Tag: “America’s Best Colleges

Enhanced Safety Features Coming to Campus Crosswalks on College Ave.

The Appleton Common Council Wednesday evening approved by a 12-3 vote a Lawrence University proposal to enhance pedestrian and driver safety at two crosswalks on College Ave.

The agreed-to improvements include upgrading eight existing lighting fixtures from 250 watts to 400 watts plus, adding two 1-arm lights near the crosswalks, installing in-roadway warning lights (IRWL) and four amber flashers for each crosswalk utilizing Rectangular Rapid Flash Beacon (RRFB) technology. In addition, Lawrence and the city have agreed to conduct joint efforts to educate users of the street and crosswalks to become smarter and safer drivers and pedestrians.

The safety enhancements will be accompanied by a two-year study designed by Dr. William Skinner, director of research administration and Dr. Rob Beck, professor of education, to measure their effectiveness in improving safety. Using a trained crew of staged pedestrians and technicians, the study will collect data on motorist-pedestrian interactions under a variety of conditions, including time of day, weather and visibility at the crosswalks located at Park and Union streets.

The IRWL and RRFB enhances are scheduled for installation in 2012.

Submit Your Guess for this Week’s Photo Contest; Pam Pierre ’96 is Week No. 2 Winner

Here's photo contest image no. 3. Good luck! (click to enlarge.)

Welcome to week no. 3 of this summer’s “Here’s Looking at LU Photo Contest.” Correctly identify this week’s photo (right) and you could win a cool prize and be eligible for a $50 gift card.

Congratulations to Pam Pierre ’96 of Naples, Fla., who correctly identified last week mystery photo as a window in the vestibule of the Wriston Art Center. Pamela was chosen by random drawing from among 22 correct responses as the winner of the LU sports tumbler.

Everyone who submitted a correct answer this week will be eligible for the grand prize drawing at the end of the contest.

Be sure to try send us your guess for this week’s photo of something found on campus.

How the contest works:

Weekly from now through the end of August, we’ll post a photo on the Lawrence website news page, and the headline “Here’s Looking at LU! Contest” on the website home page.

Study the photo carefully and, if you can identify the item or location pictured, send an email to communications@lawrence.edu (see link below), telling us what is in the photograph! Be sure to include your name and mailing address. (Limit one entry per week per email address.)

Win this LU Spirit Tumbler!

A prize each week:

Each week, all entrants with correct answers will be entered in a random drawing for a cool blue, 16 oz. Lawrence University “spirit tumbler.” The correct answer and the weekly prize winner will be announced the following Monday. (If no one correctly identifies the photo, two winners will be chosen the following week.)

On August 29, 2011, at the conclusion of the contest, one entry from among all correct contest entries will be chosen as the “Here’s Looking at LU!” grand prize winner. The grand prize winner will receive a $50 prize package from KK’s in the Warch Campus Center. The more weeks you enter, the better your chance of winning!

Official Contest Rules:

One photo will be posted on Lawrence’s website each Monday for the eight-week duration of the contest. Following the posting of each photo, entries may be submitted to communications@lawrence.edu until 12 midnight CDT (Central Daylight Time) the following Sunday. A weekly winner will be randomly selected by Lawrence University from among each week’s correct entries and all correct entries will be eligible for the grand prize drawing on August 29. By entering, you agree to have your name published on Lawrence University’s website and in other university communications. Lawrence University is not responsible for lost or misdirected entries.

Emmy Award Nomination Latest Triumph for Lawrence University Grad Garth Neustadter

The budding film composing career of Lawrence University graduate Garth Neustadter received a major boost Thursday (7/14) when the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences announced its 63rd annual Primetime Emmy nominations.

Neustadter was among five nominees for original dramatic score in the Outstanding Music Composition category for his work on the American Masters documentary “John Muir in The New World,” which aired on PBS in April. Neustadter’s score was performed by Lawrence Conservatory of Music students.

Brian Pertl ’86, dean of the conservatory, said this is a proud moment.   (Click on the arrow to listen.)

Unlike all of the other Emmy Award categories, in which the production company submits materials for the Academy’s consideration, the composition category requires the composer to submit the proper materials.

“I felt that it would be good experience to go through process of submitting, but I never expected these results,” said Neustadter, who earned a bachelor of music degree summa cum laude in violin and voice performance from Lawrence in 2010. He currently is pursuing graduate studies in music composition at Yale University.

The Emmy nominations are typically revealed in a live television broadcast at 5:30 a.m. Pacific time and also posted on the official Emmy Awards website. Neustadter was attending a film scoring session in Aspen, Colo., at the time and had to improvise.

“I didn’t have regular internet access, so I drove 10 miles to find WiFi access to read about the results,” he said. “It was a surreal experience to see my name. I am incredibly honored and humbled to be in the company of the veteran and talented composers in this category. I’m excited to meet the other nominees, including composer Alf Clausen of ‘The Simpsons,’ who has earned 30 nominations in his career.”

The 2011 documentary on the life and legacy of naturalist, author and scientist John Muir was written, produced and directed by Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Catherine Tatge, a 1972 Lawrence graduate. During the filmmaking process, Tatge turned to her alma mater, reaching out to Brian Pertl, dean of the conservatory, for a student to possibly write the film’s score. Pertl recommended Neustadter.

“Writing the score for the John Muir documentary has been an incredible opportunity and learning experience,” said Neustadter, a native of Manitowoc. “I am grateful to everyone involved in the project.”

Kimberly Clark Professor of Music Fred Sturm, who served as Neustadter’s faculty composition mentor as a Lawrence student, said he was elated but not surprised at his protege’s latest triumph.

“I’ve admired Garth’s music for several years now and I know the effort and artistry he dedicates to his work. I’m also familiar with the composing of each of his fellow nominees and though it may seem a stretch for a college graduate student to be included in that elite group, Garth absolutely deserves to be there. I won’t be surprised if he takes home the gold on this one.”

The Emmy nomination is the latest in an ever-growing list of accomplishments for Neustadter. He earned first-prize honors (second place behind the grand prize winner) in the 2007 Young Film Composers Competition sponsored by Turner Classic Movies. A year later he was commissioned by TCM to write an original score for a restored version of the 1923 silent film “The White Sister.” In April 2010, he was named one of 37 national winners of the 2010 ASCAP Foundation Morton Gould Young Composer Award for his 15-minute composition written for full orchestra and choir based on a Spanish text entitled “Oh llama de amor viva.”

This past April, Neustadter earned his fifth Downbeat award in the magazine’s annual student music competition for a five-minute arrangement of the 1946 Walter Gross jazz classic “Tenderly” he wrote for studio orchestra and vocalist in 2010.

The Emmy awards will be broadcast live on Fox Sunday, Sept. 18 from Los Angeles with actress Jane Lynch of “Glee” as host.

The soundtrack can be bought at KKs Store.

Week #2 of “Here’s Looking at LU” Photo Contest Underway; Week No. 1 Winner Announced

Here's photo contest image no. 2. Good luck! (click to enlarge.)

Week no. 1 of this summer’s “Here’s Looking at LU Photo Contest” generated 15 correct answers. Congratulations to Lynn Hagee ’58, director of conferences and summer programs at Lawrence, chosen by a purely random drawing as the winner of the LU sports tumbler. She knew the photo was one of four concrete casts located in the Music-Drama Center “court yard” outside Stansbury and Cloak theatres. They are based on larger works created for Chicago’s McCormick Center.

Congratulations to all who submitted a correct answer. Your names will be entered in the drawing for the grand prize at the end of the contest.

If you didn’t correctly identify that photo, try you luck with the photo for week no. 2. The “Here’s Looking at LU! Photo Contest” is a fun way to see if people can identify photos taken of various locations and objects around campus.

How the contest works:

Weekly from now through the end of August, we’ll post a photo on the Lawrence website news page, and the headline “Here’s Looking at LU! Contest” on the website home page.

Study the photo carefully and, if you can identify the item or location pictured, send an email to communications@lawrence.edu (see link below), telling us what is in the photograph! Be sure to include your name and mailing address. (Limit one entry per week per email address.)

Win this LU Spirit Tumbler!

A prize each week:

Each week, all entrants with correct answers will be entered in a random drawing for a cool blue, 16 oz. Lawrence University “spirit tumbler.” The correct answer and the weekly prize winner will be announced the following Monday. (If no one correctly identifies the photo, two winners will be chosen the following week.)

On August 29, 2011, at the conclusion of the contest, one entry from among all correct contest entries will be chosen as the “Here’s Looking at LU!” grand prize winner. The grand prize winner will receive a $50 prize package from KK’s in the Warch Campus Center. The more weeks you enter, the better your chance of winning!

Official Contest Rules:

One photo will be posted on Lawrence’s website each Monday for the eight-week duration of the contest. Following the posting of each photo, entries may be submitted to communications@lawrence.edu until 12 midnight CDT (Central Daylight Time) the following Sunday. A weekly winner will be randomly selected by Lawrence University from among each week’s correct entries and all correct entries will be eligible for the grand prize drawing on August 29. By entering, you agree to have your name published on Lawrence University’s website and in other university communications. Lawrence University is not responsible for lost or misdirected entries.

Enter the “Here’s Looking at LU!” Photo Contest

Here’s photo contest image #1. Good luck! (click to see full size image)

How observant were you during your student days or on your visits to campus? Do you think you know the nooks and crannies of Lawrence University? The “Here’s Looking at LU!” is a fun summer contest to see if you can identify photos taken of various locations and objects around campus.

How the contest works:

For each of the next eight weeks, we’ll post a photo on the Lawrence website news page, and the headline “Here’s Looking at LU! Contest” on the website home page.

Study the photo carefully and, if you can identify the item or location pictured, send an email to communications@lawrence.edu (see link below), telling us what is in the photograph!  Be sure to include your name and mailing address. (Limit one entry per week per email address.)

Win this LU Spirit Tumbler!

 

 

 

 

A prize each week:

Each week, all entrants with correct answers will be entered in a random drawing for a cool blue, 16 oz. Lawrence University “spirit tumbler.”  The correct answer and the weekly prize winner will be announced the following Monday. (If no one correctly identifies the photo, two winners will be chosen the following week.)

On August 29, 2011, at the conclusion of the contest, one entry from among all correct contest entries will be chosen as the “Here’s Looking at LU!” grand prize winner.  The grand prize winner will receive a $50 prize package from KK’s in the Warch Campus Center.  The more weeks you enter, the better your chance of winning!

Official Contest Rules:

One photo will be posted on Lawrence’s website each Monday for the eight-week duration of the contest.  Following the posting of each photo, entries may be submitted to communications@lawrence.edu until 12 midnight CDT (Central Daylight Time) the following Sunday. A weekly winner will be randomly selected by Lawrence University from among each week’s correct entries and all correct entries will be eligible for the grand prize drawing on August 29. By entering, you agree to have your name published on Lawrence University’s website and in other university communications. Lawrence University is not responsible for lost or misdirected entries.

Long-Serving Admissions Dean Looks Forward to Life without Student Applications

Having overseen the enrollment of more than 10,300 Lawrence University students — nearly 40 percent of all Lawrence alumni alive today — Steve Syverson is looking forward to reading something other than high school transcripts and lists of extracurricular activities.

After 28 years of shaping Lawrence’s student body as head of the college’s admission office, Syverson will retire at the end of June. He is the longest serving dean of admissions in the college’s history.

“When my wife Diana and I arrived at Lawrence in 1983, I envisioned a career in which I would move to a new college every five or six years,” said Syverson, vice president of enrollment and dean of admissions and financial aid. “Obviously, 28 years later, it’s clear that our love for Lawrence and the Fox Cities changed those plans dramatically.”

Steve Syverson, vice president of enrollment and dean of admissions and financial aid, is retiring June 30 after 28 years at Lawrence.

Not only did Syverson’s career plans change, but the college underwent its own transformation, physically and demographically. Seven new buildings have been built since he joined the college. Applications during his tenure soared from 879 his first year to 2,800 this year. Lawrence’s enrollment in the fall of 1983 was 1,028 and 50 percent of the students were from Wisconsin. By 2010, enrollment had increased 48 percent to 1,520 degree-seeking students, with more than 70 percent of the freshmen coming from out-of-state.

“Steve has done exceptional work for our college and conservatory over the years, strengthening the student applicant pool and building a first-rate team of admissions staff,” said Lawrence President Jill Beck. “His financial management has been crucial to the well-functioning of the university. We have all depended upon him to help sustain a vibrant academic and artistic core at Lawrence. Steve’s sense of how to achieve balance in our entering classes, including athletes, scientists, humanists, musicians and artists, students of diverse backgrounds, social scientists and geographic diversity, has been masterful.”

The goal of attracting bright, diverse and engaged students has remained constant the past two-plus decades, but the means of attracting them has undergone radical change since Syverson started.

“When I first arrived, my correspondence was typed by a secretary on a typewriter and re-typed from scratch if I made any edits,” said Syverson, a native of California. “In the late 1980’s, I recall getting talked into purchasing a contraption called a fax machine. Today we read our applications electronically on laptops and I haven’t sent a paper version of a memo in years.”

An outspoken critic of college rankings, Syverson has established himself as a nationally respected voice on the ethical treatment of students in the admissions process and has been interviewed numerous times for stories by The New York Times, Washington Post, PBS and others on the subject. He served as vice president of the National Association for College Admissions Counseling’s (NACAC) for admissions practices from 1988-91 and is a former president of the Wisconsin ACAC.

In 2005, Lawrence joined a growing movement of selective colleges to adopt a “test optional” admissions policy and Syverson subsequently served on the national Commission on the Use of Standardized Tests in Undergraduate Admissions.

“We need to challenge the perceived importance of the SAT and ACT,” Syverson said of the decision to go test-optional. “A student’s high school record is the best predictor of success in college, so if that student has done well in high school but has weaker test scores, they can ask that we not consider their scores.”

A past president of the Fox Cities chapter of Habitat for Humanity, Syverson plans to remain involved with the organization in retirement, as well as committing serious energy toward promoting the Certified Educational Planner, a national credential for college counselors.

“I believe strongly that every student should have access to good advice as they explore their post-secondary school options and the CEP will help families identify strong college counselors,” he said.

Ken Anselment, director of admissions at Lawrence since 2004, succeeds Syverson as dean of admissions and financial aid on July 1.

Lawrence University Hosts 10th Annual Zeltsman Marimba Festival

Some of the world’s most acclaimed percussionists, including Lawrence University’s own Dane Richeson, will perform June 26-July 9 during the two-week-long Zeltsman Marimba Festival held on the Lawrence campus.

The brainchild of Nancy Zeltsman, chair of the percussion department at the Boston Conservatory and associate professor at Berklee College of Music, the festival is one of the largest of its kind in the world.  This year’s, the 10th in the festival’s history, includes nine public concerts, featuring performances by world-class musicians on marimba and vibraphone.

Tickets for the public concerts are available at the door prior to the performance.

“The number of guest artists and participants from around the world makes this event a cornucopia of musical delight,” said Richeson, professor of music at Lawrence and one of this year’s festival faculty members. “The concerts are theme based and will feature several guest artists on a single program, a rare opportunity to see the marimba played by different virtuosos in a single concert.”

Richeson will be among 10 performers from 10 countries showcased in the festival’s opening concert, Sunday, June 26 at 8 p.m. in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel.

Also scheduled to perform during the festival is Mike Truesdell, a 2007 Lawrence graduate, a second-prize recipient from among 95 initial candidates at the 2010 TROMP International Percussion Competition conducted last November in Eindhoven, the Netherlands.

Lawrence University Receives $1.5 Million Gift to Establish Endowed Professorship in Music

A $1.5 million gift from a pair of life-long, music loving Lawrence University graduates will establish an endowed professorship in the college’s conservatory of music university officials announced today.

Cellist Janet Anthony, professor of music, will be the first holder of the new George and Marjorie Olsen Chandler Professorship in Music, effective July 1. Appointments to endowed professorships are made in recognition of academic and artistic distinction through teaching excellence and/or scholarly achievement.

The Chandler Professorship is the fourth endowed professorship established during Lawrence’s six-year, $150 million “More Light” campaign, which concludes in October.

“Professor Anthony has inspired students at Lawrence and around the world with her passion for music,” Lawrence President Jill Beck said in announcing the appointment. “She is a respected teacher, mentor and performer who has dedicated her career to enriching others’ lives with her scholarship and music.

“Janet Anthony is an extraordinary asset to the Lawrence faculty and to the Conservatory of Music and I am proud to be able to recognize her contributions with this professorship,” Beck added.

While George and Marjorie Chandler both attended Lawrence, they did not meet as students, having graduated seven years apart, 1951 and 1944, respectively. They married in 1962 and shared a mutual love of music — George sang in the choir as a student, Marjorie played piano — and an appreciation for their experiences at Lawrence.

George Chandler '51

Originally from Waukegan, Ill., George Chandler earned a degree magna cum laude in classics from Lawrence and went on to earn a law degree from the University of Illinois. He enjoyed a distinguished career as an attorney, planner and manager with the Interstate Commerce Commission and the U.S. Department of Transportation.  He retired in 1985 and makes his home today in Durham, N.C.

Marjorie Chandler, an Oshkosh native, graduated summa cum laude with a degree in psychology. She went on to earn her Ph.D. in psychology at the University of Minnesota. She was a statistician with Educational Testing Service in Princeton, N.J., and later in her career worked as a senior official at the National Center for Education Statistics in the U.S. Department of Education.  Marjorie died in 2003.

“We were always attracted to classical music,” said George Chandler in explaining the decision to endow a music professorship. “During our 35 years in the Washington D.C., area, it was a rare week when we failed to attend some kind of musical performance at the Kennedy Center, the National Cathedral or George Mason University. We selected our retirement home in North Carolina with the rich musical life provided largely by the many nearby colleges and universities in mind.”

He also credited many of his former professors for forging a life-long affection for Lawrence.

“Not only were they all brilliant teachers who knew how to draw the best out of their students, but they were able to make a callow youth brought up on the Chicago Tribune, ‘see the light,’” said Chandler.

The Chandlers met Anthony in the early 1990s when they took a Bjorklunden summer seminar on Mozart she taught. In 2007, the Lawrence Chamber Players, of which Anthony is a member, performed in Durham in George Chandler’s honor.

Professor of Music Janet Anthony

Anthony, an active soloist, recitalist and chamber musician, has taught cello at Lawrence since 1984. She has toured with the Vienna Chamber Orchestra, the Austrian Radio Orchestra and the Chamber Orchestra of the Vienna Symphony. She also has performed or taught in Argentina, China, Curacao, Japan, Venezuela and Vietnam and, as a member of the Duo Kléber, she has performed in England, France, Italy and Bosnia Herzegovina.

Since 1996, Anthony has made annual trips to Haiti to conduct, perform and teach at music schools there. She often takes students with her and to date, nearly 50 have accompanied her on her travels to assist at the schools.

After a devastating earthquake hit the country in 2010, Anthony helped organized a benefit concert in Appleton for Haiti and collected needed supplies for the survivors, including gently used instruments. Since the quake, she has performed in four memorial concerts in Haiti, including one this past Jan 12 — the one-year anniversary of the quake — for an audience of those who had lost their homes and who were living in tents on the main square of Jacmel, home of the Dessaix-Baptiste Music School, Haiti’s second largest, which was heavily damaged.

A frequent performer on Wisconsin Public Radio, Anthony earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Arizona and a master’s degree in music from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. She also studied at Vienna’s famed Hochschule für Musik und Darstellende Kunst.

Lawrence Ranked 36th by High School Counselors; 67th Among National Liberal Arts Colleges in Annual U.S. News Guide

Lawrence University was thought of more highly by high school guidance counselors than the editors at U.S. News & World Report in the magazine’s  2011 “America’s Best Colleges” report released today (8/17).

In addition to its overall rankings in national universities and national liberal arts colleges categories in its annual guide, U.S. News also includes lists and rankings of a wide variety of other niche categories, without regard for size or type of institution. Lawrence was ranked 36th nationally in a survey of guidance counselors from America’s best high schools who were asked which liberal arts colleges they think offer the best education to their students.  Among 250 national liberal arts colleges, Lawrence was ranked 67th.

One of numerous college guides released each August, U.S. News’ version uses a combination of subjective information, such as peer assessment as well as statistical analysis of a variety of factors it considers indicative of academic excellence — graduation rates, student retention and acceptance rates, among others — in determining its rankings.

Lawrence had strong showings in the areas of incoming students ranked in the top 10 percent of their high school class (38 percent), graduation rate (76 percent), full-time faculty (94 percent) and alumni giving rate (43 percent) while also showing increases in freshman retention rate (90 percent) and classes with less than 20 students (75 percent) from the previous year.

“We’re happy to see U.S. News report on things like our alumni giving rate, which, even in a challenging economy, continues to be among the nation’s highest as well as freshman retention rate, which in our case, was an increase over the previous year’s already high rate,” said Ken Anselment, director of admissions at Lawrence. “High student retention and alumni giving rates tell us that people’s satisfaction with their Lawrence experience is both consistent and lasting.

“Even more than the rankings,” Anselment added, “we’re thrilled to know that high school counselors — who best understand the nuances of quality and fit between students and colleges — continue to think very highly of the Lawrence experience and recommend it to some of their best students.”

Williams College of Massachusetts earned the magazine’s top spot in the national liberal arts college category for the seventh consecutive year. Harvard University was the top-ranked institution in U.S. News’ national universities category after sharing the no. 1 ranking last year with Princeton University, which was ranked second this year.

In compiling its annual “America’ s Best Colleges” guide, U.S. News & World Report evaluates nearly 1,500 of the nation’s public and private four-year schools, using data from up to 16 separate factors, each of which is assigned a “weight” that reflects the magazine editor’s judgment as to how much that measure matters. Each school’s composite weighted score is then compared to peer institutions to determine final rankings.

Institutions are divided into several distinct categories. In addition to the best liberal arts college category that measures national institutions like Lawrence, other rankings are based on universities that grant master and doctorate degrees and colleges that are considered “regional” institutions.