Ruby Dickson awarded Fulbright-Hays Scholarship for Chinese language immersion program in Beijing

Ruby Dickson will venture outside the United States for the first time this summer courtesy of the U.S. Department of Education.

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Ruby Dickson ’16

The Lawrence University junior from Louisville, Colo., has been awarded a $2,700 Fulbright-Hays Scholarship for the 2015 Associated Colleges in China (ACC) Intensive Language Program. In addition to the scholarship, Dickson will receive $800 for travel expenses.

This is the 10th year in a row at least one Lawrence student has been recognized by the Fulbright Program. Dickson is the 14th Lawrence recipient of a Fulbright award in the past five years.

Beginning June 14, Dickson will participate in a Chinese language immersion program at Beijing’s Minzu University. The program runs through Dec. 7.

“I’m really excited for the chance to go to Beijing, especially since this is my first time leaving the United States,” said Dickson, who is pursuing a double major in Chinese language & literature and economics. “The Fulbright-Hays will help me with funding this amazing opportunity and I’m incredibly grateful for the generosity of those responsible for the scholarship.

“While I’m in China, I’ll have the opportunity not only to learn the Chinese language, but also to understand Chinese culture, conduct research and make valuable friends and connections,” Dickson added. “The Fulbright-Hays represents an amazing opportunity to build on my experiences at Lawrence. I can’t wait to begin my trip.”

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Minzu University, Beijing, China

Kuo-ming Sung, associate professor of Chinese and linguistics and one of Dickson’s academic advisors, said she is one of the brightest and hardest working students he has had in his classes.

“What is truly remarkable about Ruby is her creativity and imagination,” said Sung. “She transforms otherwise ordinary sentence patterns and vocabulary into fun-filled dialogues and compositions. Her oral presentations are always enthusiastic and infused with a wonderful sense of humor.”

Following her language program, Dickson will remain in China for several more weeks to complete an internship in the finance department of Deprag Industries, a Germany-based industrial manufacturing company with an office in Beijing.

David Gerard, associate professor of economics, said Dickson came to her economics major late, but has quickly distinguished herself.

“Ruby’s academic excellence is no accident. I call on people randomly and she has consistently demonstrated she had prepared for class and typically has a handle on even the more difficult material. She has very good foresight, is an exceptional planner and certainly does not shy away from academic challenges. Many students will take courses to protect their GPA, but Ruby shows no indication of taking that route. The internship abroad presents a great opportunity for her to operationalize her economics training and her liberal arts education more generally.”

Administered by the U.S. Department of Education, the Fulbright-Hays Group Program Abroad seeks to strengthen foreign language expertise through advanced overseas study and research opportunities and by providing experiences and resources that enabling educators to strengthen their international teaching.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Wriston Galleries’ newest exhibition features Lawrence senior art majors

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Judy Garland, 1922-1969, 2015, oil on board, by Lauren Stinski

Eight Lawrence University art majors will have their creative work featured in the annual Senior Major Exhibition opening Friday, May 22 in the Wriston Art Center galleries. The exhibition, which is free and open to the public, runs through July 5.

The exhibition, includes artist books, ceramics, painting, photography, sculpture and video, opens at 6 p.m. with a reception with the student artists.

The seniors whose work will be featured are:
Zain Ali, Ellicott City, Md.
Rachel Jo Arnow, Fox Point
Lucy Bouman, Maywood, Ill.
Theresa Iacullo, Chicago, Ill.
Htee T. Moo, St. Paul, Minn.
Lauren Stinski, Appleton
Rachel Wilke, Milwaukee
Caitlin Wittner, Lakewood, Colo.

The Wriston Art Center galleries are free and open to the public Tuesday-Friday from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Saturday-Sunday from noon – 4 p.m. The galleries are closed on Mondays. For more information on the exhibition, call 920-832-6890.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

18th annual Harrison Symposium highlights Lawrence student research

Twenty-six presentations on topics ranging from a cross cultural comparison of eating attitudes and behaviors to the feminist movements in contemporary Sweden and China will be delivered Saturday, May 16 during Lawrence University’s 18th annual Richard A. Harrison Symposium.Harrison Symposium 2015_newsblog_edited-1

The symposium, which showcases exceptional student research in the humanities and social sciences, begins at 9:15 a.m. in various locations in Main Hall.A complete schedule of presentations, times and locations can be found here.

The symposium features 20-minute presentations arranged into panels by topic or field. Each is moderated by a Lawrence faculty member and includes a 10-minuyte question-and-answer session following the presentations. Symposium participants present their work in the format used for professional meetings of humanities and social sciences scholars.

First conducted in 1996, the symposium honors former Lawrence Dean of the Faculty Richard Harrison, who died unexpectedly the following year. The symposium was renamed in his honor to recognize his vision of highlighting excellent student scholarship.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Theatre Arts Department Presents Lanford Wilson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning “The Rimers of Eldritch”

The question of truth versus appearance is explored in the Lawrence University theatre arts production of Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Lanford Wilson’s “The Rimers of Eldritch.”

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Courtroom testimony during a murder trial pits residents of Eldritch against each other. (Photo by Nathan B. Lawrence)

Four performances in Stansbury Theatre are scheduled May 14-16 with an 8 p.m. show each night and an additional 3 p.m. matinee on Saturday, May 16. Tickets, at $15 for adults, $8 for students/seniors, are available through the Lawrence Box Office, 920-832-6749.

An off-Broadway hit that won the Drama Desk Vernon Rice Award, this poetic, haunting 1966 drama chronicles a month in fictional Eldritch, Mo., a one-time prosperous mining town gone to seed by the mid-20th century, when the play is set.

When the town hermit, Skelly Mannor (played by sophomore Jacob Dalton), is murdered by Nelly Windrod (played by freshman Jenny Hanrahan) in uncertain circumstances, the townspeople must ask themselves how such a crime could be committed in their midst. The subsequent trial, presided over by the Judge/Preacher (played by sophomore Kip Hathaway), peels back the layers of Eldritch to reveal an intolerance and religious hypocrisy the townspeople never wanted to see.

Director Kathy Privatt said the play was chosen for production in part because of the unusual way Wilson tells the story.

“The events of the story are offered in a collage format, not linearly,” said Privatt, associate professor of theatre arts and James G. and Ethel M. Barberr Professor of Theatre and Drama. “This technique offers interesting juxtapositions of scenes happening back-to-back or on top of each other, even though they aren’t that way in time.”

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Kip Hathaway as the Preacher delivers a sermon that puts responsibility for a murder on the entire town of Eldritch. (Photo by Nathan B. Lawrence)

In a review, the New York Times praised the way Wilson “used the art of counterpoint to illuminate the people of Eldritch, a town that is itself an entrapment.”

What the Village Voice once called the “exactness and inner logic” of Wilson’s dialogue are also on display in the play, which is as humane as it is incisive.

Privatt cites an interview Wilson gave when the play was first staged as evidence of this fact.

“At one point, the interviewer asked why Wilson wrote about such losers. Wilson got a shocked look on his face and admitted that he’d never thought of them as losers, but as survivors doing whatever they had to, to survive. He admitted that they might be ‘in deep yogurt,’ but fundamentally, they were just humans who wanted to survive,” said Privatt.

The play’s mix of criticism and compassion is reflected by its title. “Rime” refers to hoar frost, a coating of white crystals that is both beautiful and harsh.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Climate change focus of Lawrence’s annual Honors Convocation

David Gerard, associate professor of economics at Lawrence University, discusses the considerable consensus about climate policy that economists have reached in the college’s annual Honors Convocation.

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2015 Faculty Convocation Award recipient David Gerard

Gerard presents “Is it Warm in Here? The Intractable Challenges of Climate Change” Thursday, May 14 at 11:10 a.m in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel in the 2014-15 convocation series finale. The event is free and open to the public. It also will be live streamed.

Following the address, Gerard also will conduct a question-and-answer session from 1-2 p.m. in the Warch Campus Center cinema.

The Honors Convocation publicly recognizes students and faculty recipients of awards and prizes for excellence in the arts, humanities, sciences, social sciences, languages and music as well as demonstrated excellence in athletics and service to others.

Gerard was chosen as speaker as the recipient of Lawrence’s annual Faculty Convocation Award, which honors a faculty member for distinguished professional work. He is the sixth faculty member so honored.

A specialist in risk analysis, Gerard will outline projected impacts of fossil fuel emissions on global temperatures and discuss the economic and political challenges associated with mitigating carbon emissions, drawing upon his research in electricity generation costs and “clean coal” technologies.

His research focuses on rules and regulations that govern everything from health and safety to the environment, including remediation of hazardous waste sites, automobile fuel economy and emissions and the effect of changing from standard time to daylight savings time on traffic fatalities.

He shared his expertise with the Senate subcommittee on Environment and Public Works on Clean Water Act reform in 2000 and spent two years as a member of a special National Academy of Sciences panel investigating the safety challenges of advanced automotive electronics, sparked by the rash of unexplained accelerator accidents in Toyota vehicles.

Gerard was instrumental in the development of two interactive websites that allow users to explore various dimensions of mortality risks. TrafficSTATS allows users to explore traffic risks for various vehicle types and demographic characteristics while Death Risk Rankings enables users to compare the probability of dying by various causes in the United States and the European Union.

Prior to joining the Lawrence faculty in 2009, Gerard spent eight years at Carnegie Mellon University as the executive director of the Center for the Study and Improvement of Regulation in the department of Engineering and Public Policy.

Gerard earned a bachelor’s degree in American studies and economics from Grinnell College and earned a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Illinois.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Kronos Quartet brings their acclaimed artistic vision to Lawrence Memorial Chapel

The internationally renowned Kronos Quartet closes the 2014-15 Lawrence University Artist Series with a performance Friday, May 15 at 8 p.m. in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel.

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Kronos Quartet — violinist John Sherba, cellist Sunny Yang, violist Hank Dutt and violinist David Harrington — close the 2014-15 Lawrence Artist Series Friday May 15.

Tickets, at $25/30 for adults, $20/25 for seniors and $18/20 for students, are available through the Lawrence Box Office, 920-832-6749.

Since their founding in 1973, the Kronos Quartet – violinists David Harrington and John Sherba, violist Hank Dutt and cellist Sunny Yang — has become one of the most celebrated ensembles in classical music. Known for their dedication to fostering relationships with both young and established composers, the quartet has commissioned more than 800 pieces of music during its 41-year history – nearly one every two weeks.

“Certainly, many fine ensembles have worked to commission new works, collaborate with composers, artists and literary figures, reach new audiences and make connections with ethnic and folk traditions. However, no ensemble of any kind has consistently done all of these things with the pioneering spirit and artistic vision of the Kronos Quartet,” said Associate Professor of Music Matthew Michelic, who knew and performed with Sherba when they were both undergraduates at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

“One can easily argue that on the international scene, the Kronos Quartet has been the most influential chamber music ensemble of the last 40 years,” Michelic added.

Harrington was inspired to form the group after hearing a radio broadcast of “Black Angels,” an urgent, unorthodox musical response to the Vietnam War by the American composer George Crumb. Since then, the group has commissioned and premiered works by many of the most important contemporary composers, including John Adams, Steve Reich and Phillip Glass.

“One can easily argue that on the international scene, the Kronos Quartet has been the most influential chamber music ensemble of the last 40 years.”
— Matthew Michelic

Composer Terry Riley, one of the fathers of minimalism, has been an especially frequent collaborator, having written 27 pieces for the quartet. Riley cites his relationship with Kronos as a major influence on his work.

“By sitting down and actually writing the music I’d been improvising, I started to see new possibilities in the music itself, especially viewed through the lens of a string quartet,” Riley said.

Kronos’ concert program will include selections from one of the pieces Riley wrote for the group, “Salome Dances for Peace.”

Dedicated to fostering young composers, Kronos’ “Under 30 Project” commissions work every year from composers who have yet to turn 30 years old. The 2015-16 season will be the first year of their new “50 for the Future” initiative, which will commission 50 works – 10 per year for the next five years — devoted to contemporary approaches to the quartet and designed expressly for the training of students and emerging professionals.

Kronos’ singular focus on new music has led the New York Times to credit the group with “reinventing the string quartet as a vehicle of limitless stylistic breadth.”

In addition to touring extensively, the quartet has released more than 50 recordings. Their extensive list of honors and awards includes the 2011 Polar Music Prize, the 2011 Avery Fisher Prize, a 2004 Grammy for Best Chamber Music Performance and Musical America’s 2003 “Musicians of the Year” designation.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Funding Help: Lawrence joins Foundation Center’s National Network to provide resources for area grantseekers

Lawrence University has become a Funding Information Network partner with the Foundation Center of New York and that’s good news for northeast Wisconsin nonprofit organizations and other agencies seeking funding sources.

FINpartnersquaread_newsblogThrough a collaboration with the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region, United Way Fox Cities and Oshkosh Area United Way, Lawrence will serve as host to a Funding Information Network location, providing free public access to a valuable collection of funding resources for a wide range of area grantseekers in the college’s Seeley G. Mudd Library.

“This is the type of funding information resource that small nonprofits can really benefit from, but can rarely afford,” said Jenna Stone, who leads Lawrence’s grants office as the executive director of corporate, foundation and sponsored research support. “The searchable databases of grants and funders put incredibly detailed information at the fingertips of nonprofit staff, volunteers, schools, teachers and other grantseekers.”

As one of only seven Funding Information Network partners in Wisconsin, Lawrence will provide under-resourced and underserved populations that need vital information and training with tools to become successful grantseekers.

Located nationally and internationally, Funding Information Network partners offer free access to the Foundation Center’s extensive information on grantmakers as well guidance on how to apply for grants. The Center’s core collection of resources includes “Foundation Directory Online,” which profiles more than 110,000 U.S. grantmakers, “Foundation Grants to Individuals Online,” “Philanthropy In/Sight,” print directories and proposal writing guides.

“This is the type of funding information resource that small nonprofits can really benefit from, but can rarely afford.”
       — Jenna Stone

These databases and electronic and print resources are available to the general public any time Lawrence’s Seeley G. Mudd Library is open.

“The Community Foundation is committed to strengthening nonprofits in our area, so we are happy to be a part of a partnership that gives them access to such a valuable resource,” said Curt Detjen, Community Foundation president and CEO.

To launch the Funding Information Network site, Lawrence will hold an informal open house and a series of three free training sessions to assist area grantseekers on how to effectively use the Foundation Center resources and identify potential funders.

A community open house at Lawrence’s Mudd Library will be held Monday, May 11 from 4-7 p.m. It will include tours of the library, information on library resources available to the public and an introduction to the Funding Information Network resources.

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Lawrence’s Seeley G. Mudd will be home to an extensive amount of free resource information on grantmakers as well guidance on how to apply for grants. The library also will host a series of training workshops for grantseekers in May (19, 28) and June (6).

On Tuesday, May 19 from 6:30-8 p.m., Lawrence will conduct the first of three “Introduction to Finding Grants” workshops in the Mudd Library. These hands-on workshops, led by members of Lawrence’s own grant-writing staff, will provide an overview of the grants landscape, basic strategies for identifying potential funding sources as well as a demonstration of “Foundation Directory Online.”

The workshop will be repeated Thursday, May 28 from 6:30-8 p.m. and again Saturday, June 6 from 10-11:30 a.m. Space is limited at each session and an RSVP is required to reserve a spot.

Additional information about the Funding Information Network at Lawrence, library hours, directions, upcoming events and RSVP instructions is available here.

Established in 1956, the Foundation Center is the nation’s leading authority on organized philanthropy, serving grantseekers, grantmakers, researchers, policymakers, the media and the general public. Thousands of people visit the Center’s web site each day and are served in its five regional learning centers and its international partnerships with hundreds of Funding Information Network locations.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Senior Amanda Jaskolski named Midwest Conference Softball Player of the Year

Lawrence University softball star Amanda Jaskolski has been named the Midwest Conference Player of the Year for the second consecutive season.

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Lawrence senior shortstop Amanda Jaskolski was named the Midwest Conference Softball Player of the Year for the second consecutive season.

Jaskolski (Shawano, Wis./Shawano), a senior shortstop, earned the honor after leading the conference in several offensive categories and helping Lawrence to the North Division title.

Sophomore catcher Sam Belletini (Gurnee, Ill./Warren Township) also was named to the first team, and senior pitcher Liz Barthels (Sheboygan Falls, Wis./Sheboygan Falls) was chosen for the second team.

Jaskolski, who was the North Division Player of the Year in 2014, hit .462 on the season with 37 runs scored, 13 home runs and 46 runs batted in. She led the league in on-base percentage at .573 and was first in RBIs, homers and walks (31) and finished second in hits, slugging percentage and runs scored.

Jaskolski decimated the Lawrence season records in 2015 by tying or setting six marks.

Her 13 homers eclipsed the record of 12 set by Carli Gurholt in 2009 and her 46 RBIs topped Gurholt’s 2009 mark of 45. Jaskolski obliterated the total bases record with 104. The mark was 79, set by Jenny Burris in 2001 and Gurholt in 2009.

Jaskolski’s 54 hits broke the record of 51 set by Burris in 2001, and she tied Burris’ record of 37 runs scored in 2001. Jaskolski also smashed the season walks record as teams consistently pitched around her. Jaskolski drew 31 walks, topping the mark of 22 set by Stephanie Ash in 1992.

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Senior Amanda Jaskolski battered the Lawrence record book this spring, tying or breaking six season marks.

In conference play, Jaskolski hit .439 with three doubles, three homers and 12 RBIs. Jaskolski also was walked 15 times, which helped her score a team-best 16 runs in league play.

Belletini had a tremendous season behind the plate for the Vikings and was named to the all-conference team for the first time. Batting in the clean-up spot, she hit .367 with 13 doubles, four homers and 24 RBIs. Belletini, who was named the conference Player of the Week twice in 2015, tied the season doubles record set by Alex Goodson in 2009. Belletini also was very good defensively and threw out eight of 18 runners attempting to steal.

In Lawrence’s 14 conference games, Belletini hit .551 with seven doubles, four homers and 13 RBIs. He had a .600 on-base percentage and a staggering .939 slugging percentage.

Barthels also was honored on the all-conference team for the first time. She went 13-6 with a 1.97 earned run average, the ninth-best season ERA in school history. In a team-high 117 innings pitched, Barthels struck out 44 and walked just 10, an average of 0.6 per seven innings.

Named the conference Pitcher of the Week once during 2015, Barthels tossed a pair of shutouts and picked up two saves. Barthels tossed a three-hit shutout in a 7-0 win over Knox College and allowed just five hits in an 8-0 shutout of Ripon College.

In conference action, Barthels posted a 5-2 record with a 2.13 ERA. In 42.2 innings, she struck out 20 and walked just four.

Lawrence won the North Division title for the first time since 2005 and finished second in the Midwest Conference Tournament. The Vikings finished with a 28-12 record to post the most wins by the team since setting the school record with 31 victories back in 1999.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence Honoring Deerfield, Milwaukee Teachers as ‟Outstanding Educators”

Ryan Petersen, music teacher at Deerfield High School, returns to his alma mater as one of two recipients of Lawrence University’s 2015 Outstanding Teaching in Wisconsin Award.

Tim Grandy, an English teacher at Milwaukee’s Divine Savior Holy Angels High School, also will be honored as an outstanding educator.

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Ryan Petersen ’98

Petersen and Grandy each will receive a certificate, a citation and a monetary award Sunday, May 3 from Lawrence President Mark Burstein in ceremonies at the president’s house. Their respective schools also will receive $250 from Lawrence for library acquisitions.

Recipients are nominated by Lawrence seniors and selected on their abilities to communicate effectively, create a sense of excitement in the classroom, motivate their students to pursue academic excellence while showing a genuine concern for them in and outside the classroom.

Since launching the award program in 1985, Lawrence has recognized 64 teachers.

Petersen, a 1998 Lawrence double degree graduate (B.A. and B.S.) with majors in music education and anthropology, joined the Deerfield School District that same year as band director for grades 6-12. He directs the high school jazz, pep and marching bands, the concert and jazz bands in middle school as well as 6th grade band.

In addition to music theory and music technology courses, he teaches junior- and senior-level high school classes in anthropology and archaeology. For the past 15 years, Petersen has taken his archaeology class on field trips to Bjorklunden, Lawrence’s northern campus in Door County, for site excavation exercises.

Petersen also teaches music appreciation and archaeology classes online through the Jefferson Eastern Dane Interactive (JEDI) Distance Learning/Charter School/Online School program.

Lawrence senior Savannah Vogel, who nominated Petersen for the award, was a student of his from 6th grade through graduation.

“He always had high expectations of me which allowed me to set high goals for myself as a musician and as a student,” said Vogel. “His passion for his students is apparent in the amount of time he spends working toward their success.”

Vogel said Petersen’s degree in anthropology from Lawrence helped him introduce the discipline at her school.

“Most students at Deerfield High School had never heard of anthropology and probably wouldn’t have before college if it wasn’t for Mr. Petersen,” said Vogel. “He drew a large variety of students into these classes which resulted in anthro becoming a very popular class, despite the fact that it was one of the hardest classes offered at our school.”

“His passion for his students is apparent in the amount of time he spends working toward their success.”
— Savannah Vogel ’15

He was recognized with the Wisconsin Music Educator’s Association Outstanding Young Music Educator Award in 2004. He is also a five-time winner (2002, 2004, 2008, 2009, 2015) of Deerfield High School’s Significant Educator Award, an honor chosen by the valedictorian and salutatorian of the senior class.

A native of Silver Spring, Md., Petersen is a member of the Madison Wind Ensemble and McFarland Community Band, which he also co-directs. He has served as co-president of the Deerfield Education Association since 2007.

After graduating from Lawrence, Petersen earned a master’s degree in music education from Boston University.

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Tim Grandy

Grandy joined the English department at DSHA in 1980. He teaches junior-and senior-level classes on major British writers, modern American women writers, major themes in literature, Shakespeare, a college composition course and advanced placement English literature.

Lawrence senior Marie Jeruc credited Grandy with inspiring her to pursue a major in English in college.

“I have never had a teacher who is so genuinely excited about the course materials,” Jeruc said of Grandy in her nomination. “He is engaging and exciting, but always genuinely passionate about English literature and extremely intelligent about the subject. Despite his reputation as a demanding teacher, he is also a wonderful man, full of enthusiasm, encouragement for his students and has the energy of three men combined.

“Mr. Grandy’s intensity definitely applied to his expectations for his students,” Jeruc added. “Most high school students dread writing analytical essays on literature, but writing for Mr. Grandy comes with even greater challenges. For as strict of a teacher he is, he does everything in his power to make sure his students learn as much as possible about literature and writing. He demands insightful commentary and eloquent writing, but also encourages creative thoughts and unique analyses.

“Despite his reputation as a demanding teacher, he is also a wonderful man, full of enthusiasm,
encouragement for his students and has the energy of three men combined.”

— Marie Jeruc

Born and raised in Milwaukee, Grandy also has served as DSHA’s yearbook advisor for much of his career. He was the recipient of a $1,000 Kohl Foundation Fellowship in 2005 and was recognized by the University of Chicago with its Outstanding Teacher Award — also through a nomination by a former student — in 2002.

He earned a bachelor’s degree in English education from UW-Milwaukee and a master’s degree in English and American literature from Marquette University.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Mozart Music: LU Students get rare opportunity to study composer’s hand-written score

Thanks to the thoughtfulness of a Lawrence University alumnus, music history and music composition students recently had the rare privilege of viewing an autograph leaf — a hand-written page — of a Wolfgang Mozart score.

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A 1773 two-sided autograph leaf from the fourth movement of Mozart’s “Serenata,” K. 185 offered students a rare glimpse into the hallmarks of his writing style.

Over the course of four days, more than 60 students visited the Seeley G. Mudd Library to see the autograph and hear presentations by Assistant Professor Jill Thomas, director of technical services and Associate Professor Antoinette Powell, music librarian.

Loaned to the college by a 2010 Lawrence graduate who wished to remain anonymous, the autograph provided intriguing insights both into the historical context of the piece and Mozart’s composing style.

The single, two-sided autograph leaf is from the fourth movement of Mozart’s “Serenata,” K. 185 and includes the final 10 measures of the Menuetto on one side and the first 16 measures of the Trio on the other. It was written in Austria in 1773, when Mozart was just 17, to mark the college graduation of a family friend.

“With the Mozart autograph we were able to briefly become a contemporary of Mozart,” said Assistant Professor of Music Asha Srinivasan, who took students from her Techniques of the Contemporary Composer class to one of the presentations. “We are all composers, so we put ourselves in that time period and thought about how and where Mozart composed that work. It was enlightening and awe-inspiring.”

According to Powell, at the time the piece was written, “Americans were wearing hats made out of raccoons and dumping tea into Boston Harbor, while in Salzburg, people were wearing elegant clothes and listening to Mozart in a refined setting.”

Comparing the autograph to a published edition, students were able to see that the hallmarks of Mozart’s writing style – working quickly, composing pieces in his head before committing them to paper – were already present, even at such a young age.

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Music librarian Antoinette Powell conducted a series of presentations for students on a hand-written 1773 score by Mozart that was on loan to Lawrence.

“It was so exciting to see Mozart’s original serenade and minuet,” said Annie Mercado, a freshman from Des Plaines, Ill., who participated in a presentation as part of Instructor Ann Boeckman’s music theory class. “It’s not every day that even conservatory students get to be in the presence of musical history that changed the way we look at music today.”

Cosette Bardawil, a freshman from Brookline, Mass., also a member of Boeckman’s class, found the informative background presentation  helped bring the centuries-old autograph to life.

“I especially enjoyed the forensics section about the different types of paper, the way that each paper was made and how that helped to identify the era of Mozart’s compositions,” said Bardawil.

Since students in Lawrence’s composition department are required to write music by hand, Srinivasan said the autograph presented “a wonderful opportunity to trace the practice of composition by seeing a renowned composer’s actual handwriting from that era.

“Seeing the quality and nature of the strokes of musical notation brought to life the human hand and mind behind this work in a way that published printed music simply cannot do,” said Srinivasan. “Many of my students really appreciated seeing the back of the autograph, the more ‘messy’ side that the librarians revealed by taking it out of the original casing. As composers, a lot of our work might be initially messy, too, so that was just very visceral for us all.”

The autograph’s owner first approached Brian Pertl, dean of the conservatory of music, about displaying it in the conservatory, but security concerns nixed that idea. As an alternative, it was decided library staff would invite classes at appointed times for presentations in the Mudd’s Milwaukee-Downer Room so students could compare the autograph to a modern published score.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.