Tag: art

Painter Joseph Friebert featured in Wriston Art Center Galleries’ summer exhibition series

Joseph Friebert painting "Sunday Morning"
Joseph Friebert’s oil painting “Sunday Morning” is among the works in the latest Wriston Art Center Galleries exhibition.

Lawrence University’s fifth annual summer exhibition series at the Wriston Art Center Galleries features works by painter Joseph Friebert from Lawrence’s own permanent collection.

The exhibition opens July 13 and runs through Aug 19. A 20-minute guided Art @ Noon tour of the exhibition will be conducted July 19.

The Wriston Art Center galleries are free and open to the public Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, noon – 4 p.m.; closed Mondays.

Friebert, who died in 2002, used glazes and varnishes that allowed light to reflect back and produce a luminous effect in his work, reminiscent of Old Master techniques. His work often represents social concerns, a byproduct of growing up the son of a tailor and union organizer in a working class Jewish family. Having experienced the Great Depression, two world wars and the Cold War, much of his art is permeated with a sense of loss, sadness and vulnerability.

“Although Friebert’s artwork is often subdued in its tone and subject matter, he presents us with a vision of the world that is both contemplative and rendered with intense feeling,” said Beth Zinsli, director and curator of the Wriston Art Center Galleries. “A viewer will come away from his paintings with a new perspective on the urban landscape and its inhabitants.”

Joseph Friebert painting "The Funeral"
“The Funeral” will be part of the Joseph Friebert exhibition.

Born in Buffalo, N.Y., in 1908, Friebert and his family moved to Milwaukee when he was still an infant and he spent the rest of his life living there. Working as a pharmacist by day, he also took art classes at the Layton School of Art. He eventually earned a degree in art education from the Milwaukee State Teacher’s College in 1945 and a master of fine arts degree from UW-Madison. He joined the faculty at MSTC (now UW-Milwaukee) in 1946 and taught there until his retirement in 1976.

The Wriston Summer Exhibition Series is an annual program intended to engage the Fox Valley community in conversations about artworks and artists of the Midwest.

The Friebert exhibition is made possible by the Joseph and Betsy Ritz Friebert Family Partnership, the Kohler Foundation, Inc., and other generous donors who have contributed to Lawrence’s permanent collection.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Art professor Rob Neilson featured in exhibition at Madison’s Watrous Gallery

Works by Lawrence University sculptor Rob Neilson will be featured in an exhibition opening Friday, July 6 at the Wisconsin Academy’s James Watrous Gallery in Madison’s Overture Center for the Arts.

Rob Neilson sculpture entitled "Bi-Bully"
Rob Neilson’s “Bi-Bully” will be part of his “Pataphysical Portraits” exhibition.

The exhibition “Pataphysical Portraits” runs through Aug. 19. A free artists’ reception will be held Friday July 13 from 5-7 p.m. with an informal gallery talk delivered at 5:30 p.m.

In “Pataphysical Portraits,” Neilson exploits the traditional genre of portraiture busts in a way that combines iconography and incongruity.

Concentrating on the exchange between the idiosyncratic and collective readings of each figure’s image, Neilson explores the construction of identity and the space where the iconic encounters the absurd. His work asks what this reveals about how we see ourselves, what we value and the meaning we give to individual narratives.

Neilson, who joined the Lawrence art department in 2003, holds the Frederick R. Layton Professor of Art endowed chair. He has exhibited his sculpture, installations and drawings at galleries, museums, and alternative spaces nationally and internationally.

He has created public art commissions throughout the United States, including projects in California, Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, Nebraska, North Carolina, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin. Three of Neilson’s projects “You Are Here,” “We Are Here” and “Community Caryatids,” are featured in the Fox Cities Exhibition Center in downtown Appleton.

Rob Neilson sculpture Badly Bain Among the Kye
“Badly Bain Among the Kye (Robert Lambie 1760-1799” is one of the works in Rob Neilson’s “Pataphysical Portraits” exhibition.

A native of Detroit, Neilson earned a BFA degree in fine arts from the College for Creative Studies and an MFA in sculpture from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

The James Watrous Gallery is a program of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters, an independent, nonprofit organization that seeks to inspire discovery, illuminate creative work, and foster civil dialogue. The gallery’s primary focus is the work of contemporary Wisconsin visual artists. We also present exhibitions that explore the history of art in Wisconsin or topics that bridge the sciences, arts, and humanities. The gallery is free and open to the public.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

 

 

 

Works by student art majors featured in new Wriston Art Center Galleries exhibition

The creative talents of 12 Lawrence University student art majors will be showcased in the annual Senior Major Exhibition opening Friday, May 25 in the Wriston Art Center Galleries. The exhibition, which is free and open to the public, runs through July 1.A postcard promoting the 2018 Senior Art Show

Media in the exhibition include paintings, prints, photographs, ceramics, installations, and sculptures in various materials including wood, plaster, steel and 3D-printed PLA plastic.

“Several of this year’s senior art majors have merged their multidisciplinary interests and their studio practices,” said Beth Zinsli, director and curator of the Wriston galleries.  “Their works featured in the exhibition explore mathematical theorems, the history of science and invention, biodegradable plastics, the visualization of psychological and emotional states, and 3D printer programming.

An oil painting of Mme. C.J. Walker by Lawrence senior Aedan R. Gardill
Aedan Gardill’s oil painting “Innovating a Legacy: Mme. C.J. Walker” will be among the works in the 2018 Senior Art Show in the Wriston Art Center Galleries.

“Other students’ works delve deeply into the idea of memory and identity, examining the continued significance of childhood experiences like transnational adoption or the death of a loved one as they transition through college and into adulthood,” Zinsli added. “Sculpture in a variety of media is quite dominant this year, but there are excellent examples of photography, painting, printmaking, and mixed media pieces as well.”

The student exhibitors include: Eryn Blagg, Omaha, Neb.; Natalie Cash, Elgin, Ill.; Molly Froman, San Francisco, Calif.; Aedan Gardill, Waunakee; Susie Hendrix, Appleton; Emily Hunt, Aurora, N.Y.; Kori Looker, Weyauwega; Jake Ryan, Medford, Ore.; Penn Ryan, Madison; Elizabeth Utter-Limon, Milwaukee; Lizzy Weekes, Milton; and Rachael Wuensch, Reedsburg.

Wriston Art Center hours are Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Saturday-Sunday noon – 4 p.m. The galleries are closed Mondays. For more information, call 920-832-6621.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Faculty, contemporary prints, Japanese woodblock prints featured in new Wriston Art Center exhibition

The work of five Lawrence University studio art faculty members will be featured in the university’s latest Wriston Art Center Galleries exhibition.

A photo of the artwork "Boys & Bubs: Seasons of Change" by Benjamin Rinehart.
Benjamin Rinehart’s “Boys & Bubs: Seasons of Change” (2016) will be among the works in the Wriston Art Center’s faculty exhibition.

The faculty exhibition in the Kohler Gallery, one of three new shows, opens Friday, Jan. 13 at 6 p.m. with a free public reception. A performance by the Lawrence band We Go From Where We Know follows at 8 p.m. The exhibition runs through March 12.

The faculty exhibit includes painting, sculpture, video, ceramics, photography, and book-making by Tony Conrad, lecturer of art, Rob Neilson, Frederick R. Layton Professor of Art and associate professor of art, Benjamin Rinehart, associate professor of art, John Shimon, associate professor of art, and Meghan Sullivan, Uihlein Fellow of Studio Art. An exploration of portraiture in its various forms occupies a prominent place in this exhibition, the first faculty group show in the galleries in more than a decade.

“The exhibition is a stunning showcase of our studio art faculty’s current work,” said Beth Zinsli, curator and director of the Wriston Art Center Galleries. “It really highlights their skill, thoughtfulness and brilliance as working artists as well as teachers and mentors.”

A photo of the artwork "Couples" by Louise Bourgeoise.
“Couples” by Louise Bourgeoise is part of the “The Fine Print” exhibition, a selection of contemporary prints by women.

“The Fine Print” in the Hoffmaster Gallery features a selection of contemporary prints by women on loan from long-time art collector and 1963 Lawrence graduate Dr. Robert Dickens.  A prominent psychiatrist in Manitowoc, Dickens’ primary area of interest is late 20th and early 21st century works on paper. The exhibition feature works by such well-known artists as Louise Bourgeoise, Squeak Carnwath, Allison Saar and Frances Myers, among others, as well as a triptych by Jean Shinn — “Celadon Threads” — she created using digital embroidery.

The Leech Gallery features “Dreams of the Floating World: 15 Views of Tokugawa Japan,” 30 Japanese woodblock prints from Lawrence’s permanent collection that were selected and researched by Lawrence students in Assistant Professor of History Brigid Vance’s course “Early Modern Japan.” The exhibition is organized into three themes: portraits, nature and urban perspectives.

Through their work with the prints, the students learned about Japan’s Tokugawa period (1603-1868). They wrote explanatory texts for each work and framed the prints for the show. Woodblock printmaking tools will be part of the exhibition.

The Wriston Art Center galleries are free and open to the public Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday noon – 4 p.m.; closed Mondays. For more information on the exhibition, 920-832-6890.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

 

 

Wriston Art Center exhibition honors former Lawrence art professor

A photo of former Lawrence University art professor Arthur Thrall.
Arthur Thrall taught art at Lawrence from 1964 until his retirement in 1990.

 A celebration of former Lawrence University art professor Arthur Thrall’s skills and imagination as an award-winning printmaker and painter highlights the newest exhibition in Lawrence’s Wriston Art Center galleries.

Arthur Thrall: Tribute to a Master Artist” in the Kohler Gallery opens Friday, Sept. 23 at 6 p.m. with a free public reception. The exhibition runs through Nov. 23.

During a 26-year teaching career at Lawrence — Thrall retired in 1990 but remained an active artist in retirement — he established an international reputation for works inspired by sources as diverse as calligraphy and computers, music and microchips.

Covering three broad themes — calligraphy, musical notation and lyrical lines — the exhibition features a wide array of media and print-making processes, from intaglio and relief prints to gouache and oil paintings.

A video by professional photographer Mark Heffron, “Orchestrated Lines,” that documents Thrall creating the print “Confluence” will be shown during the exhibition, while the plate for that print and some of Thrall’s printmaking tools also will be displayed.

Beth Zinsli, director and curator of the Wriston Art Center galleries, called Thrall “a legend in the Wisconsin arts community.”

A photo of former Lawrence University art professor Arthur Thrall artwork in the "Tribute to a Master Artist" exhibition.
“Etude,” acrylic on canvas, will be one of Arthur Thrall’s works in the “Tribute to a Master Artist” exhibition.

“It’s an honor and a privilege to showcase this stunning array of Arthur’s complex and multilayer works in a variety of media,” said Zinsli. “I’m confident viewers will find his work aesthetically pleasing and intellectually engaging.”

His prints and paintings appeared in more than 500 exhibitions around the world and many found homes in the permanent collections of the British Museum, London’s Victoria and Albert Museum, the Tate Gallery, the Smithsonian Institute, the Library of Congress and the Chicago Art Institute, among others.

A native of Milwaukee, Thrall was one of 21 members of the Milwaukee-Downer College faculty who came to Lawrence in 1964 as part of the consolidation with the former all-women’s college. He died at the age of 88 in March, 2015.

During his career, Thrall was recognized by the art community with more than 75 awards, including the Lifetime Award from the Society of American Graphic Artists in New York in 2013. He also received the Museum of Wisconsin Art’s Wisconsin Visual Art Lifetime Achievement Award in 2011.

A photo of Shannon Sullivan's "Interractive Bubble Array" work in the exhibition "FACET."
Shannon Sullivan’s”Interactive Bubble Array” will be among the featured works in the exhibition “FACET.”

In addition to “Tribute to a Master Artist,” the Leech and Hoffmaster galleries host  “FACET: Diverse Works by Women in the West.” The show features five female artists from the American West — Renee Brown, Natalie Macellaio, Jessica McCambly, Lesli Robertson and Shannon Sullivan — who work with “heavy” sculpture materials, including metals, clay, concrete, wood and glass. Their work, reflecting deep consideration of the virtues and limitations of their chosen medium, references the natural world, including geologic, chemical and biological processes.

“FACET” includes Sullivan’s interactive piece “Interactive Bubble Array,” which visitors can manipulate (while wearing gloves).

The Wriston Art Center galleries are free and open to the public Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday noon – 4 p.m.; closed Mondays. For more information on the exhibition, 920-832-6890.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Wriston Art Center galleries’ summer exhibition series features painters Lichtner and Grotenrath

The work of “Wisconsin’s first couple of painting” — Schomer Lichtner and Ruth Grotenrath — will be featured in Lawrence University’s third annual summer exhibition series at the Wriston Art Center galleries. The exhibition opens July 15 and runs through Aug 14.

A photo of Schomer Lichtner screenprint "Untitled."
Schomer Lichtner, “Untitled,” 1980, screenprint, Collection of Lawrence University.

In conjunction with Appleton Downtown Inc.’s “Art on the Town” event, the Wriston galleries will be open Friday, July 15 from 6-9 p.m.

The galleries’ summer series is designed to engage the Fox Valley community in conversation about Midwest artists and artworks.

Married in 1934, Grotenrath (1912-1988) and Lichtner (1905-2006) became known as “Wisconsin’s first couple of painting” for their prolific work. First employed as artists by the Works Project Administration during the Depression, they painted Regionalist style murals in U.S. post offices throughout the Midwest. They later taught art and design for many years in Milwaukee.

Inspired by Japanese and Persian art and culture, many of Grotenrath’s still life paintings reflect her interest in intricate patterns, bold colors and playful shifts in perspective. Lichtner’s work reveals his interest in pastoral scenes, dance and the figure. He was especially fond of incorporating ballerinas and Holstein cows in his paintings and prints. They are often shown joyfully frolicking together in a Wisconsin meadow.

During the exhibition’s run, Lawrence will host a pair of Art@Noon tours, 20-minute guided tours of the exhibition, on Thursday, July 21 and Thursday, August 11.

The works featured in the exhibition “The Artwork of Ruth Grotenrath and Schomer Lichtner” were donated to Lawrence by the Kohler Foundation, Inc.

The Wriston Art Center galleries are free and open to the public Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, noon – 4 p.m.; closed Mondays. For more information, call 920-832-6890.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Three Wisconsin photographers featured in latest Wriston Art Center exhibition

University of Wisconsin Professor of Visual Studies Jill Casid delivers the opening lecture for the latest exhibition at Lawrence University’s Wriston Art Center Galleries Thursday, March 31 at 6 p.m. with a reception to follow. Both events are free and open to the public.

Kissing-on-Mainstreet_newsblog
Jill H. Casid, “Sylvia Beach Way, Princeton, NJ 08542,” from “Kissing on Main Street,” 2015, original SX-70 Polaroid.

The exhibition, which runs through May 8, features the work of three Wisconsin photographers, including Casid. All three exhibitions highlight photography that engages with different conceptions of intimacy, interrogates the archive as a site of emotional resonance and reveals drastic changes in photographic technologies.

“Although they are three distinct exhibitions, they complement each other wonderfully,” said Beth Zinsli, director and curator of the Wriston Art Center galleries.

Casid’s “Kissing on Main Street” will be shown in the Kohler Gallery. Using a Polaroid camera, Casid captures acts of public intimacy and points her camera at the theoretical intersection of sex, imaging technology, vulnerable exposure and policing. She explores the vulnerability and temporality of public displays of affection through a medium that is itself instantaneous and easily shareable yet susceptible to damage and overexposure. An artist, theorist and historian, Casid founded and served as the first director of the Center for Visual Cultures at UW.

The Hoffmaster Gallery hosts “The Archive as a River: Paul Vanderbilt and Photography,” a celebration of the work of Vanderbilt (1905-1992), who sought new ways to understand the world through visual images as a visionary, archivist and photographer.

From 1942-1945, Vanderbilt worked with Roy Stryker at the Library of Congress, classifying more than 200,000 photographs of tenant farmers and farm workers for the Farm Security Administration. In 1954 he was hired by the Wisconsin Historical Society to curate and organize a treasure trove of images that became known as the Iconographic Collections. Inspired by Stryker’s approach of organizing materials around themed collections, Vanderbilt created a unique visual archive that is renowned for its depth, subtlety and flexibility.

Paul-Vanderbilt_newsblog
Paul Vanderbilt and his camera (detail), ca. 1963. Photographer unknown. Wisconsin Historical Society (WHI 87567).

Vanderbilt spent 18 years as the field photographer for the WHS, focusing his lens on rural Wisconsin landscapes, architecture and small-town life. His fine sense of composition created photography with narrative and meaning that went beyond mere documentation.

He pioneered new formats for presenting images from the Iconographic Collections and his idiosyncratic thematic panels and pairings combine thoughtfully selected historic images with his own photographs and poetic texts. “The Archive as a River” includes large-scale reproductions of his thematic panels and pairings, a selection of Vanderbilt’s own photographs of Wisconsin and an array of artifacts and papers that reveal his innovative approach to organizing images.

The Vanderbilt exhibition is organized by the James Watrous Gallery, Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters and the Wisconsin Historical Society, Division of Library-Archives and is sponsored in part by the Wisconsin Arts Board with funds from the State of Wisconsin and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Lavitia_newsblog
Livija Patikne, “Untitled (flowers),” no date

The Leech Gallery presents “Certificates of Presence: The Photography of Livija Patikne.” A U.S. immigrant, the Latvian-born Patikne (1911-2001) took photos of herself throughout the 1950’s and 1960’s in different guises with intricate flower arrangements. Living in Milwaukee when she died, she left behind without explanation or instruction hundreds of these photographs that portray a quiet, private life of profound stillness, often tinged with loss. Struck by the powerful yet silent composition in these photographs, photographer James Brozek and Debra Brehmer assembled an exhibition of her work, which was first shown at Milwaukee’s Portrait Society Gallery.

Wriston Art Center hours are Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Saturday-Sunday noon – 4 p.m., closed Mondays. For more information, call 920-832-6621.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Miriam Beerman collages, print portfolio focused on social injustice featured in new Wriston Galleries exhibition

The work of prolific American artist Miriam Beerman highlights the new Wriston Art Center Galleries exhibition, which opens Friday, Sept. 18 with a reception at 6 p.m. and runs through Nov 25.

Miriam-Beerman_newsblog
Miriam Beerman’s “Untitled,” n.d., fabric, ink, oil, paper, sequins, mounted on a board. From the artist’s collection.

“Beauty and Terror, Compassion and Despair: The Collages of Miriam Beerman” is featured in the Hoffmaster and Kohler galleries. Her work explores deep emotional responses to the historical and modern tragedies of the human experience. The collage work highlights her sympathetic preoccupation with injustice and tragedy while also revealing her intellect, erudition, sense of humor and most importantly, her intuitive, spontaneous artistic process.

In conjunction with the exhibition, two screenings of the film “Miriam Beerman: Expressing the Chaos, will be shown: Oct. 7 at 5 p.m. in Lawrence’s Warch Campus Center cinema and Oct. 8 at 6 p.m. at the Appleton Public Library. A discussion with the film’s director, Jonathan Gruber, follows both screenings, which are free and open to the public. Dr. Susan and John McFadden of the Fox Valley Memory Project also will participate in the library screening discussion.

The Leech Gallery will host “Social In/Justice,” a print portfolio examining unfair acts, inequalities and restrictions to individuals or groups of people. Organized by Benjamin Rinehart, associate professor of art, the exhibition features works of 15 artists, each of whom was asked to react to and personalize challenges to societal norms through a variety of print techniques.

Rinehart and Brandon Bauer, assistant professor of art at St. Norbert College and one of the exhibition’s contributing artists, discuss organizing and creating the prints for the “Social In/Justice” portfolio at the opening reception.

The Beerman exhibition and film screenings are supported by grants from the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region, the Bemis Company Foundation and the Wisconsin Humanities Council.

Wriston Art Center hours: Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.,; Saturday-Sunday noon – 4 p.m.; closed Mondays. For more information, 920-832-6621.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence mourns the death of art professor Julie Lindemann

Associate Professor of Art Julie Lindemann, an award-winning photographer, lost a courageous battle with cancer Tuesday, August 25. She was 57.

Julie-Lindemann_newblog2
Julie Lindemann, 1957-2015

Lindemann shared a tenure track appointment at Lawrence with John Shimon, her artist collaborator of more than 30 years. Their close collaboration led to works of remarkable originality and a memorable, distinctive style.

As contemporary artists who used old-fashioned photographic techniques, Lindemann and Shimon combined intellectual and creative energy to tell incredible human stories through their powerful portraits of ordinary people, especially native Wisconsinites, revealing the complexities of human nature.

Lindemann was deeply admired for her ability to see potential in all of her subjects, the sensitivity for which she dealt with them and for her masterful use of historic photographic processes. Incredibly generous with her time and ideas, she was a popular faculty member and students loved being taught by her and working with her.

Lindemann and Shimon joined the Lawrence art department in 2000 in a joint appointment as visiting instructors. Five years later they were appointed to a shared tenure track appointment. Their courses were always team-taught, demonstrating the effectiveness of collaborative teaching. Fully embracing the power of liberal arts education, Lindemann and Shimon were recognized with Lawrence’s faculty award for Excellence in Creative Activity at the college’s 2012 commencement.

Their photography has been featured in more than 90 solo and group exhibitions in venues ranging from the Art Institute of Chicago to the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego and are part of 15 permanent collections, including the Milwaukee Art Museum and the Wisconsin State Historical Society.

Their work was showcased in the 2014 major exhibition “We Go From Where We Know” at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Sheboygan and most recently, a retrospective covering 30 years of their work — “There’s A Place: Photographs by J. Shimon & J. Lindemann” — was featured at the Museum of Wisconsin Art in West Bend.

In December 2014, Mary Louise Schumacher, the art critic of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, honored Lindemann and Shimon as Wisconsin’s Artists of the Year.

In May, Lindemann and Shimon were recognized for their creative accomplishments with a Wisconsin Visual Art Achievement Award, which honors artists who have contributed to the wealth of creativity in Wisconsin.

A native of northeast Wisconsin, Lindemann grew up on a farm in the small Manitowoc County town of Osmond. She earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin and a master’s degree in social documentary photography from Illinois State University.

She began her professional career at the Milwaukee Art Museum and later enjoyed success as a freelance photographer, racking up an impressive list of clients that included the New York Times Magazine as well as Fortune, People and Men’s Health magazines, among others.

She and Shimon coauthored five books and catalogs of their work, the most successful of which was their artistic tribute to the aluminum Christmas tree chronicled in the book “Season’s Gleamings.” The book generated national attention when it was published in 2004, resulting in stories in the New York Times and USA Today and featured segments on CBS’ “Sunday Morning” and CNN.

A memorial service celebrating Lindemann’s life will be held on a date and place to be announced.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Printmaker Warrington Colescott Featured in Wriston Galleries Summer Exhibition Serie

The satirical wit and vivid imagination of Wisconsin-based printmaker Warrington Colescott will be featured in Lawrence University’s second annual summer exhibition series at the Wriston Art Center Galleries. “The Artwork of Warrington Colescott” opens July 15 and runs through Aug. 16.

The galleries’ summer series is designed to engage the Fox Valley community in a conversation about artworks and artists of the Midwest.

Warrington_Colescott_newsblog
Warrington Colescott, “The History of Printmaking: Ben Franklin at Versailles,” 1976

With an international reputation for his innovative techniques, Colescott has applied his unique interpretative skills to historical and contemporary subject matter ranging from the Lewis and Clark expedition to the on-field dominance of the Green Bay Packers. Much of his work explores themes centered around politics, the follies and horrors of war, abuse of power and wealth and relationships between men and women.

In addition to highlights from Lawrence’s own permanent collection, the exhibition also includes Colescott’s complete “History of Printmaking” series, in which he blends historical information on the development of printmaking techniques with his own humorous interpretations of events.

A one-time political cartoonist and former professor at the University of Wisconsin, where he taught for 37 years, Colescott, now 94, makes his home in Hollandale, Wis.

The Wriston Art Center galleries are free and open to the public Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, noon – 4 p.m.; closed Mondays.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.