett’s appointment as “a huge asset” for the university.

“She has an amazing background with not only racial diversity, but a plethora of other things that affect students on a college campus,” said Buckhalton, a senior from St. Louis Park, Minn. “She has experience working with counseling services and with LGBTQ students. I see her making an impact on all different constituencies in different ways. I see her bridging the gap between administration and students but also the larger community and Lawrence.”

Barrett said her first task upon arriving in August will be to listen and establish policies to ensure everyone has a voice in setting university priorities.

Kimberly-Barrett_newsblog2“While cultural events and celebrations are an important way to promote diversity and inclusion, they are not sufficient to bring about the fundamental change we are trying to create,” said Barrett. “In order to achieve inclusive excellence in higher education we must change the way we do things every day. We must examine our policies and guidelines to ensure that they help us take an equity-minded approach to our work. This will ensure that each of us helps Lawrence become a community that provides equal opportunity so that all students, faculty and staff can reach their unique potential.”

Matthew Stoneking, associate professor of physics and a member of the search committee, said Barrett’s approach and breadth of experience stood out among the candidates for both parts of her job title.

“She has a wealth of experience at a number of different types of institutions of higher education in administrative leadership and student affairs roles. I’m very confident that Dr. Barrett will help sharpen our vision and goals surrounding inclusivity and will work effectively and collaboratively with Lawrence faculty, students, staff, administrators and members of the Appleton community to make positive changes.”

Kathy Flores, diversity coordinator for the City of Appleton, who met Barrett during the interview process, sees her appointment benefiting the community beyond the campus borders.

““I’m excited to welcome Dr. Barrett to Appleton,” said Flores. “Her wide breadth of experience is not only an asset to Lawrence University, but to the whole Appleton community. Along with her vast set of skills, she brings a valued reputation of community engagement. I treasure the partnership we have already embarked upon with Lawrence around diversity and inclusion issues and I look forward to working with this new colleague as we strive to make Appleton a more welcoming place for all students.”

Lawrence’s location was also a draw for Barrett, who has both professional and personal ties to Wisconsin. She spent five years (2003-08) as associate vice chancellor of student development and diversity at UW-Eau Claire. Her son, Terrance, is a UW-Parkside graduate and lives in Madison with his wife Melissa.

Prior to Wright State, Barrett was the vice president for student affairs at the University of Montevallo in Alabama from 2008-12. Previous appointments included director of multicultural affairs at the State University of New York-Potsdam, director of the women’s center at Murray State in Kentucky, vice provost at Lakehead University in Ontario, Canada and associate provost/dean of students at Southeast Missouri State University.

Her husband, Terry Barrett, is an emeritus professor of psychology at Murray State University.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Voice teacher Karen Leigh-Post promoted to rank of professor

Lawrence University voice teacher Karen Leigh-Post has been promoted to rank of professor by the college’s Board of Trustees. Leigh-Post joined Lawrence’s Conservatory of Music in 1996.

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Karen Leigh-Post ’79

She has conducted extensive research in cognitive neuroscience and perceptual motor psychology, which she chronicled in her 2014 book “Mind-Body Awareness for Singers: Unleashing Optimal Performance. She will deliver the talk “The Brain, Music and Optimal Performance” in July at the 2016 national conference of the National Association of Teachers of Singing in Chicago.

As a performing mezzo soprano, Leigh-Post’s singing has been recognized with numerous honors. She is a two-time winner of both the District Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions and the Metropolitan Opera’s Regional Outstanding Mezzo Award. She has performed more than two dozen roles, ranging from the titular character in Bizet’s “Carmen” to Anita in “West Side Story” and Venus in Wagner’s “Tannhäuser” at leading opera venues throughout the country and abroad.

“In addition to a providing wonderful voice concerts, Dr. Leigh-Post has been a pioneer in cognitive analyses of musical performance,” said David Burrows, provost and dean of the faculty. “She has developed influential and important concepts about performance that will have a lasting impact in the area.”

A 1979 Lawrence graduate, Leigh-Post earned a bachelor’s degree in vocal performance/choral education, studying under current voice professor Ken Bozeman. She also earned a master’s degree in vocal performance/pedagogy from the University of Arizona and a doctor of musical arts in vocal performance from Rutgers University, where she studied with renowned voice teacher Shirlee Emmons, a 1944 Lawrence graduate.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Two Academy of Music Girl Choir singers to represent Wisconsin at national convention

A pair of singers from the Lawrence Academy of Music Girl Choir will represent Wisconsin at the 2016 “Let Freedom SING!” Girlchoir National Convention.

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Elena Anderla

Elena Anderla of Appleton and Haley Corcoran of Kaukauna will serve as singer delegates at the six-day choral festival July 24-29 in Philadelphia. The festival will be held at the same time in the same city as the Democratic National Convention.

“The fact that these two conventions are taking place at the same time is no coincidence,” said Steven Fisher, founder and artistic director of the “Let Freedom SING!” festival. “In presidential election seasons, I, like most Americans, grow weary of partisan politics dividing us as a country. It seemed like a perfect opportunity to showcase choral music and its extraordinary ability to quite literally unite all 50 states.”

Convention organizers asked only one youth choir from each state to send delegates to the convention according to Karen Bruno, director of the Academy of Music, artisitic director of the Girl Choir program and conductor of the Girl Choir Bel Canto singers.

“We are honored to know that our Girl Choir program has been recognized nationally for its outstanding musicianship, and thrilled that two of our singers have the opportunity to participate in this unique event,” said Bruno.

Anderla, a senior Xavier High School, has been a member of the Lawrence Academy Girl Choir for eight years.

“I’m honored to have been chosen for this amazing experience to sing with new voices and a new director in Philadelphia for a week,” said Anderla. “This convention will be a great way to show the country that music truly has the power to unite us despite our many different backgrounds.”

“We are honored to know that our Girl Choir program has been recognized nationally for its outstanding musicianship, and thrilled that two of our singers have the opportunity to participate in this unique event.”
— Karen Bruno

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Haley Corcoran

Corcoran, who has sung with the Girl Choir program the past six years, is a junior at Kaukauna High School.

“Music is a big part of my life and I am honored to be selected to represent Wisconsin at the convention,” said Corcoran. “I am most looking forward to meeting new people who share the same passions as I do. I’m sure this will be the highlight of my high school music career. I I’m excited for this opportunity.”

Like all of the singer delegates, Anderla and Corcoran will need to learn a repertoire of 10 songs before they arrive in Philadelphia. In addition to a culminating “Let Freedom SING!”  concert on July 27 at Arcadia University, Anderla and Corcoran will participate in other “pop up” performance at historic sites throughout Philadelphia.

“It will be a magical choral moment at the opening of the convention when these young women get to hear for the first time what 50 states singing together sounds like,” said Fisher. “As a founder of an organization that aims to transform the lives of young people through the power of making music together, I’m keenly aware of how choral music empowers young women in a unique way when they have the opportunity to make it surround by other girls, helping them to develop into strong, confident women who are at the ready to literally let their voices be heard.”

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Lawrence earns gold, silver awards in annual CASE competition for student recruitment publications

For the second year in a row, Lawrence University earned gold honors in the annual Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) Circle of Excellence competition.CASE-Gold-Winner-badge

Lawrence was awarded honors for its recruitment package of brochures entitled “The Power of Engaged Learning at Lawrence University” and its student recruitment mailer “Don’t Just Finish. Flourish.

CASE awards recognize superior accomplishments that have lasting impact, demonstrate the highest level of professionalism and deliver exceptional results.

“I’m thrilled to be recognized for our recruitment materials,” said Craig Gagnon, associate vice president of communications, who oversaw the publications’ production. “The awards not only recognize outstanding design and execution, but also the consistent application of our positioning strategy in a creative concept that extends throughout all our admissions materials.

“Of course, the ultimate goal is not to win awards but to reinforce the Lawrence reputation and attract applications from qualified students,” Gagnon added. “The fact that we set a record for applications is compelling evidence that we have a message that resonates with our prospective students.”

Lawrence enjoyed a 20 percent increase in applications after launching the package, setting an institutional record.CASE Award_newsblog

CASE judges noted that, “the brochures each promote a single strong message…headlines clearly differentiate between a passive education and the active, engaged learning experience provided at Lawrence.”

Judges also noted, “the package was also budget-friendly; with writing and design done in-house, costs were limited to printing and postage.”

The award-winning publications were the result of a collaborative effort between the communications and admissions offices. In addition to Gagnon, who conducted and analyzed the research that led to the campaign concept, art director Matt Schmeltzer designed the multi-piece program, Ken Anselment, dean of admissions and financial aid, wrote the majority of the body copy and Lawrence photographers Liz Boutelle and Rachel Crowl provided campus images.

The 2016 CASE competition attracted a record 3,350 entries from 713 higher education U.S. and international institutions. Winners are selected by peer professionals as well as professionals from outside of education.

Lawrence won a Grand Gold award, CASE’s highest honor, in 2015 in the general information video category for “The Rabbit’s Nose,” a spoken-word piece, written and performed by 2014 graduate Shea Love and produced by Crowl.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Milwaukee-Downer College legacy honored, preserved in renamed building

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The one-time Jason Downer Commons now bears the name of long-time Milwaukee-Downer College trustee and benefactor Alice G. Chapman.

Lawrence University’s deep connections to Milwaukee-Downer College will be strengthened further by honoring Alice G. Chapman, a long-time trustee and benefactor of the former all-women’s college.

The original Jason Downer Commons, currently known as the Hurvis Center, is being renamed Alice G. Chapman Hall.

Located on the east end of campus, Chapman Hall is home to the Lawrence admissions office, the career center, the alumni and constituency engagement office and the film studies program.

“Renaming our building Alice G. Chapman Hall will underscore the valued connection between Lawrence University and the historic Milwaukee-Downer campus,” said Stacy Mara, associate vice president for development.

Highlighting the building is the beautifully hand-carved Alice Chapman Room, also known as the Teakwood Room. It was originally built by American artist and architect Lockwood de Forest in Chapman’s Milwaukee home and used as a music room. After Chapman died in 1935, the Teakwood Room was placed in Chapman Library on the Milwaukee-Downer campus in 1938 and used for receptions, poetry readings and chamber music.

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The Teakwood Room, a distinctive feature of the Milwaukee-Downer College campus, was moved to Lawrence after the 1964 consolidation and is now on the second floor of Chapman Hall.

When the consolidation was announced, members of the Milwaukee-Downer community asked that their beloved room be preserved. The room was carefully disassembled and stored in a warehouse until 1968 when it was reassembled at Lawrence in Downer Commons.

“The Chapman name has long been associated with Milwaukee Downer College and it is significantly fitting to reunite Chapman Hall and the Teakwood Room to perpetuate Downer at Lawrence,” said Marlene Widen, a 1955 Milwaukee-Downer graduate and 2013 recipient of the university’s Presidential Award for exemplary leadership and actions have contributed to the betterment of the entire Lawrence community. “Chapman Hall will serve as the east anchor to another beloved part of Downer, the recreated Hawthornden on the west end of campus.”

Born in Boston in 1853, Alice Greenwood Chapman grew up in Milwaukee, where her father, T. A. Chapman, ran Chapman’s Department Store. She attended Milwaukee Female College, a predecessor of Milwaukee-Downer, and served on Milwaukee-Downer’s Board of Trustees from 1906 until her death.

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Alice G. Chapman

Known as “an ardent lover of music,” Alice Chapman was an accomplished musician who also enjoyed composing. She was active with a numerous civic groups, including the Milwaukee Institute of Arts, the Visiting Nurses Association and the Children’s Hospital.

Chapman was a generous benefactor for Milwaukee-Downer, including a bequest that funded a new library building. After the consolidation with Lawrence, the Chapman Library became Chapman Hall and is now the Office of the Chancellor at UW-Milwaukee.

Originally completed in 1968, Downer Commons, which served as the campus’ primary dining center for 40 years, was named in honor of Judge Jason Downer, an associate justice of the Wisconsin Supreme Court from 1864-1867. He served as the president of the board of trustees (1866-1871; 1874-1878) for Wisconsin Female College in Fox Lake, a predecessor to Milwaukee-Downer College. When Downer died, he left a gift of $65,000 to the college and its name was changed to Downer College.

When the Warch Campus Center opened in 2009 and dining services moved there, Downer Commons was remodeled to accommodate offices and a state-of-the-art production studio for the university’s newly expanded film studies program, which was supported by a generous gift from the Hurvis family and the Caerus Foundation.

“Lawrence is exceedingly grateful for the Hurvis family’s flexibility in allowing us to make this name change,” said Mara. “Alice Chapman’s famous Teakwood Room has remained a constant fixture and notable highlight on campus throughout the life of the building. Alumni from Lawrence and Milwaukee-Downer associate the building with our Milwaukee-Downer history because of this special room.”

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A production studio is part of the Hurvis Film Studies Center in the lower level of Chapman Hall.

According to Mara, Lawrence will recognize the generosity and dedication of the Hurvis family and the Caerus Foundation by continuing to associate the Hurvis family name with the film studies program, which was their original intent, but not the building itself. The southeast portion of Chapman Hall that houses the film studies program will display the name “Hurvis Film Studies Center” on the outside of the building, with additional Hurvis Film Studies Center signage inside.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Welcome Back: Lawrence Reunion celebrates its graduates, honors five alumni

Nancy Mattson put her Lawrence University degree in economics to such good use, she earned recognition from the United States Navy.

Her work in 1987 as a financial advisor on a $3 billion vessel financing program for the U.S. Navy earned her one of the few Distinguished Public Service Awards bestowed by the Secretary of the Navy during the Reagan Administration.

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Nancy Mattson ’76

Mattson is one of five Lawrence graduates who will be honored Saturday, June 18 as part of the university’s annual alumni Reunion celebration. Each will be recognized at the Reunion Convocation at 10:30 a.m. in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel. The event is free and open to the public.

More than 1,000 alumni and guests from 43 states and five countries, including India, Italy and Romania, representing classes as early as 1940, are expected to return to campus.

Members of the Lawrence 50-Year Connection, a cohort of alumni who graduated at least 50 years ago, get Reunion activities started Wednesday evening June 15 with a reception and dinner and a series of panel presentations and small-group discussions on Thursday, June 16. A complete schedule of Reunion activities can be found here.

The 2016 awards and recipients are:

• Lucia Russell Briggs Distinguished Achievement Award — Nancy Mattson, Class of 1976, Novato, Calif. The award recognizes a Lawrence or Milwaukee-Downer graduate of more than 15 years for outstanding career achievement. The award honors the second president of Milwaukee-Downer College, one of the most beloved and influential figures in that college’s history.

 With more than has more than 35 years of commercial and investment banking experience, Mattson is the founder, managing director, executive vice president and chief financial officer of Argent Group Ltd., a boutique investment banking firm.

Prior to founding Argent in 1982, Mattson spent three years as a vice president with Bank of America. An expert in maritime finance, she has served as a member of the shipbuilding subcommittee of U.S. Marine Transportation System National Advisory Council for the U.S. Department of Transportation.

“I’m fond of saying Lawrence was a great place to ‘grow up,’” said Mattson. “Lawrence gave me the academic background I needed to succeed in my business career.  The liberal arts focus of the university meant that I was exposed to courses that I would not study in depth, but the study of which would enrich my life.

“Lawrence clearly helped me build a firm foundation for life and I believe that it is continuing to do the same for today’s Lawrentians,” Mattson added. “I am grateful to have had the opportunity to attend this truly outstanding university.”

After graduating from Lawrence, Mattson earned an MBA from the John M. Olin School of Business at Washington University, which recognized her with a distinguished alumni award in 1995.

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Curien Kurrien ’01

• Nathan M. Pusey Young Alumni Distinguished Achievement Award — Curien Kurrien, Class of 2001, Mumbai, India. The award recognizes Lawrence alumni of 15 years or less for significant contributions to, and achievements in, a career field. The award honors the 10th and youngest president of Lawrence and an exemplary figure in higher education in the 20th century.

In 2008, Kurrien became an important footnote within the vast publication empire of Condé Nast. At the age of 29, launched GQ India, becoming the youngest editor-in-chief in the publishing titan’s history. Since making its debut eight years ago, Kurrien has built the magazine into India’s leading men’s media brand.

Prior to heading GQ India, he worked as a reporter for The Indian Express, a daily newspaper. He also covered the music and nightlife scene for Time Out Mumbai magazine and wrote for Reuters, the international wire service, which brought his stories to The New York Times and Washington Post, among others.

“I only began to fully understand the value of my Lawrence education as a senior, when I magically started connecting the dots between ostensibly disparate fields, drawing from each discipline to strengthen my arguments in another,” Kurrien said. “These insights imbued me with precious confidence I’d never possessed before – a powerful force that I draw upon daily for my complex, creative, nuanced job as editor-in-chief of GQ India.”

“I returned home a year after I graduated,” Kurrien added. “By then the Lawrence liberal arts ideal had transformed and armed me with a unique outlook that allowed me to identify and capitalize on a range of opportunities in the new India.”

Kurrien earned a degree in government from Lawrence in 2001 and a post-graduate certificate in journalism from New York University.

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Timothy Burnside ’02

• The George B. Walter Service to Society Award — Timothy Anne Burnside, Class of 2002, Washington, D.C. The award recognizes an alumnus or alumna of Lawrence or Milwaukee-Downer who best exemplifies the ideals of a liberal education through its application to socially useful ends in the community, the nation or the world. This award honors George B. Walter ’36, faculty member, coach and dean of men, whose work at the college and beyond was guided by his conviction that every individual can and should make a positive difference in the world.

As a museum specialist at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, Burnside works with musicians, artists and others to build collections and develop exhibitions that offer complex representations of history and cultural expression.

She began her career in 2003 at the National Museum of American History where she launched that museum’s hip-hop collecting initiative. Among the numerous Smithsonian projects she has worked on was an exhibition on Harlem’s Apollo Theater. Burnside regularly presents at conferences and serves on the executive committee of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music.

“I’m lucky to have a career that combines the three things I studied at Lawrence, which I am grateful for every single day,” said Burnside. “I carry every life lesson and classroom experience from Lawrence with me, because those moments taught me how to be confident and not afraid of striving to do the work that I love.

“I learned humility and the importance of working towards a goal because of the good work being done, not because you would be rewarded. I came away from those four years without a plan for the rest of my life, but I knew that I would be ok.”

After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in English from Lawrence, Burnside earned a master’s degree in museum studies at Johns Hopkins University.

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Betty Barrett M-D ’55

• Gertrude Breithaupt Jupp Outstanding Service Award — Betty Barrett, Milwaukee-Downer Class of 1955, Macomb, Ill., and William Hochkammer, Class of 1966, Bloomfield Hills, Mich. The award recognizes an alumnus or alumna of Lawrence or Milwaukee-Downer after his/her 15th Cluster Reunion who has provided outstanding service to Lawrence. It honors Gertrude Breithaupt Jupp, voted Milwaukee-Downer alumna of the year in 1964 for her long-standing service to the college as president of the alumnae association board, class secretary and public relations officer.

Barrett has worked tirelessly to sustain the Milwaukee-Downer legacy after the former all-women’s college consolidated with Lawrence in 1964. Through the Betty Heistad Barrett Fund for Excellence in Civic Service, which she established with her late husband in 2010, Lawrence students are empowered to improve the world, grow as young professionals and explore the nonprofit sector.

Barrett has served on the Lawrence Alumni Association Board of Directors, numerous reunion committees and as a member of a working group for Lawrence’s 2005-11 More Light! campaign.

“‘With a heart full of love for our college’ is a line from the Milwaukee-Downer College alma mater that never fails to bring tears, even 62 years after the merger that formed Lawrence University,” said Barrett. “Downer lives on in the hearts and minds of its devoted alumnae. I am grateful that many of our traditions continue, most visibly the class colors.”

“Lawrence’s liberal arts program, fine professors, individualized education and small size  all make it a fine choice for many students,” Barrett added. “I appreciate coming to Lawrence to meet those students who are successors to me and my classmates. Milwaukee-Downer College lives on through these students.”

After earned a bachelor’s degree at M-D, Barrett earned a master’s degree in government from Marshall University.

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William Hochkammer ’66

Hochkammer, a health care attorney and partner in the Detroit law firm Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn LLP, served 22 years on Lawrence’s Board of Trustees, including as board chairman from 2005-07. He was recently re-elected to the board, becoming the first trustee in Lawrence history to complete his term limit and be invited to rejoin the board.

While on the board, Hochkammer was instrumental in the success of Lawrence’s $160 million “More Light!” campaign that ended in 2011 and served on the Presidential Search Committee that appointed Jill Beck as the university’s 15th president. He currently serves on the leadership team for Lawrence’s $75 million “Full Speed to Full Need” endowed scholarship campaign.

“Attending Lawrence was a life changing experience for me. It was instrumental to my transition from growing up on a Wisconsin farm, the first in my family to attend college, to completing law school and to a full and enjoyable life on both a personal and professional basis,” said Hochkammer. “While I valued my time as a student at Lawrence I didn’t then fully appreciate what I was gaining from my experience. As I had more life experiences, my appreciation for my Lawrence education continued to grow as I saw how well Lawrence had prepared me as a person.

“Today I see how strongly Lawrence is committed to its mission, how it continues to transform the lives of students and how it strives constantly to become even better at providing outstanding experiences to its students,” Hochkammer added.

After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in economics from Lawrence, Hochkammer earned a law degree from Northwestern University School of Law.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.