Lawrence University News

Lawrence Fund Enjoys Record-Breaking Year

Posted on: July 16th, 2014 by Rick Peterson

Lawrence University alumni and friends rewarded first-year President Mark Burstein with a special present — a record-setting fundraising total.

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The Lawrence Fund provides essential support for virtually all aspects of a student’s education, including scientific equipment such as this re-circulating flume for the geology department.

But the real beneficiaries are Lawrence’s students.

For the recently completed 2013-14 fiscal year, the college raised an institutional record $3.7 million for the Lawrence Fund, breaking the previous mark of $3,647,259 set in 2008-09.

The Lawrence Fund, the college’s annual giving program, provides close to 10 percent of the annual operating budget and helps bridge the gap between what students pay in tuition and actual operating costs. The Lawrence Fund and endowment earnings help reduce each student’s tuition by more than $10,000 per year, provide much-needed support for everything from scholarships and classroom resources to athletic equipment and sheet music for conservatory students.

Lawrence’s overall fundraising for the 2013-14 fiscal year totaled $17,681,384, the sixth-most in school history.

“This past fiscal year’s record-setting Lawrence Fund total is testament to our alumni’s loyal support of the college’s mission. I’m humbled by the generosity of the 10,308 individual donors who gave to Lawrence last year,” said Burstein, who marked the end of his inaugural year as president June 30. Earlier this year, Forbes ranked Lawrence highest of any college or university in Wisconsin on its 2014 Grateful Grads Index.

Helping the Lawrence Fund establish an institutional all-time high was a record-setting gift of $804,817 by members of the Class of 1964, the most ever by a 50th reunion class.

Lawrence also added 90 new members in the past fiscal year to its Legacy Circle, the college’s planned giving program. It was the most new members in a single year since 2000 and raised the program’s total to a record 907 members.

“Making Lawrence more affordable is among our highest priorities,” said Burstein. “Support for the Lawrence Fund assures students and families from all incomes that a Lawrence education remains accessible at a time when they have less resources to support their children in college. No other form of giving has a more direct and meaningful impact on our students.”

For the second year in a row, the Lawrence Fund enjoyed 100 percent participation from all 30 members of the Lawrence Board of Trustees as well as all 35 members of the Lawrence University Alumni Association Board of Directors. Collectively, they contributed a total of $587,986 — nearly 16 percent — to the fund’s overall total.

Among Lawrence’s 20,500 alumni, nearly 36 percent contributed to Lawrence’s overall fundraising efforts in the past fiscal year. According to the New York City-based Council for Aid to Education’s most recent Voluntary Support of Education Report, private baccalaureate institutions averaged 20.1 percent alumni participation in 2012-13 (the most recent year for which figures are available.)

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Lawrence Welcomes Student Visits July 14-19 for Wisconsin Private College Week

Posted on: July 11th, 2014 by Rick Peterson

Lawrence University will waive its $40 application fee for any students visiting the campus the week of July 14-19 as it joins 22 other Wisconsin private, nonprofit colleges and universities participating in Wisconsin Private College Week.

Tours of the Lawrence campus for prospective students and their families will be offered during Wisconsin Private College Week.

Tours of the Lawrence campus for prospective students and their families will be offered during Wisconsin Private College Week.

During Wisconsin Private College Week, students are encouraged to take advantage of campus tours, meet with admission counselors and get answers to financial aid and scholarship information questions.

“When it comes to getting a feel for a college, nothing beats a campus tour,” says Ken Anselment, dean of admissions & financial aid. “You can see — and hear and feel — for yourself whether a college fits well with your sense of what you are looking for.”

Students also can register to win one of five $1,000 “Go Grants” during Wisconsin Private College Week. The grant would be applied toward tuition at Lawrence or one of the other 22 private, nonprofit colleges or universities in the state.

To schedule a visit, contact the Lawrence Admissions Office or call 920-832-6500.

Now in its 19th year, Wisconsin Private Colleges Week is sponsored by the Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence Featured in 2015 Edition of Fiske Guide to Colleges

Posted on: July 8th, 2014 by Rick Peterson

Calling it “an unpretentious school that can appeal to both the left and right side of students’ brains,” former New York Times education editor Edward Fiske included Lawrence University in his 31th edition of the nation’s “best and most interesting” colleges.

Fiske-Guide-Cover_newsblogThe Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 is a selective and systematic look at more than 300 colleges and universities in the United States, Canada and Great Britain. Described by USA Today as “the best college guide you can buy,” Fiske produces his guide annually as a resource for college-bound students and their families on which to base their educational choices.

Institutions selected for inclusion are profiled on a broad range of subjects, including student body, academics, social life, financial aid, campus setting, housing, food and extracurricular activities.

In the book’s profile of Lawrence, Fiske calls the college’s academic climate “intimate and intense.” Among his accolades he cites good relations between Lawrence and the city of Appleton, hails the student body’s wide-spread involvement with volunteerism and credits the college for its “eclectic approach to learning that attracts interested and interesting students from around the world.”

Fiske, who spent 17 years as education editor of the New York Times, also highlights the expertise of Lawrence’s faculty, the breadth of its off-campus study opportunities and Lawrence’s “pristine campus.”

In addition to individual institutional profiles, the Fiske Guide also features:

Overlap school suggestions based on which colleges share the most common applications

A list of schools where ACT and SAT scores are optional

A preprofessional guide that outlines the best schools based on majors or course of study

A sizing-yourself-up questionnaire designed to help students determine what kind of school is best for them

Fiske launched his guide as a tool to broaden students’ horizons about American higher education and help them select a college that best coincides with their particular needs, goals, interests, talents and personalities.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

 

 

 

 

Student Pianist Casey Kadlubowski Wins $1,000 Music Scholarship, Performs July 8

Posted on: July 5th, 2014 by Rick Peterson

Hours of hard work and practice time for Lawrence University senior Casey Kadlubowski have been rewarded with a $1,000 scholarship and a public recital.

Piano performance major Casey Kadlubowski performs a free recital July 8 in Menomonie, Mich.

Piano performance major Casey Kadlubowski performs a free recital July 8 in Menominee, Mich.

Kadlubowski, a piano performance major from Marinette, performs Tuesday, July 8 at the Spies Public Library in Menominee, Mich., as the winner of the 2014 Menominee Area Arts Council (MAAC) John B. Henes Scholarship Award.

Her 40-minute free recital begins at 4:30 p.m. and will include works by Bartok, Beethoven, DeBussy and Faure.

She is a student in the piano studio of Assistant Professor Michael Mizrahi.

The $1,000 scholarship competition is open to incoming and current college students from the Marinette and Menominee area specializing in either visual or performing arts. Selection is based on letters of recommendation from both a current professor and member of the hometown community as well as a CD or DVD music portfolio of the student’s work.

Founded in 1957, the MAAC seeks to promote, educate, present and encourage support of arts in the local communities. In 2013, they established the John B. Henes Scholarship award, named after one its founders, in order to continue their mission and encourage growth of local young artists.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Six Tenure-Track Appointments Joining the Lawrence Faculty This Fall

Posted on: July 1st, 2014 by Rick Peterson

With research interests ranging from poetry on the interconnection of war and religion to evaluating risk in rural-to-urban migration in Indonesia, six new tenure-track faculty members will join Lawrence University for the start of the 2014-2015 academic years year.

The departments of English, economics, anthropology, mathematics and theatre arts welcome new assistant professors as colleagues, some of whom are already familiar faces at Lawrence.

The new faculty appointments include: Hillary Caruthers and Jonathan Lhost (economics); Adam Loy (statistics); Lavanya Proctor (anthropology); Keith Pitts (theatre arts); and Melissa Range (English). They join Amy Abugo Ongiri and Copeland Woodruff, who were named to the endowed faculty positions of Jill Beck Professor/Director of Film Studies and Director of Opera Studies, respectively, earlier this year.

“We are extremely pleased with all of the persons who have been appointed to tenure-track positions at Lawrence,” said David Burrows, provost and dean of the faculty. “Each one is energetic, talented and devoted to the ideals of liberal education. They will continue Lawrence’s tradition of building the excellence of the university on a foundation of highly qualified faculty who excel at student-centered education.”

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Hillary Caruthers, assistant professor of economics

• Hillary Caruthers, economics

Caruthers spent the  2013-14 academic year as a visiting assistant professor of economics at the Campbell School of Business at Berry College in Georgia. She also spent two years as a staff leader at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Business Learning Center and held a visiting instructor appointment at Vietnam’s Hanoi University of Agriculture in 2011. A specialist in developmental economics, her research interests include labor migration, risk, applied microeconomics and East and Southeast Asian studies, especially the role of risk in rural-to-urban migration in Indonesia. She earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from Brigham Young University and a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in agricultural and applied economics from UW-Madison.

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Jonathan Lhost, assistant professor of economics

• Jonathan Lhost, economics

Lhost earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from Amherst College and a master’s and doctoral degree in economics from the University of Texas-Austin. As an assistant instructor of economics at UT-Austin, Lhost was awarded the university’s Graduate Teaching Scholars Scholarship and Seminar Certificate. His research interests include industrial organization, game theory and microeconomics. He has delivered presentations on the effectiveness of clicker technology in introductory economics and has written papers on topics ranging from the effects of merchants placing surcharges on transactions to the effects of spectrum acquisition on wireless carriers.

Adam Loy, assistant professor of mathematics

Adam Loy, assistant professor of mathematics

• Adam Loy, mathematics

Loy spent the 2013-14 academic year as a visiting assistant professor of statistics at Lawrence. His scholarship interests focus on mixed and hierarchical linear models as well as utilizing statistical methods to solve engineering and physical science problems. He has led multiple workshops on the R programming language and has delivered more than a dozen presentations on topics ranging from visually monitoring data streams to on-time flight performance in the United States. Loy earned a bachelor’s degree in mathematics/statistics at Luther College and earned both a master’s degree and Ph.D. in statistics from Iowa State University, where he served as a consultant for Statistics in the Community (StatCom), which provides pro bono statistical advice and expertise to area nonprofit organizations.

• Keith Pitts, theatre arts

Keith Pitts, assistant professor of theatre arts

Keith Pitts, assistant professor of theatre arts

A member of Lawrence’s theatre arts department since 2012, Pitts has served as set design and staging coordinator and well as department lecturer. He has worked on six Lawrence productions, including designing the set for this year’s play and opera versions of “Street Scene.” Prior to Lawrence, Pitts spent seven years teaching at Columbia College Chicago and three years as summer lab instructor at the University of Chicago Laboratory School. His extensive experience includes set design work on more than 85 productions at four universities and nearly 20 regional and professional theatres throughout Wisconsin and Illinois, including the Milwaukee Repertory Theatre and Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre. He earned a bachelor’s degree in technical theatre from Sam Houston State University and a master’s degree in theatre design from Northwestern University.

• Lavanya Proctor, anthropology

Lavanya Proctor, assistant professor of anthropology

Lavanya Proctor, assistant professor of anthropology

Proctor returns to Lawrence after spending 2010-2012 here, first as a visiting assistant professor and then as a Schmidt post-doctoral Fellow. She rejoins the faculty from SUNY-Buffalo State, where she was a lecturer in the anthropology department for two years. She is currently completing a book entitled “An Embattled Education: Language, Class and Mobility in New Delhi.” The recipient of an American Anthropological Association Leadership Fellow position in 2013, Proctor has focused her scholarship interests on linguistic anthropology, gender, class, education and India. She earned a bachelor’s and two master’s degrees in sociology at the University of Delhi as well as a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Iowa.

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Melissa Range, assistant professor of English

• Melissa Range, English

Range received her Ph.D. in English and creative writing from the University of Missouri. She has been the recipient of several national prizes in creative writing for poetry, including the 2011 Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Prize, and was recognized with the University of Missouri’s teaching award for creative writing in 2013. Range has conducted more than a dozen invited poetry readings, has written numerous journal publications and is the author of the book “Horse and Rider: Poems,” which centers on violence and power in religion and the natural world. Range earned her bachelor’s degree in English and creative writing from the University of Tennessee, her master’s degree in creative writing from Old Dominion University and also holds a master of theological studies from the Chandler School of Theology at Emory University.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Percussion Power: Eight Concerts Highlight Zeltsman Marimba Festival June 29-July 12

Posted on: June 24th, 2014 by Rick Peterson
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Michael Tilson Thomas’ “Island Music,” featuring four marimbists and two percussionists, will be performed Saturday, July 5 in Stansbury Theatre as one of the festival’s eight concerts. (Photo by Michael Ptacin.)

For two weeks, Lawrence University will be the center of all things marimba.

Lawrence welcomes nearly 60 musicians — world-class, international performers as well as dedicated up-and-coming artists — to campus June 29-July 12 for the 12th annual Zeltsman Marimba Festival, an educational forum and concert series celebrating percussion. This will be the sixth time in the festival’s history Lawrence has served as host.

One of the largest gatherings of marimba students and professionals in the world, the festival features a series of eight public concerts by an impressive slate of performers from around the world. With a diverse array of styles, the concerts offer an unparalleled opportunity to experience the marimba’s versatility.

Percussionist Dane Richeson, professor of music at Lawrence, is one of the festival’s faculty members and guest performers. He says the festival provides an uncommon treat for music lovers.

“It is an honor to have the Zeltsman Marimba Festival back at Lawrence. This is an exciting event that provides the Fox Cities the chance to experience music they have never heard before on an instrument with an ancient history,” said Richeson. “Audiences will have the rare opportunity to see some of the greatest marimba artists, many of whom rarely come to the Midwest, perform solo and chamber music works. Since many of these works have not been released on CD, this will likely be the only chance to hear this music.”

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Jack Van Geem (left) and Nancy Zeltsman will be among the performers at this year’s mirimba festival June 29-July 12 on the Lawrence campus. (Photo by Claudia Hansen.)

In addition to Richeson, Lawrence faculty members Mark Urness (bass) and Anthony Padilla (piano) and 2007 Lawrence graduate Michael Truesdell, also will be among the performers.

The concert series schedule:

 Sunday, June 29 — Dane Richeson / Mike Truesdell, percussion virtuosi; 7:30 p.m., Harper Hall.

 Wednesday, July 2 — Jack Van Geem, “The Dance / Jonathan Singer, marimba explorations of dance music, ragtime and more; 7:30 p.m. Lawrence Memorial Chapel. Free pre-concert talk: “Introduction to the Marimba,” 6:30 – 7 p.m.

 Thursday, July 3 — Nanae Mimura (Japan) / Alejandro Ruiz (Colombia), cross-cultural marimba virtuosi; 7:30 p.m., Lawrence Memorial Chapel. Free pre-concert fun: Xylopholks, 6:30 – 7 p.m.

 Saturday, July 5 — Stars of Zeltsman Marimba Festival, “Island Music,” a rare performance of Michael Tilson Thomas’ sensational work for four marimbists and two percussionists, and other extravagant adventures with mallets; 7:30 p.m., Stansbury Theatre.

 Monday, July 7 — Nancy Zeltsman, sotto voce / various artists, multi-media marimba and more; 7:30 p.m., Harper Hall.

• Wednesday, July 9 — Jean Geoffroy (France) / Joint Venture Percussion Duo (China/Luxembourg), great artists from abroad; 7:30 p.m., Lawrence Memorial Chapel.

• Friday, July 11 — Anders Åstrand (Sweden) / Mark Urness, bass / Dane Richeson, drums, an evening of jazz and more; 7:30 p.m., Harper Hall.

 Saturday, July 12 — Participants Marathon Concert; Noon – 5 p.m., Lawrence Memorial Chapel.

Tickets for the concert are available at the door at $15 for adults, $10 for students/seniors (cash only). Tickets can also be ordered in advance with a credit card at ZMFconcerts.evenbrite.com.

Five free concerts also will be conducted:

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The plaza outside the Warch Campus Center will be the site for two, free, lunch-time concerts on July 2 and July 9 during the Zeltsman Mirimba Festival.

• Wednesday, July 2 — 11:30 a.m – 1:30 p.m., Griff’s Grill, Boldt Plaza (outside Warch Campus Center).

• Wednesday, July 2 — Pre-concert talk: “Introduction to the Marimba,” 6:30 -7 p.m. Lawrence Memorial Chapel.

• Thursday, July 3 — Pre-concert fun: Xylopholks, 6:30 -7 p.m., Lawrence Memorial Chapel.

 Friday, July 4 — “Island Music” open rehearsal; 11:30 a.m. — 1:30 p.m., Cloak Theatre, Music-Drama Center.

• Wednesday, July 9 — Lunchtime Marimba Concert, 11:30 a.m -1:30 p.m., Griff’s Grill, Boldt Plaza.

Zeltsman, who teaches marimba at Berklee College of Music and the Boston Conservatory, where she is chair of the percussion department, launched the festival in 2001 to bring people together “to share unforgettable, stimulating musical experiences in an atmosphere of support and camaraderie.”

“I’m thrilled that ZMF will bring together so many acclaimed artists and talented young musicians to share their music and collaborate with each other,” says Zeltsman. “Marimbists aren’t ‘household names,’ but we hope people will take a leap of faith and experience some remarkable performances and exciting, thought-provoking, moving music.”

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Reunion Recognition: Lawrence Salutes Seven Alumni for Achievement, Service

Posted on: June 19th, 2014 by Rick Peterson

Just imagine if Garth Neustadter had decided to pursue a major in music composition instead of performance majors in violin and voice while a student at Lawrence University.

At the tender age of 28, the multi-talented Neustadter already has racked up an armful of honors for writing film scores — including a 2011 Emmy Award — since graduating in 2010.

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Garth Neustadter ’10

Neustatder will be among seven alumni recognized for career achievements, contributions to the betterment of society or volunteer service to Lawrence during the college’s annual alumni reunion celebration June 19-22.

With more than 1,000 alumni and guests from 43 states and two countries (Canada and India) expected to attend, it will be Lawrence’s largest reunion event in the past 10 years and one of the college’s largest ever.

The alumni awards will be presented Saturday, June 21 at the Reunion Convocation at 10:30 a.m. in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel. The event is free and open to the public. A live webcast of the Reunion Convocation ceremony will be available at http://www.livestream.com/lawrenceuniversity.

Members of the Lawrence 50-Year Connection, a growing cohort of alumni who graduated at least 50 years ago, get reunion activities started Thursday, June 19 with a series of panel presentations and small-group discussions.

The 2014 alumni awards and the recipients.

 Nathan M. Pusey Young Alumni Distinguished Achievement Award — Garth Neustadter, Class of 2010, Pasadena, Calif.  The award recognizes Lawrence alumni of 15 years or less for significant contributions to, and achievements in, a career field.  The award honors the 10th and youngest president of Lawrence and an exemplary figure in higher education in the 20th century.

A native of Manitowoc, Neustadter has been racking up music awards since his high school days, when he won the first of his five Downbeat awards in the magazine’s annual student music competition.

“Lawrence continually challenged me to broaden the diversity
of my interests both musically and intellectually.”

       — Garth Neustadter ’10

While at Lawrence, he earned first-prize honors (second place behind the grand prize winner) in the 2007 Young Film Composers Competition sponsored by Turner Classic Movies. A year later, TCM commissioned him to write an original score for a restored version of the 1923 silent film “The White Sister.” In 2011, he became one of the youngest composers to receive an Emmy Award for his score for the PBS American Masters documentary “John Muir in the New World,” a work he also wrote while at Lawrence.

In addition to TCM and PBS, he has composed feature-length scores for Warner Bros. and China’s CCTV. Most recently, some of his compositions were selected for upcoming performance seasons by Grammy Award-winning violinist Hilary Hahn.

His work has been recognized several times by the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP), including the Morton Gould Young Composer Award, the Jazz Composers Award and a film scoring fellowship. He was was the recipient of the prestigious Rappaport Prize for Music Composition.

“Lawrence continually challenged me to broaden the diversity of my interests both musically and intellectually,” said Neustadter, who earned a master of music degree in composition summa cum laude from Yale School of Music in 2012. “In addition to providing world-class training in my chosen disciplines, they encouraged me to develop the ‘entrepreneurial’ and ‘thinking’ skills necessary for continued self-discovery and reinvention.”

 Lucia Russell Briggs Distinguished Achievement Award — Peter Betzer, Class of 1964, St. Petersburg, Fla., and Dr. Richard Fessler, Class of 1974, Winnetka, Ill.  The award recognizes a Lawrence or Milwaukee-Downer graduate of more than 15 years for outstanding career achievement. The award honors the second president of Milwaukee-Downer College, one of the most beloved and influential figures in that college’s history.

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Peter Betzer ’64

Betzer is the current president of the St. Petersburg Downtown Partnership, for which he is leading efforts to turn the city into an internationally recognized center for marine research. During a near 40-year career in higher education at the University of South Florida, Betzer served as dean and professor of USF’s College of Marine Science, helping to transform it into a world-renowned research center that today includes 10 agencies employing more than 1,500 people.

An oceanographer, Betzer has participated in expeditions in the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans, the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. He has served on the Ocean Sciences Advisory Panel for the National Science Foundation and the University National Oceanographic Laboratory System Council, among others.

The author of more than 60 scientific publications, Betzer was a co-recipient of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Distinguished Authorship Award in 1985 and has delivered invited lectures in the Soviet Union, Australia, China and at England’s Oxford University.

Betzer says his time as a Lawrence student was “for exploring many new ideas and expanding horizons that began a life-long transformation.”

“The active involvement and genuine interest of Lawrence faculty were especially pivotal to my growth, just as they have always been to generations of Lawrentians,” said Betzer, a geology major at Lawrence who went on to earn a Ph.D. in chemical oceanography from the University of Rhode Island’s School of Oceanography. “The advice and encouragement of faculty and the enduring friendships I made at Lawrence underscore the substantive advantage of a liberal education; one that propelled me forward over 50 years ago and thankfully continues inspiring undergraduates today.”

Fessler, an internationally acclaimed researcher and surgeon, has dedicated his career to finding innovative methods to repair spinal cord injuries. A professor of neurosurgery at Chicago’s Rush University Medical Center, Fessler is widely considered the “father” of minimally invasive spine surgery and is credited with developing many of the surgical techniques being used today.

“The active involvement and genuine interest of Lawrence faculty were especially pivotal to my growth, just as they have always been to generations of Lawrentians.”
       – Peter Betzer ’64

He was the first surgeon in the United States to perform human embryonic spinal cord transplantation and among the first to perform minimally invasive scoliosis surgery. He twice performed microdiscectomy surgery on NFL quarterback Peyton Manning. He’s also served as a medical specialist and flight surgeon for NASA’s Space Shuttle missions.

Prior to joining Rush Medical Center, Fessler was professor and vice chair of neurosurgery at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. He also held the John Harper Seeley Professorship and was chief of neurosurgery at the University of Chicago Hospitals and Clinics.

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Dr. Richard Fessler ’74

Routinely listed in “Best Doctors of America,” Fessler founded and directed the Institute for Spine Care at the Chicago Institute of Neurosurgery and Neuroresearch. Other positions include director of clinical services and education at the University of Florida Brain Institute.

After earning a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Lawrence, Fessler pursued a master’s degree in experimental psychology at North Dakota State University. He credits a chance encounter with former Lawrence clinical psychologist Edwin Olson for changing the direction of his career.

“I attended the Midwest Psychology Conference to interview for jobs, but no one was interested in a person with just a master’s degree,” said Fessler. “As I was running out of prospects, I bumped into Ed Olson, literally, in an elevator. He knew someone who was looking for a person with exactly my background and set up an interview. That led to a job at the University of Chicago, followed by my Ph.D. and M.D. and ultimately, my career.

“What’s amazing is I never actually had a course with Dr. Olson. He only knew me through some independent studies at the Winnebago State Mental Health Institute. And yet he went out of his way to help me even after I had left Lawrence.”

• The George B. Walter ’36 Service to Society Award — Renee (Goral) Boldt, Class of 1985, Appleton, and Judy Frater, Class of 1974, Kutch, India. The award recognizes an alumnus or alumna of Lawrence or Milwaukee-Downer who best exemplifies the ideals of a liberal education through its application to socially useful ends in the community, the nation or the world. This award honors George B. Walter ’36, faculty member, coach and dean of men, whose work at the college and beyond was guided by his conviction that every individual can and should make a positive difference in the world.

Boldt has shared her time, talents and expertise to a wide variety of nonprofit organizations throughout Wisconsin. A member of the Lawrence University Board of Trustees, Boldt also plays key roles on the boards of the American Players Theater, the Appleton Education Initiative Foundation, the Wisconsin Historical Society Foundation, Friends of the Appleton Public Library and the Fox Valley Symphony.

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Renee Boldt ’85

She previously held board positions with the Circus World Museum Foundation, the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region, Harbor House Domestic Abuse Programs, Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, the Center for Applied Research and Services at UW–Oshkosh, LEAVEN and the Wisconsin Women’s Council.

Last month, Boldt and her husband, Tom, were honored with the Walter L. Rugland Community Service Award as part of the Fox Cites’ annual “Celebrating Our Volunteers” event.

As a local resident, Boldt says she’s reminded of “the incredible work being accomplished by students, faculty and administration” every time she drives past campus.

“I think about how my professors helped me define who I am and gave me the confidence to not only examine my values, ideas and actions, but also question them,” said Boldt. “Because of the residential nature of Lawrence, interaction between students and the Appleton community encourages a critical examination of values, ideas and actions. I couldn’t be prouder of my alma mater. Since its founding, it has been transforming lives by equipping its graduates to be problem solvers, confident of who they are, but comfortable deriving solutions from diverse populations and multiple view points.”

“Going to Lawrence provided some special opportunities.
Above all, I appreciated the chance to explore…the
liberal arts education encouraged me to experiment.”

         – Judy Frater, ’74

Frater has been a leader in preserving and protecting traditional textile arts in the Kutch District of Gujarat, India. Working with local Indian embroiderers, she founded Kala Raksha Trust in 1993, a grassroots social enterprise devoted to preserving their traditional arts of exquisite hand-embroidered and patch-worked products. The enterprise has since grown to a collection of nearly 1,000 artisans.

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Judy Frater ’74

She later guided the Kala Raksha Trust in establishing the Kala Raksha Museum, which houses a collection of heirloom textiles. Through the power of the Internet, people from around the world can view precious textiles and learn more about the tradition.

In 2005, with the support of an Ashoka Foundation Fellowship, Frater established Kala Raksha Vidhyalaya, the first design institution for traditional artisans, who learn skills relevant to their craft and innovative ways to bring their pieces to market. Since its founding, Kala Raksha Vidhyalaya has graduated 124 artisan designers.

Frater is currently working with Somaiya Kala Vidya, a new institution she founded for the education of artisans to expand the original program into a three-year institute that includes a graduate course in management and business for artisans and courses in craft traditions taught by artisan designers.

“Going to Lawrence provided some special opportunities. Above all, I appreciated the chance to explore,” said Frater, who grew up in the craft village of New Hope, Pa. “I did not know that anthropology existed before coming to Lawrence. The liberal arts education encouraged me to experiment. I benefited from a particularly experimental era, when I could travel to India to do independent research.

“With Lawrence’s small, intimate environment, students can interact with faculty on a personal basis and are nurtured in directions that seem beneficial to them,” Frater added. “I also benefited from a diverse student body. I learned from my colleagues by experiencing their diverse backgrounds and views. I am thankful for my Lawrence experience. It surely contributed to who I am today.”

 The Gertrude Breithaupt Jupp M-D’18 Outstanding Service Award — Ruth (Legler) Qualich, Milwaukee-Downer Class of 1955, Pewaukee, and Cynthia (Liebich) Reff, Class of 1963, Appleton. The award recognizes an alumnus or alumna of Lawrence or Milwaukee-Downer after his/her 15th Cluster Reunion who has provided outstanding service to Lawrence University. This award honors Gertrude Breithaupt Jupp, voted Milwaukee-Downer alumna of the year in 1964 for her long-standing service to the college as president of the alumnae association board, class secretary and public relations officer.

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Ruth Qualich M-D ’55

Ever the proud “Downerite at Lawrence,” Qualich is the co-chair of the committee planning this year’s 50th anniversary celebration of the consolidation between Milwaukee Downer College and Lawrence. She also is a member of the 50-Year Connection planning committee and has served as a moderator and panel member at 50YC events.

Qualich previously has served as a member of the Lawrence University Alumni Association board and on the 40th and 50th Reunion planning committees for her class. She is also a member of the Founder’s Club and Lawrence-Downer Legacy Circle.

“The experience at Milwaukee-Downer College was a time of growing both academically and socially. The traditions that we observed there helped to bring us together in relationships that last to this day,” said Qualich, who earned a bachelor’s and master’s degrees in chemistry from M-D and Wellesley College, respectively, then returned to Milwaukee-Downer and taught chemistry there from 1957-59.

“Coming to Lawrence for reunions and getting to know the staff and Lawrence alumni, I am pleased to be more and more a part of Lawrence University, to be Downer at Lawrence. The more I become involved the more I feel that both Milwaukee-Downer College and Lawrence University are my alma mater.”

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Cynthia Reff ’63

Reff’s license plate says it all: LU FANS. She, along with her husband, Chuck, are legendary for their support of Lawrence athletics and athletes. Beyond loyal attendance at home and sometimes road games — they both rode the fan bus eight-plus hours to Storm Lake, Iowa in 2004 to cheer on the men’s basketball team in the NCAA tournament — Reff routinely provides home-baked treats for teams before road trips and hosts dinners for the men’s and women’s basketball teams.

Hers and Chuck’s dedication was recognized with the 2007 Bob “Dinger” Wurdinger Athletic Service Award, which has been presented annually since 2006 to individuals who have throughout the years shown great support to Lawrence athletics. She is a member of the Lawrence Athletics Advisory Committee and is assisting with the Banta Bowl renovation efforts.

A former class secretary, Reff also has served as a reunion steering committee member for her 45th cluster reunion and as a reunion committee member and reprise coordinator for her 50th Reunion. During the most recent presidential search, she served on one of the candidate interview committees and is a member of the Boynton Society.

“If I had to point to one thing, other than family and friends,
that makes me extremely proud, it is my relationship with
Lawrence for the last 55 years.”

           — “Cinny” Reff ’63

“It is hard not to be an avid fan and proud alum when your mom, sister, brother and son all graduated from Lawrence,” said Reff. “The biggest reward for us has been getting to know students as freshmen and watching them mature and go on to graduate. We then have the opportunity to follow them as young alumni. They know we are there for them in the good times and the trying ones. If I had to point to one thing, other than family and friends, that makes me extremely proud, it is my relationship with Lawrence for the last 55 years.”

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence Commemorates 50th Anniversary of Consolidation with Milwaukee-Downer College

Posted on: June 17th, 2014 by Rick Peterson
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Colors Day at Milwaukee-Downer College in 1946.

The 50th anniversary of one of the seminal moments in the college’s history will be commemorated June 19-22 as part of Lawrence University’s annual alumni reunion celebration.

A consolidation between Lawrence and Milwaukee-Downer College, one of the first all-women’s colleges in the Midwest, was finalized on July 1, 1964, ending an era for a pioneering institution that traced its roots to the mid-1800s.

That fall, Lawrence welcomed 21 former Milwaukee-Downer faculty and 49 of its  continuing female students to Appleton.  Forty-four of the original 49 Milwaukee-Downer students went on to earn a bachelor’s degree from Lawrence while 11 of the faculty members remained at Lawrence until their retirement.

Marjory Irvin, one of the faculty members who made the transition to Lawrence, recalled the 1963-64 academic year at Milwaukee-Downer as a very trying one for all parties involved.

“For those (students) who chose to come to Lawrence, mostly upperclassman, the future was straightforward. There would be no stumbling blocks on the road toward graduation,” said Irvin, who taught piano and music theory. “The problem arose with those students who charged us, the faculty, with finding them a college just like Milwaukee-Downer. That wasn’t just difficult, it proved to be impossible.”

Irvin, who began a 40-year teaching career at Milwaukee-Downer in 1947 and ended it at Lawrence with her retirement in 1987, said one of the challenges she faced at Lawrence was dealing with a set of student questions completely foreign to her.

“In 50 years we have come from tears to cheers. Milwaukee-Downer
is alive and well as an integral part of Lawrence University.”

     — Marlene Crupi Widen, M-D ’55

“In my 16 years at Milwaukee-Downer, I dealt with all manner of problems facing young women, but those were very different from the ones that came knocking on my door once I got to Lawrence,” said Irvin, who will participate in a discussion on the consolidation Thursday (6/19) morning in the Warch Campus Center. “Because of gender, there were all these new problems with which I had no experience.”

M-D-Transfers_newsblog

Some of the 21 Milwaukee-Downer faculty and 49 students who transferred to Lawrence in the fall of 1964.

In looking back on the transition, Irvin recalls fondly the welcome she received from her colleagues.

“The Lawrence faculty members were incredibly hospitable. It seemed everyone invited me for dinner and entertained me royally with gourmet cuisine and fine wines. My career at Lawrence grew from an inauspicious beginning to a tenure of pure joy. I’ll always treasure the memories of my 23 years at Lawrence as well as my 16 years at Milwaukee-Downer.”

Lee (Dodds) Chemel was a junior from Stamford, Conn., at Milwaukee-Downer when the word came out the college would be closing.

“It was quite a shock,” said Chemel, a television and film director now living in Los Angeles. “There were a lot of women on campus for whom it was a very negative experience. They had chosen a women’s college, and a small one at that, for the kind of intimate and even protective environment that was offered there.

“But for me, though I loved my years at Downer, I was ready to expand, to be on a larger campus with many more opportunities. And I was really excited that I was going to be with guys.”

Before the end of her last year at Downer, Chemel visited Lawrence and was invited to participate in what was then an academic encampment weekend.

“I got to meet and know some of the most involved students at Lawrence, some of whom would become life-long friends,” said Chemel, who graduated from Lawrence in 1965 with a major in English. “I also had a chance to see a great production of ‘Macbeth’ and knew that the theatre department was going to be a place where I wanted to work and learn. By the time my visit to Lawrence was over, I was locked and loaded and ready to leap. I’m so glad I had the chance.”

Even though she had graduated from Milwaukee-Downer nine years earlier, Marlene (Crupi) Widen was still directly affected by the consolidation announcement: she was the incoming M-D alumnae president at the time.

“I was unsure of my new role, but my husband wisely told me, ‘you need to stay involved. Milwaukee-Downer is bringing much to this merger and you need to help make it happen,’” said Widen, who was recognized at 2013’s reunion with the college’s Presidential Award. “I’m so glad I did. We all can be so proud of an educational legacy of which we all share. In 50 years we have come from tears to cheers. Milwaukee-Downer is alive and well as an integral part of Lawrence University.”

M-D-Hawthorn_newsblog

In 1965, some former Milwaukee-Downer students planted a hawthorn tree in front of Main Hall.

A series of events during the weekend will highlight the Milwaukee-Downer and Lawrence connection. They include:

•  a discussion on the consolidation moderated by Ruth Legler Qualich and Ted Katzoff, 1955 Milwaukee-Downer and 1965 Lawrence graduates, respectively.

  a presentation by Lawrence archivist Erin Dix, examining the historic context of how and why the consolidation took place and its impact today.

an art exhibition featuring works of three Milwaukee-Downer studio art faculty — Dane Purdo, Carl Riter and Arthur Thrall — who joined the Lawrence faculty at the time of the consolidation.

•  a presentation on Catharine Beecher, a renowned 19th-century educator and champion of higher education for women, “founding spirit” for Milwaukee College and sister of Harriet Beecher Stowe, by Carolyn King Stephens, a 1962 Milwaukee-Downer graduate.

  a ceremony commemorating the new Jason Downer Common on campus, including the addition of historical signage of the consolidation, followed by a tour that will include numerous Milwaukee-Downer treasures, including the exquisite Teakwood Room.

“We are very much looking forward to this weekend’s celebration,” said Mark Breseman, associate vice president of alumni and constituency engagement at Lawrence. “It is a wonderful opportunity to commemorate the joining of two special colleges. It has been a particular thrill for me to work with many wonderful Milwaukee-Downer alumnae to plan this exciting and historical series of events. Lawrence takes pride in the many ways it has kept the true Milwaukee-Downer spirit alive on campus.”

Fifty years after the consolidation, Lawrence counts nearly 1,000 living Milwaukee-Downer graduates among its alumni.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Three LU Faculty Honored at Commencement for Teaching Excellence, Creative Activity

Posted on: June 15th, 2014 by Rick Peterson
 Amid the pomp and circumstance of Lawrence University’s 165th commencement Sunday, June 15, three members of the faculty were recognized for teaching excellence and creative activity.
Tim-Spurgin_newsblog

Timothy Spurgin

Timothy Spurgin, associate professor of English and Bonnie Glidden Buchanan Professor of English Literature, received the Award for Excellence in Teaching, which recognizes outstanding performance in the teaching process, including the quest to ensure students reach their full development as individuals, human beings and future leaders of society.

A member of the faculty since 1990, Spurgin previously was recognized with Lawrence’s Young Teacher Award (1993) and the college’s Freshman Studies Teaching Award (1994). He is one of only four faculty members in the history of the awards to receive all three teaching honors.

Spurgin’s scholarly interests focus on 19th-century English literature, especially the novel and works of Charles Dickens, as well as literary criticism and theory.  His scholarship has been published in the academic journals Dickens Quarterly, Dickens Studies Annual and the Minnesota Review.

In presenting Spurgin his award, Provost and Dean of the Faculty David Burrows cited him for his teaching that extends “well beyond the confines of our classrooms.”

“You help students and faculty learn in countless ways; through individual conferences in your office, presentations at Freshman Studies symposia, discussion group sessions on new ideas about our educational mission, and private advisory sessions that help colleagues develop their own teaching abilities,” said Burrows. “Your firm but calm approach is a form of teaching that makes the entire campus a place where learning flourishes.”

Spurgin also has been a four-time recipient of Lawrence’s Babcock Award, most recently in 2009, for “giving generously of his time and energy to assist students.” After graduating Phi Beta Kappa from Carleton College, Spurgin earned his doctorate in English at the University of Virginia.

“You help students and faculty learn in countless ways…your firm but calm approach is a form of teaching that makes the entire campus a place where learning flourishes.”
           — Provost David Burrows on Timothy Spurgin

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Monica Rico

Monica Rico, associate professor of history, received the award for Excellence in Creative Activity. Established in 2006, the award recognizes outstanding creative work for advancing Lawrence’s mission.

Rico joined the faculty in 2001 and served as the college’s Pieper Family Professor of Servant Leadership and director of engaged learning from 2010-2013.

Her scholarship focuses on gender and cultural history, especially of the American West. She is the author of the 2013 book “Nature’s Noblemen: Masculinities on the Nineteenth-century Transatlantic Frontier” (Yale University Press), which explores how British and American men performed and constructed masculinity in their encounters with the 19th-century American West and with each other.

Burrows praised Rico for her “consistent excellence and brilliance as a scholar” in presenting her the award.

“Your devotion to history and its power to understand the human condition has led you to study many other topics, notably the history of travel to Africa,” said Burrows. “You have used your knowledge to provide support for colleagues in a variety of areas. You also delved deeply into the scholarship of community-based engagement while serving as the Pieper Family Chair of Servant-Leadership. It is clear that you are a person of great intelligence and thoroughness who will continue to devote yourself to insightful scholarship for many years to come.”

In January, Rico was recognized as one of the winners of the 4th Annual Fox Cities Future 15 Young Professionals awards, which honors young business and community leaders for their efforts in work, civic and charitable causes.

She attended the University of California-Berkeley, earning a bachelor’s degree with majors in history and political science as well as a master’s and a doctoral degree.

“It is clear that you are a person of great intelligence and thoroughness who will continue to devote yourself to insightful scholarship for many years to come.”
               — Provost David Burrows on Monica Rico

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Stephen Sieck

Stephen Sieck, assistant professor of music and co-director of choral studies, received the Young Teacher Award in recognition of demonstrated excellence in the classroom and the promise of continued growth.

A member of the faculty since 2010, Sieck directs Lawrence’s 110-voice Viking Chorale and co-directs Cantala women’s choir and Concert Choir. His research interests include diction pedagogy and he has published articles on British composer/conductor Benjamin Britten and renowned American composer Aaron Copland.

In presenting him his award, Burrows said his success could be attributed to “a wonderful combination of passion, an insistence on high standards of achievement and care for your students.”

“Colleagues also praise your generosity and admire you for the culture of artistic accomplishment you help create,” Burrows added. “You clearly are a part of making the Lawrence University Conservatory of Music a world-class musical institution.”

In March, Sieck co-directed the Concert Choir and Cantala at the 2014 American Choral Directors Association North Central Regional Conference in Des Moines, Iowa.

“You clearly are a part of making the Lawrence University Conservatory of Music a world-class musical institution.”
               — Provost David Burrows on Stephen Sieck

Sieck, who also serves as the music director at Neenah’s First Presbyterian Church, earned a bachelor of arts degree with a major in music from the University of Chicago and a master’s and a doctoral degree in choral conducting from the University of Illinois.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Broadcast Journalist Charles Gibson to Deliver Commencement Address to Record Number of Graduates

Posted on: June 12th, 2014 by Rick Peterson

Award-winning broadcast journalist Charles Gibson will deliver Lawrence University’s principal commencement address to a school-record number of graduates Sunday, June 15 at the college’s 165th commencement ceremony.

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Charles Gibson spent 33 years of his 40-year broadcast career with ABC News.

Lawrence will award an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree to Gibson, whose distinguished television career spanned more than 40 years, including 33 at ABC News, where he was anchor of “World News” and co-anchor of “Good Morning, America,.”

Commencement exercises for the largest graduating class in school history begin at 10:30 a.m. on Main Hall green. Lawrence is expected to award a school record 387 bachelor degrees to 370 students from 35 states and 20 countries. A live webcast of the commencement ceremony will be available at http://www.livestream.com/lawrenceuniversity.

President Mark Burstein, who will preside over his first commencement, along with Lawrence Board of Trustees Chair Terry Franke and senior Fanny Lau from Chicago, will join Gibson in addressing the graduates.

Prior to commencement, Lawrence will hold a baccalaureate service Saturday, June 14 at 11 a.m. in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel. Stephen Sieck, assistant professor of music and co-director of choral studies, presents “The Wonder of Unfairness: Why You Can Be Happier than My Dogs.” The baccalaureate service and commencement exercise are both free and open to the public.

Two retiring faculty members, Richmond Frielund, associate professor of theatre arts, and Richard Yatzeck, professor of Russian, will be recognized for their 34 and 48 years of service, respectively, with honorary master of arts degrees, ad eundem, as part of the graduation ceremonies.

Gibson joined ABC News in 1975 and held all of the network’s highest profile anchor positions during his three-plus decade career there, including 18 years at “Good Morning, America,” (1987-98; 1999-2006), six at “Primetime” (1998-2004) and three-and-a-half (2006-09) at the anchor desk of “World News.”

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Lawrence will award broadcaster Charles Gibson his third honorary degree as part of the college’s 165th commencement.

Upon Gibson’s retirement in December, 2009, ABC News President David Westin said, “The first rough draft of history over this generation has been seen by an entire nation through the eyes of Charlie Gibson.”

Among Gibson’s many career highlights were interviews with seven sitting presidents, serving as moderator for two presidential debates and investigating the Space Shuttle Columbia tragedy, for which he earned an Emmy Award.

Other noteworthy career reporting assignments include the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing of the Murrah Federal Building and the execution of convicted bomber Timothy McVeigh six years later, the 2005 death and funeral of Pope John Paul II from Vatican City, the shooting tragedy on the campus of Virginia Tech and interviews with world leaders ranging from U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan and British Prime Minister Tony Blair to the late Yasir Arafat and Nelson Mandela, among others.

A native of Evanston, Ill., Gibson grew up in Washington, D.C. and earned a bachelor’s degree in 1965 from Princeton University, where he launched his journalism career as the news director for the university’s campus radio station.

“The first rough draft of history over this generation has been seen by an entire nation through the eyes of Charlie Gibson.”
      – David Westin, President, ABC News

In addition to his 2004 Emmy Award, Gibson was recognized by the New York State Broadcasters Association with its 2010 Broadcaster of the Year award. He received a National Journalism Fellowship in 1973 from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the 2006 Paul White Award from the Radio and Television News Directors of America. Quinnipiac University honored him with the Fred Friendly First Amendment Award in 2008.

A member of the Board of Trustees at Princeton, Gibson has previously delivered commencement speeches at New York’s Vassar (1989) and Union (2007) colleges and New Jersey’s Monmouth University (2006).

Lawrence is the third college to award Gibson and honorary degree, joining Union and Monmouth.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.