Tag: Wriston Art Center

Wriston Art Center exhibition honors former Lawrence art professor

A photo of former Lawrence University art professor Arthur Thrall.
Arthur Thrall taught art at Lawrence from 1964 until his retirement in 1990.

 A celebration of former Lawrence University art professor Arthur Thrall’s skills and imagination as an award-winning printmaker and painter highlights the newest exhibition in Lawrence’s Wriston Art Center galleries.

Arthur Thrall: Tribute to a Master Artist” in the Kohler Gallery opens Friday, Sept. 23 at 6 p.m. with a free public reception. The exhibition runs through Nov. 23.

During a 26-year teaching career at Lawrence — Thrall retired in 1990 but remained an active artist in retirement — he established an international reputation for works inspired by sources as diverse as calligraphy and computers, music and microchips.

Covering three broad themes — calligraphy, musical notation and lyrical lines — the exhibition features a wide array of media and print-making processes, from intaglio and relief prints to gouache and oil paintings.

A video by professional photographer Mark Heffron, “Orchestrated Lines,” that documents Thrall creating the print “Confluence” will be shown during the exhibition, while the plate for that print and some of Thrall’s printmaking tools also will be displayed.

Beth Zinsli, director and curator of the Wriston Art Center galleries, called Thrall “a legend in the Wisconsin arts community.”

A photo of former Lawrence University art professor Arthur Thrall artwork in the "Tribute to a Master Artist" exhibition.
“Etude,” acrylic on canvas, will be one of Arthur Thrall’s works in the “Tribute to a Master Artist” exhibition.

“It’s an honor and a privilege to showcase this stunning array of Arthur’s complex and multilayer works in a variety of media,” said Zinsli. “I’m confident viewers will find his work aesthetically pleasing and intellectually engaging.”

His prints and paintings appeared in more than 500 exhibitions around the world and many found homes in the permanent collections of the British Museum, London’s Victoria and Albert Museum, the Tate Gallery, the Smithsonian Institute, the Library of Congress and the Chicago Art Institute, among others.

A native of Milwaukee, Thrall was one of 21 members of the Milwaukee-Downer College faculty who came to Lawrence in 1964 as part of the consolidation with the former all-women’s college. He died at the age of 88 in March, 2015.

During his career, Thrall was recognized by the art community with more than 75 awards, including the Lifetime Award from the Society of American Graphic Artists in New York in 2013. He also received the Museum of Wisconsin Art’s Wisconsin Visual Art Lifetime Achievement Award in 2011.

A photo of Shannon Sullivan's "Interractive Bubble Array" work in the exhibition "FACET."
Shannon Sullivan’s”Interactive Bubble Array” will be among the featured works in the exhibition “FACET.”

In addition to “Tribute to a Master Artist,” the Leech and Hoffmaster galleries host  “FACET: Diverse Works by Women in the West.” The show features five female artists from the American West — Renee Brown, Natalie Macellaio, Jessica McCambly, Lesli Robertson and Shannon Sullivan — who work with “heavy” sculpture materials, including metals, clay, concrete, wood and glass. Their work, reflecting deep consideration of the virtues and limitations of their chosen medium, references the natural world, including geologic, chemical and biological processes.

“FACET” includes Sullivan’s interactive piece “Interactive Bubble Array,” which visitors can manipulate (while wearing gloves).

The Wriston Art Center galleries are free and open to the public Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday noon – 4 p.m.; closed Mondays. For more information on the exhibition, 920-832-6890.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Printmaker Warrington Colescott Featured in Wriston Galleries Summer Exhibition Serie

The satirical wit and vivid imagination of Wisconsin-based printmaker Warrington Colescott will be featured in Lawrence University’s second annual summer exhibition series at the Wriston Art Center Galleries. “The Artwork of Warrington Colescott” opens July 15 and runs through Aug. 16.

The galleries’ summer series is designed to engage the Fox Valley community in a conversation about artworks and artists of the Midwest.

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Warrington Colescott, “The History of Printmaking: Ben Franklin at Versailles,” 1976

With an international reputation for his innovative techniques, Colescott has applied his unique interpretative skills to historical and contemporary subject matter ranging from the Lewis and Clark expedition to the on-field dominance of the Green Bay Packers. Much of his work explores themes centered around politics, the follies and horrors of war, abuse of power and wealth and relationships between men and women.

In addition to highlights from Lawrence’s own permanent collection, the exhibition also includes Colescott’s complete “History of Printmaking” series, in which he blends historical information on the development of printmaking techniques with his own humorous interpretations of events.

A one-time political cartoonist and former professor at the University of Wisconsin, where he taught for 37 years, Colescott, now 94, makes his home in Hollandale, Wis.

The Wriston Art Center galleries are free and open to the public Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, noon – 4 p.m.; closed Mondays.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Arthur Thrall 1926-2015: Earned international acclaim for his painting, printmaking

Professor Emeritus of Art and former Charles S. Farrar-Laura Norcross Marrs Professor of Fine Arts Arthur Thrall died Wednesday, March 11 in Milwaukee after a battle with cancer. He was 88, a week shy of his 89th birthday.

Arthur-Thrall_newsblog
Professor Emeritus of Art Arthur Thrall received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society of American Graphic Artists in 2013. Photo by Wade Thrall.

A dedicated teacher, distinguished painter, award-winning printmaker and die-hard Chicago Cubs fan, Thrall was one of 21 members of the Milwaukee-Downer College faculty who came to Lawrence in 1964 as part of the consolidation with the former all-women’s college. He began a 34-year teaching career in 1956 at Milwaukee-Downer and spent 26 years at Lawrence before retiring in 1990. He remained an active artist in retirement, creating paintings and prints in his studio in Milwaukee’s Riverwest neighborhood.

As an educator, Thrall was respected by students and peers alike for his imagination, patience, encouraging nature and high standards. Dedicated to arts education, his artwork embodied the interdisciplinary nature of a Lawrence education. He often incorporated diverse visual ideas from music, languages, science and literature into his prints and paintings.

Whether in the art studio, the classroom or the faculty committee, Thrall was passionate about the role and importance of art to the Lawrence, as well as the greater, community. He generously contributed his expertise and experience to the creation of the Wriston Art Center.

In addition to Milwaukee-Downer and Lawrence, Thrall held teaching positions in the Kenosha School District and the State University New York-Geneseo. He also taught classes in Finland, London and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Art-Thrall_'Oval-10'_newsblog
“Oval 10,” a 1971 etching commissioned by the Wisconsin Arts Council, is one of several works Arthur Thrall donated to Lawrence’s Wriston Art Center’s permanent collection.

As an artist with an international reputation, Thrall drew inspiration from sources as diverse as calligraphy and computers, music and microchips. His artwork has appeared in more than 500 exhibitions as well as the White House and is included in the permanent collections of the British Museum, London’s Victoria and Albert Museum, the Tate Gallery, the Smithsonian Institute, the Library of Congress and the Chicago Art Institute, among others.

He was recognized by the art community with more than 75 awards, including the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society of American Graphic Artists in New York in 2013, the Museum of Wisconsin Art’s Wisconsin Visual Art Lifetime Achievement Award in 2011, the 1984 “Artist of the Year” designation by the Wisconsin Foundation for the Arts and the Louis Comfort Tiffany Fellowship in Printmaking.

A native of Milwaukee, he earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from UW-Milwaukee and did additional post-graduate study at the University of Illinois, UW-Madison and Ohio State University.

Thrall is survived by his wife Win, former art director at Lawrence, Shorewood, and four children: Grant (Shelly), Minneapolis; Wade (Terese), Chicago; Sara Cortese (Mark), Philadelphia; and Jay, Afton, Minn. He is further survived by seven grandchildren.

The family will greet friends Sunday, March 22 from 1–5 p.m. at Northshore Funeral Services, 3601 N. Oakland Ave.
, Milwaukee. A memorial service celebrating his life will be held May 9 from 1-5 p.m. at the Charles Allis Art Museum, 1801 N. Prospect Ave., Milwaukee. Memorial gifts may be directed to Lawrence University, for the Arthur A. Thrall Student Travel Fund, 711 E. Boldt Way, Appleton, WI 54911 or the Museum of Wisconsin Art in West Bend.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

New Wriston Art Center Galleries Exhibition Features “Cosmogony 2.0,” Pop-up Books and Masculine Archetypes

Carol Emmons‘ “Cosmogony 2.0,” a large-scale, site-specific and participatory installation in the Kohler Gallery, is among three new works in the latest Lawrence University Wriston Art Center galleries exhibition opening Friday, March 28. The exhibition runs through May 4.

Shawn-Sheehy_Snapdragon_newsblog
Shawn Sheehy’s “Snapdragon” from “Beyond the 6th Extinction: A Fifth Millennium Bestiary”, 2007. Handmade paper, construction, letterpress printing.

A professor of communication and the arts at UW-Green Bay, Emmons discusses her work in a free presentation Friday, April 4 at 6 p.m. in the Wriston Art Center auditorium. A reception with Emmons follows her talk.

“Cosmogony 2.0” highlights Emmons’ interest in how humans negotiate their relation to the world, particularly at the intersections of dualities, including the individual and collective, private and public, past, present and future.

The Hoffmaster Gallery features Chicago-based book artist Shawn Sheehy‘s work “2D. 3D. 4D. 5D?” A specialist in pop-up books with intricate movable parts, handmade paper and handset text, Sheehy draws upon biology, ecology and environmental studies in his art. His books include “Welcome to the NeighborWood: A Pop-Up Book of Animal Architecture,” “A Pop-Up Field Guide to North American Wildflowers” and “Counting on the Marsh.” Sheehy discusses his work in an April 10 lecture at 4:30 p.m. in the Wriston Art Center auditorium.

“Man Up! Masculine Archetypes in Visual Art” will be displayed in the Leech Gallery. The exhibition examines archetypes of masculinity as represented in the Wriston Art Gallery’s permanent collection and is presented in conjunction with the Lawrence history course “Reel Men: Masculinity in American Film, 1945-2000.

Wriston Art Center hours are Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Saturday-Sunday noon – 4 p.m. The galleries are closed on Mondays. 920-832-6621 for more information.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

New Exhibition Opens in Wriston Art Galleries Jan. 17

 Iowa City-based photographer Sandra Dyas delivers the opening lecture in the latest Wriston Art Center Galleries exhibition Friday, Jan. 17 at 6 p.m. in the Wriston Art Center auditorium. The exhibition runs through March 16. A reception follows Dyas’ remarks, which is free and open to the public.

Wriston Exhibition_Sandra Dyas_newsblog
“Caroline Louise, near Andrew, Iowa” by Sandra Dyas, from her 2013 project “Lost in the Midwest.”

The exhibition includes:

• Kohler Gallery: Dyas presents photographs and videos titled “my eyes are not shut.” Her work is informed by her interest in recording life “as she sees it” with careful attention to light and peoples’ relationships with their environments. A lecturer in art at Cornell College, Dyas’ book “Down to the River: Portraits of Iowa Musicians” was published in 2007.

• Hoffmaster Gallery: Leslie Smith III presents “Opposing Dysfunction.” Smith uses abstract forms on canvas and paper to communicate stories about conflict and power within interpersonal relationships. He is an assistant professor of painting and drawing at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

• Leech Gallery: “Out of Place: The Obsolescence of Artifacts,” a culmination of student research in Assistant Professor of Art Ben Tilghman’s seminar “The Art of Stuff: Thing Thing Theory and Art History.” Student in the seminar selected an art object from the Wriston’s permanent collection, contemplating how recent developments in philosophy, archaeology and critical theory might impact how we respond to the “thingness” of the art piece — its materiality, status as commodity, varied functions and resistance to human mastery.

The Wriston Art Center is open Tuesday-Friday from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Saturday-Sunday from noon – 4 p.m., closed   Mondays. For more information, call 920-832-6621.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

 

Panel of Lawrence Scholars Examine Constitutional Issues Faced by President Lincoln

Jerald Podair

A three-member panel of scholars will discuss constitutional issues presented by the Civil War Thursday, Jan. 10 at 4:30 p.m. in  Lawrence University’s Wriston Art Center auditorium. The program will include a question-and-answer session with the audience.

The presentation is in conjunction with the 1,000-square-foot traveling exhibit “Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War” that is on display in Lawrence’s Seeley G. Mudd Library until Feb. 8. Both the panel presentation and the exhibition are free and open to the public.

Arnold Shober

Participating in the discussion will be Lawrence faculty members Jerald Podair, professor of history and Robert S. French Professor of American Studies, and Arnold Shober, associate professor of government. Joining them will be 1981 Lawrence graduate James Cornelius, curator of the Lincoln Collection at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library & Museum in Springfield, Ill.

James Cornelius ’81

The panel will examine a variety of topics, among them:

What the words “all men are created equal” meant in the Declaration of Independence, what they meant to Jefferson Davis and his fellow Confederates and how did Lincoln interpret the word “equal?”

Was secession constitutional?

How did Lincoln and Jefferson Davis reflect clashing understandings of the nature of the “more perfect Union” established by the Constitution?

Did the Constitution form an unbreakable “contract” with the American people or a revocable “compact” between sovereign states?

How did the stresses of civil war erode civil liberties in the United States?

How did Lincoln balance national security and personal freedom during the Civil War, especially with regard to Northern critics of the war?

Was Lincoln an extraconstitutional “tyrant,” as his political enemies argued?

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2013 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.

 

 

Senior Art Exhibition Opens May 25 at Wriston Galleries

The work of 14 Lawrence University art majors will be featured in the annual Senior Art Exhibit that opens Friday, May 25 in the Wriston Art Center galleries. The exhibition, which runs through July 29, opens at 6 p.m. with a reception with the student artists.

"Wilmer," oil on canvas, Annie Raccuglia

The exhibition includes books, ceramics, drawings, paintings, photography, prints, sculpture and video. To see each artists work, please check out our LUX site on the show.

The students whose work will be featured are Suzanne Craddock, Aisha Eiger, Kaitlyn Herzog, Eli Hungerford, Kelly  Mariahazy, Katie Nelson, Sydney Pertl, Annie Raccuglia, Hillary Rogers, Alison Scattergood, Christine Lyn Seeley, Sara Sheldon-Rosson, Timeka Toussaint and Jinglei Xiao.

The Wriston Art Center galleries are free and open to the public Tuesday-Friday from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Saturday-Sunday from noon – 4 p.m. The galleries are closed on Mondays. For more information on the exhibition, call 920-832-6890 or visit www.lawrence.edu/news/wriston.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges by Forbes, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries. Follow us on Facebook.

Lawrence University Remembers the Holocaust in Multimedia Symposium

As the remaining voices of Holocaust survivors grow fewer and more far between, Lawrence University will examine that dark moment in human history May 11-13 in a wide-ranging, interdisciplinary and multimedia symposium entitled “Austrian Jews: Exile and the Holocaust.”

The symposium will bring together Lawrence students, faculty and the larger community in a far-ranging examination of both the history and present-day implications of the Holocaust.

Full schedule of events

The timing of the symposium is tied to the anniversary of the end of World War II on May 8, 1945 and to the annual April 19 “Day of Remembrance,” which each year commemorates the Jewish genocide at the hands of the Nazis. All symposium events are free and open to the public.

Survivor Stories

Highlighting the program will be the first-person experiences shared by four Holocaust survivors who fled Vienna, Austria in 1938 to escape the Nazis. Curtis Brown from Neenah, and Anne Kelemen, Gerda Lederer and Renee Wiener, all from New York City, will share their personal accounts of topics covering life in Austria leading up to the war, escape via the Kinder Transport, working with the French Underground and life during the war in the labor camps.

Brown, Kelemen and Lederer star in the 1999 award-winning documentary on the Viennese emigration, “Abschied ein Leben Lang” (A Life-Long Farewell),” one of three films that will be shown during the symposium. Wiener was recognized in 2010 for her World War II work in the French Resistance with the Insignia of the Legion of Honor in a special awards ceremony at the French Consulate General in New York City.

“The chances of our students ever speaking to a Holocaust survivor are getting slimmer very rapidly,” said Professor of Music Catherine Kautsky, who organized the symposium. “It seems more and more urgent to give these survivors a forum in which to speak out, particularly to the younger generations of students for whom World War II may seem like ancient history.”

The inspiration for the symposium grew out of a series of round-robin letters circulated by Kautsky’s 90-year old father, John Kautsky, and a group of his Viennese high school peers, all of whom were forced by the Nazis to emigrate from Vienna in 1938.

The letters chronicle the experience of leaving their homeland and establishing citizenship in new countries. The letters are now being published, generating considerable interest in the United States, Austria and Germany. They will be featured in a presentation by Jacqueline Vansant, professor of German at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, including footage of Kautsky’s father discussing the letters, followed by clips of a present-day boy at the very same school reading from the very same letters during a December 2011 ceremony at that high school.

Multiple Perspectives

The symposium is designed to amplify the survivors’ experiences from multiple perspectives, among them:

  • film screenings: “God Does Not Believe in Us Anymore,” “Watermarks,” and “Abschied ein Leben Lang” (“A Life-Long Farewell”).
  • a pair of concerts, including staged scenes from the opera “Der Kaiser von Atlantis,” by Viktor Ullmann, written at the Theresienstadt labor camp and completed shortly before Ullmann’s death in the gas chambers at Auschwitz. Prior to the Saturday, May 12 concert, Lawrence Associate Professor of Music Julie McQuinn will present the talk “Music and the Holocaust: Remembering the Inconceivable.”
  • an art exhibition featuring prints and paintings of Austrian and German Expressionists, with commentary by Elizabeth Carlson, Lawrence associate professor of art history and Frank Lewis, curator of Lawrence’s Wriston Art Gallery.
  • dramatic readings of letters, poetry and memoirs of survivors by theatre professors Timothy X. Troy of Lawrence and Susan Sweeney of UW-Madison and actress Jacque Troy of the Milwaukee Chamber Theatre.
  • a video created by Lawrence student members of Hillel, a Jewish student organization, featuring interviews with students and faculty members discussing their family connections to the Holocaust and the responsibility of sharing information about the Holocaust with future generations.
  • a discussion of dance choreography of the period by Rebecca Salzer, visiting professor of dance, with an introduction by Lawrence President Jill Beck.
  • a presentation by Jacqueline Vansant entitled “Making Connections over Space and Time: The Extraordinary Group Correspondence of Jewish-Austrian Schoolboys.”
  • a display of student art work and poetry that deals with Judaism, the history of the Holocaust and generational issues.

“The arts will be featured prominently in the symposium as mirrors of the society in which they were created,” said Kautsky. “Concerts produced by the Lawrence Conservatory of Music faculty and guest artists will feature works by Jewish composers written in or about the concentration camps and the presentation of poetry, dance and visual art should likewise serve as very visceral reminders of a period in history we can’t afford to forget.”

A reception featuring Viennese pastries and coffee will be held with symposium participants Saturday, May 12 afternoon.

Emmy Award-winning filmmaker and current Lawrence artist-in-residence Catherine Tatge is collaborating with students to produce a documentary about the symposium.

Lawrence members of Hillel are donating six native Wisconsin perennials to the Sustainable Lawrence University Garden (SLUG) as a remembrance tribute to the six million Jews who were lost in the Holocaust.

Full schedule of events

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges by Forbes, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries. Follow us on Facebook.

African Sculptures Add Artistic Interest to Lawrence Campus

A gift of 14 African sculptures — seven for Lawrence University and seven for the Appleton Art Center — from Milwaukee art gallery owner David Barnett and his wife, Susan, a 1981 Lawrence graduate, will be officially dedicated Wednesday, June 16 in private ceremonies on campus and at the ACC.

The sculptures were created by members of the Shona tribe of Zimbabwe from a variety of stones, including opal, spring and serpentine.

Several of the pieces have been donated in memory or honor of people with special ties to Lawrence, the Fox Valley community or the Barnetts.  Lawrence’s seven sculptures are located in four locations on campus.

Beggar_web
“Beggar”

“Beggar,” a piece donated in memory of James Auer, a 1950 Lawrence graduate who was a decades-long reporter and art critic for the Milwaukee Journal and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and “Mother and Children,” donated in memory of Barnett’s parents, Philip M. and Ethel Barnett, are located along the new riverwalk nature trail behind the Warch Campus Center.

“Traditional Dancer,” dedicated to the memory of Kaitlin Mahr, a member of the class of 2009 and “African Girl,” dedicated in honor of Cory ’92 and Michelle Nettles, are in the Wriston Art Center.

Proud-of-my-new-hair
“Proud of My New Hair”

“Resting Man,” dedicated to the memory of former Lawrence Professor of French Gervais Reed and “Proud of My New Hair” can be found on Hurvis Crossing over Lawe Street.

“Waving Woman,” which was carved by Colleen Madamombe, widely considered one of the top sculptors in Zimbabwe, is located in Memorial Hall.

Summer Seminar Focuses on Public Art

Taking a page from its popular Bjorklunden Summer Seminar Series offered in Door County, Lawrence University will sponsor a two-and-one-half-day seminar on public art July 19-21 on its Appleton campus.

“Public Art: Process and History” will feature three classes led by members of the Lawrence art and art history department. The classes will start at 8:30 a.m. each day in the Warch Campus Center.

Sculptor Rob Neilson, associate professor of art, opens the seminar with the class “Contemporary Public Art: Purpose, Process, Product and People.” The class will include a trip to the Appleton Art Center and a stop at a local downtown establishment for wine and conversation.

Elizabeth Carlson, assistant professor of art history, presents “Public Art in the 20th Century.” The class will include an afternoon field trip to the Paine Art Center and Gardens in Oshkosh.

Michael Orr, professor of art history, concludes the seminar with the half-day class “Public Art in Renaissance Florence.”

Participants can attend either as commuters or as residents, with housing provided in Lawrence’s Hiett Hall. A light breakfast and a lunch are provided each day. Seminar cost is $200, with an additional charge for housing if needed. The fee includes transportation and admission passes to the two art centers.

Class size is limited with a registration deadline of July 9. To register or for more information, contact Lori Vosters, 800-283-8320, ext. 7019 or lori.a.vosters@lawrence.edu.