Tag: Appleton

Academy of Music Bel Canto Girl Choir Performing at Regional Choral Director’s Conference

Bel Canto, the 60-member high school component of the Lawrence Academy of Music Girl Choir program, will perform this week at the North Central Division “Beyond the Notes” conference of the American Choral Directors Association in Madison.

Under the direction of Karen Bruno, Bel Canto was the only school-aged ensemble from Wisconsin selected to sing at the four-day (Feb.8-11) convention, which features choirs and choral directors from six states. Only 14 choirs total were chosen to sing at the conference.

Bel Canto will perform a 25-minute program Thursday, Feb. 9 at 9:30 a.m. at the Overture Center for the Arts in Madison. The choir will be accompanied by Lawrence conservatory students on piano and percussion, with guest student instrumentalists from the Lawrence Academy of Music and Fox Valley Youth Symphony. Performances at the ACDA conference are open to the public with a $5 charge.

“It is a tremendous honor to be selected to perform for this convention,” said Bruno. “We are thrilled to represent the Lawrence community as well as the Fox Valley. Our conference program represents what we do well: a broad range of music for women’s choirs, in a variety of languages, from a wide range of historical periods and countries.”

The choir will sing a premiere arrangement from Monteverdi’s opera “L’Orfeo,” standard repertoire including “Salut, Printemps!” by Claude Debussy and “Nigra Sum” by Pablo Casals and close with an exciting dance-like composition from Peru.

Bel Canto offers a sneak preview of its conference program in a performance tonight (Feb. 7) in a “send-off” concert at 7:30 pm in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel. Admission is free, with free-will donations accepted to help cover convention costs.

The girl choir was selected for the ACDA conference based upon three years’ worth of recordings that passed two rigorous blind audition processes.

About Lawrence University

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

Lawrence Trustee Nominated by President Obama to Department of Justice Post

A member of the Lawrence University Board of Trustees is among several individuals President Barack Obama has announced as nominees to key administration posts.

Bill Baer '72

Bill Baer, a member of Lawrence’s Board of Trustees since 2001, has been nominated for Assistant Attorney General for the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice.

A 1972 Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Lawrence, Baer is the chair of the Antitrust Practice Group at Arnold & Porter LLP in Washington, D.C. He joined the firm in 1980 and was named a partner in 1983.

In his practice, Baer represents a broad range of companies in U.S. and international cartel investigations, mergers and acquisition reviews and in antitrust litigation.  He began his legal career in 1975 as a trial attorney for the Bureau of Consumer Protection at the Federal Trade Commission and later spent four years (1995-1999) as the FTC’s director for the Bureau of Competition.

After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in government from Lawrence, Baer earned a law degree from Stanford Law School.

About Lawrence University

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

Lawrence University President Jill Beck to Retire in June 2013

Lawrence University President Jill Beck announced Thursday (2/2) that she plans to retire in June 2013 after nine years as Lawrence’s president.

Beck, the first woman president in Lawrence’s history, became the college’s 15th president in July 2004.

Lawrence University President Jill Beck

“I think much has been accomplished over the past eight years,” said Beck. “Certainly I see a campus physically transformed, a faculty that has grown in number and a student body that is more diverse. There have been enhancements to the curriculum including Senior Experience, dance studies and the expansion of the film studies program with a focus on film production. There are greatly increased opportunities for student internships and research experiences to support our students’ transition from Lawrence into their future lives.”

Terry Franke, chair of the Board of Trustees, said finding President Beck’s successor would be a significant challenge.

“President Beck has helped Lawrence achieve a position of great strength,” said Franke. “She was a stellar fund raiser, leading the recently completed More Light! campaign to great success despite a troubled economy—exceeding the $150 million goal by more than $10 million. During her tenure Lawrence made significant investments in the physical plant in Appleton and in Door County, including the construction of the Warch Campus Center, significant renovations of the Memorial Chapel, Memorial Hall, the Wellness Center and residence halls; plus an expansion of the Björklunden lodge and the addition of a wind turbine on the northern campus. She led these initiatives without incurring any debt. In addition, she championed new academic initiatives such as the Lawrence Fellows program and LU-R1, which provides prestigious off-campus research opportunities for undergraduate science majors. Lawrence also has an expanded Career Center, is greener and boasts an enhanced wellness program. There is no doubt that Lawrence is well positioned for the future thanks to President Beck’s leadership.”

Franke credited Beck for timing her retirement in a manner that provides the Board of Trustees with a generous timeframe to plan and execute the search for Lawrence’s 16th president. He added that Trustee Dale Schuh, the chair, CEO, and president of Sentry Insurance and a Lawrence alumnus, would lead the presidential search committee.

“The board has already started the lengthy process to select a new leader and is looking forward to this important work,” said Franke. “Our goal is to make the transition as smooth as possible.”

Beck said the next 17 months would be busy ones as she focuses on several priorities aimed at maintaining Lawrence’s strong momentum.

“I will work with the economics faculty and their interdisciplinary colleagues on their initiative in Innovation and Entrepreneurship,” Beck said. “In addition I will direct energies toward the completion of the renovation of the former Downer Commons as a center for film studies and as the new home of Admissions, Career Services, and Alumni and Constituency Engagement. Certainly other priorities will come to the forefront this year and next, as I work with Director of Athletics Mike Szkodzinski and other members of the high-achieving Lawrence community.”

A native of Worcester, Massachusetts, Beck received a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Clark University, a master’s degree in history from McGill University and a Ph.D. in theatre from the City University of New York.

In 2009, Forbes.com called Beck a “barrier breaker,” one of 15 female college presidents on Forbes’ list of America’s 50 Best Colleges.

An interactive phonecast with President Beck and Lawrence Board of Trustees Chair Terry Franke will be held on Thursday, March 1 at noon. Details for participating will be forthcoming.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

Noted Primatologist Frans de Waal Examines Primate-Human Connections in Lawrence University Convocation

One of the world’s pre-eminent primatologists discusses his ground-breaking discoveries on the connections between primate and human behavior, from aggression to morality and culture, in a Lawrence University convocation.

Primatologist Frans de Waal

Frans de Waal, C. H. Candler Professor in the psychology department at Emory University, presents “Morality Before Religion: Empathy, Fairness and Prosocial Primates,” Thursday, Feb. 2 at 11:10 a.m. in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel.  de Waal also will conduct a question-and-answer session at 1:30 p.m. in the Warch Campus Center cinema.  Both events are free and open to the public.

Born in the Netherlands, de Waal began observing primate behavior at the Arnhem Zoo while a student at the University of Utrecht. His observations of a colony of 25 chimpanzees over a six-year period provided the basis for his 2005 book “Our Inner Ape.”

de Waal, who directs the Living Links Center at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center in Atlanta, the oldest and largest primate research institute in the nation, is credited with introducing the term “Machiavellian” to the vocabulary of primatologists. In his first book, “Chimpanzee Politics,” he compared the schmoozing and scheming of chimpanzees involved in power struggles with that of human politicians. In 1994, then-Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich put “Chimpanzee Politics” on the recommended reading list for all freshmen Congressmen.

His research led to the discovery of reconciliation among primates and the founding of the field of animal conflict resolution. In 2007, Time Magazine named him one of the “100 World’s Most Influential People Today.”

de Waal came to the United States in 1981 and spent the first 10 years of his American career with the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center in Madison. He is the author of 13 books on primate behavior, among them 2009’s “The Age of Empathy: Nature’s Lessons for a Kinder Society,” “Primates and Philosophers: How Morality Evolved,” “Peacemaking Among Primates” and 1998’s “Bonobo: The Forgotten Ape,” the first book to combine and compare data from captivity and the field.

His research has earned him election to both the National Academy of Sciences and the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences.

About Lawrence University

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

Tim Troy’s “The Life of Me” Gets Reading at Minneapolis Theatre

The latest playwriting project of Tim Troy, professor of theatre arts at Lawrence University, “The Life of Me,” will be performed Monday, Dec. 19 at the Playwrights Center in Minneapolis, Minn., as part of the company’s Members Stage Reading series.  The reading, at 6:30 p.m., is free and open to the public.

Professor of Theatre Arts Tim Troy

The reading, which explores many of the cultural and political conflicts that marked the period from 2003-05, features Katie Hawkinson ’09 in the role of Julie and veteran Milwaukee area actor Jacque Troy in the lead role of Kate, along with some of the Twin Cities best actors. An earlier version of the play was presented at Lawrence in the spring of 2006.

A parent’s capricious demand to inflate her son’s grade threatens Kate’s career. Surrounded by eclectic siblings who’ve conspired to reconcile an on-going family crisis, Kate desperately seeks renewed stability in her personal and professional relationships. She turns to art, literature and religion to lead her past doubt, learning that even a middle school teacher is vulnerable to those who will use faith as a weapon.

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

Earthquake Relief Funds Heading to Haiti for Music School Reconstruction

Almost two years after a devastating earthquake leveled much of the island nation of Haiti, Lawrence University’s campaign to help rebuild the Holy Trinity Music School in Port-au-Prince is taking shape.

The school, a long-time destination for Lawrence student and faculty volunteers, was destroyed by the January 12, 2010 earthquake that killed more than 200,000 Haitians. Nine days later, Lawrence hosted the “Concert for Haiti” which was recorded by Fox-11 WLUK and rebroadcast several times across Northeast Wisconsin.

The concert raised $32,000 through donations from the community and a recent gift from the Episcopal Diocese of Fond du Lac pushed the overall total to more than $40,000. The funds are now being sent to Haiti to begin reconstruction efforts.

Tom Clowes '01 is one of numerous alumni who have traveled to Haiti to work with young music students there.

“Weeks after the earthquake, musicians from Holy Trinity began performing for displaced people living in makeshift tent cities. With this donation the music school will build a temporary rehearsal structure enabling work to go on even in inclement weather,” said Lawrence Professor of Cello Janet Anthony, who has traveled to Haiti annually to teach music. “Plans have been drawn up to rebuild the entire cathedral complex (cathedral, convent, elementary, trade and music schools, art museum, concert hall, administrative offices, guest house) but, even with the most optimistic estimates, the completion date is several years off. This donation marks the first large step in the process of rebuilding and is hugely important. The generosity of our local community is astounding, moving and extremely gratifying.”

The funds raised, with generous support from Fox-11 WLUK, the Episcopal Diocese of Fond du Lac, the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region, the American Red Cross and the Northeast Wisconsin community, are being used to build a temporary shelter in downtown Port-au-Prince that will house two rehearsal halls, a studio and an instrument depot, as well as office space at the school’s annex in nearby Petionville.

“This was a wonderful example of our community pulling together to collaborate for an important cause,” said Lawrence President Jill Beck. “Lawrence could not have done this alone. We are so grateful to our many community partners, especially to the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region for stewarding the donated funds and to the Episcopal Diocese of Fond du Lac for raising additional funds and coordinating with the diocese in Haiti to ensure the money is safely transferred to the school.”

Since 1996, Lawrence students and faculty have traveled to Haiti to teach at various music programs. The Holy Trinity Music School began in 1963 and slowly became one of the only institutions in Haiti to integrate children from all economic levels. At the time of the earthquake, more than 1,200 students attended the school with its five orchestras, three bands and the renowned Petits Chanteurs. Over the years, the music school has gained international acclaim, touring the United States several times.

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

 

Saxophonist Phillip Dobernig ’13 Earns Second Place Honors in Music Competition

Lawrence University junior Phillip Dobernig earned second-place honors Nov. 26 in the Civic Music Association of Milwaukee Collegiate Music Competition, which was conducted at the Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the Arts in Brookfield.

Saxophonist Phillip Dobernig '13

A saxophone performance and music education major from Mukwonago, Dobernig was one of six musicians selected as finalists for the competition. He received a $1,500 scholarship for his performance, which included the pieces “Brilliance” by Ida Gotkovsky and “Tableaux de Provence” by Paule Maurice.  He is a student of Professor of Music Steven Jordheim.

Dobernig is a member of the Lawrence University saxophone quartet that won the 2011 Neale-Silva Young Artists competition sponsored by Wisconsin Public Radio and the 2010 Lawrence Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition.

The Civic Music Association of Milwaukee Collegiate Music Competition is open to continuing college students — instrumentalists and vocalists — who either graduated from a Milwaukee area high school or who currently attend a Milwaukee area college.

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

 

Lawrence Anthropologist Elected Fellow of Prestigious Science Organization

Lawrence University Professor of Anthropology Peter Peregrine has been elected a Fellow of the prestigious American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Election as an AAAS Fellow recognizes “meritorious efforts to advance science or its applications” and is an honor bestowed on AAAS members by their peers.  Peregrine was cited for his “research and theoretical contributions to American and Old World archaeology.”

Peregrine is just the second Lawrence anthropologist elected an AAAS Fellow, joining professor emeritus Ron Mason, who taught at Lawrence from 1961-95.

Peter Peregrine

“This is an amazing honor. I see it as the second highest honor an anthropologist can receive, right behind election to the National Academy of Sciences,” said Peregrine. The people who elected me are the most respected scholars in my discipline and the fact they think enough of my work to have me join them as a Fellow is both humbling and inspiring.”

The AAAS has approximately 125,000 individual members and only about 500 are elected Fellows each year.

“We are pleased that Professor Peregrine has been recognized with this honor,” said Provost David Burrows. “He is a creative, intelligent scholar, a fine teacher and a great contributor to the science of anthropology.”

An archaeologist, Peregrine joined the Lawrence faculty in 1995 after spending five years in the anthropology department of Juniata College in Pennsylvania.

Specializing in the evolution of complex societies, Peregrine’s scholarship interests include how ancient people first came to live together in large communities with powerful political leaders and how people from different cultures and speaking different languages interact and sometimes merge.

He is the author of the book “Archaeology of the Mississippian Culture:  A Research Guide” and co-edited the book “Ancient Human Migrations.”

He earned his bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees from Purdue University.

Founded in 1848, the AAAS is an international organization dedicated to advancing science around the world and serves more than 260 affiliated societies and academies of science and 10 million individuals. Its flagship publication, Science, has the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general science journal in the world.

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

$5 Million Gift Helps Launch Lawrence Film Studies Center

A game-changer for Lawrence University.

President Jill Beck announced a $5 million gift from Lawrence graduates Tom and Julie Hurvis that will support the establishment of The Hurvis Center for Interdisciplinary Film Studies, a facility dedicated to the integration of film production into the Lawrence curriculum.

The $5 million gift from the Hurvis Charitable Foundation was a part of Lawrence’s recently concluded “More Light!” campaign that raised more than $160 million.

Julie '61 and Tom Hurvis '60

The opening of the Hurvis Center will expand the scope of Lawrence’s current film curriculum, physically and intellectually.  The program currently includes interdisciplinary courses on film theory, history and analysis. The gift will create a fully functional film production studio supporting students’ creation of film and video for artistic and scholarly expression.

Beginning with its signature course, Freshman Studies, Lawrence provides a rigorous education in the traditional forms of literacy — cogent writing and oral dialogue. The enhanced film program will complement those traditions by engaging students in a third form of literacy essential for the 21st century: the visual literacy of film and video.

“Students already learn to ‘read’ film through our existing film theory and history curriculum,” said Beck. “The expanded program made possible by Tom and Julie Hurvis will enable students to learn to ‘write’ as well, producing original documentaries and creative films to express ideas, to raise awareness about issues of concern, and to share research with scholarly and community audiences.

“We are fortunate that an imaginative interdisciplinary approach to film studies has evolved and grown at Lawrence over the past many years,” Beck added. “The Hurvis gift recognizes that fact and generously provides us with the opportunity to add film production to our students’ education and integrate production into our existing program.”

Tom Hurvis, a 1960 Lawrence graduate and chairman and CEO of Old World Industries in Chicago, sees the program as a “game-changer for Lawrence.”

“It really puts the college into a different arena,” said Hurvis. “Here’s an innovation that is something new and it definitely fits with Lawrence. What else could potentially bring so many different members of the faculty together?”

Catherine Tatge '72

Award-winning filmmaker Catherine Tatge, a 1972 Lawrence graduate, will serve as a consultant to help get the program launched, offering workshops, assisting students and faculty with specific projects, and consulting with film studies faculty on how the Hurvis gift can best be put to use in curricular development.

“Catherine has expressed enthusiasm for the existing film studies program and is eager to work with faculty on an enhanced program that reflects Lawrence’s distinctiveness,” said Beck.

With more than 25 years of filmmaking experience, Tatge brings a unique vision for the development of a program that will be integrated through diverse areas of the Lawrence curriculum.

“I’m very excited about this new program,” said Tatge, whose latest documentary film, “John Muir in the New World,” premiered on PBS’ “American Masters” series earlier this year. “As a Lawrence graduate, I know the culture of this institution. Developing this program is really going to be a process, working with the faculty and with students to help build something that is uniquely tailored to Lawrence.”

2010 Lawrence graduate Garth Neustadter composed the score for the John Muir film and won an Emmy Award in the original music composition category.

The Hurvises are looking forward to watching the evolution of a distinctive film program rooted in Lawrence’s liberal arts tradition.

“This project is open-ended,” said Julie Hurvis, who graduated from Lawrence in 1961 with a degree in studio art. “We’re excited about it becoming a reality, as people are hired and begin working on the program.”

Filmmaking at Lawrence will promote cross fertilization throughout the campus, drawing upon resources from music performance, composition and arranging, art, dance, theatre, and creative writing. It aspires to engage many academic departments by making film another way for students and faculty to disseminate disciplinary research and ideas.

“Lawrence already has very good creative synergy with the conservatory of music, with art, the theatre department and other creative areas, so the film program will be a beautiful tie-in to all of those different creative juices,” said Tom Hurvis.

“I see bringing different parts of the university together to work on different aspects of the media and cinema process so that students will leave Lawrence being media-savvy and capable of effectively communicating their ideas,” added Tatge.

The Hurvis Center will be located in the renovated lower level of the former Jason Downer Commons. It will provide more than 5,500 square feet of new academic programming space, including a 2,000-square-foot central performance and screening venue for use by film studies and other disciplines, including theatre, dance and music. The large and flexible space will promote collaboration and cross fertilization among multiple disciplines.

The gift also will support the addition of a new faculty position to develop new offerings on filmmaking and a technical position to provide expertise in maintaining equipment and instruction on how to use it.

“Lawrence is truly fortunate to have philanthropists like Tom and Julie Hurvis among its alumni,” said Beck.  “They have a wonderful vision for Lawrence as one of the very best liberal arts institutions in the nation and have made landmark investments in the college to help it achieve that stature.”

Tom and Julie Hurvis’ interests in film include serving as producers of the 2009 award-winning documentary film “The Providence Effect.”  Winner of two film festival “Best Documentary” awards, the film chronicles the efforts of Paul Adams to transform Providence St. Mel, an all-black parochial school on Chicago’s notorious drug-ridden, gang-ruled West Side into a first-rank college preparatory school for its African-American student body.

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.

Tierney Sutton Band, John and Gerald Clayton Headline 31st Annual Jazz Celebration Weekend

The multi-Grammy Award nominated Tierney Sutton Band makes its Lawrence University debut Friday, Nov. 4 when it opens the college’s 31st annual Jazz Celebration Weekend. Father-son duo John and Gerald Clayton share the stage with the Lawrence University Jazz Ensemble and Studio Orchestra in the weekend’s finale Saturday, Nov. 5. Both concerts begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel.

Tickets, at $22-20 for adults, $19-17 for seniors and $17-15 for students, are available through the Lawrence Box Office in the Music-Drama Center, 920-832-6749.

Singer Tierney Sutton

Led by Tierney Sutton, who grew up in Milwaukee and earned a degree in Russian language and literature at Wesleyan University, the five-member band celebrated both the recent release of its ninth album, “American Road,” as well as its third Grammy nomination for “Best Vocal Jazz Album.”

“Tierney is a terrific choice as one of our headliners,” said Fred Sturm, Jazz Celebration Weekend founder and Lawrence’s director of jazz studies and improvisational music. “She is a Wisconsin native, a marvelous singer and an experienced educator who taught jazz studies at the University of Southern California and now directs the vocal department at the Los Angeles Music Academy. She undoubtedly will inspire the student musicians attending our festival.”

During its nearly two-decade long incorporated partnership, the band — Sutton on vocals, pianist Christian Jacob, bassists Trey Henry and Kevin Axt and drummer Ray Brinker — have garnered critical praise for their performances and recordings throughout the world with such musical luminaries as Ray Charles and Placido Domingo.

In addition to three Grammy nominations, Sutton was recognized with JazzWeek’s Vocalist of the Year Award in 2005 and the Los Angeles Jazz Society’s Jazz Vocalist Award the following year.  The 2002 disc “Something Cool” reached no.1 on the jazz charts.

Legendary composer/arranger/conductor and virtuoso bassist John Clayton, alongside his son, acclaimed pianist Gerald Clayton, close the weekend. The Claytons were a mid-summer Jazz Celebration Weekend replacement for Lyle Mays, who had to cancel his appearance for personal reasons.

Bassist John Clayton

“Folks my age typically don’t admit to having heroes, but John Clayton is surely one of mine,” said Sturm. “When I invited him to appear at Jazz Weekend, he asked ‘Can I bring my son Gerald?’ I was thrilled, for the word has been out about this 27-year-old jazz prodigy for several years. Seeing and hearing this remarkable father-son duo will be an unforgettable musical experience for Jazz Weekend participants and audience members.”

A Grammy Award-winning composer, John Clayton’s career is littered with an impressive   array of accomplishments. Comfortable in both classical and jazz styles, he served as bassist with the Count Basie Orchestra and the Amsterdam Philharmonic Orchestra and as artistic director of Jazz for the L.A. Philharmonic and the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra. As a music arranger, he has worked with Nancy Wilson and Quincy Jones, Whitney Houston and Queen Latifah, among others.

“Quite simply, John can do it all,” said Sturm.

Born in the Netherlands but raised in Los Angeles, Gerald Clayton was named one of the top “up-and-coming pianists to watch” in a 2008 Downbeat Readers Poll. Influenced by Oscar Peterson, Monty Alexander and Benny Green, Gerald Clayton styles his music on the notion “tradition and innovation can peacefully coexist.”

Pianist Gerald Clayton Photo by Emra Islek

He began playing the piano at the age of six and has since performed for audiences across the globe while collaborating with such notable artists as Lewis Nash, Terrell Stafford and Clark Terry. In addition to award-winning piano skills that garnered a Grammy nomination in 2009 for his work on Cole Porter’s “All of You” in the Best Improvised Jazz Solo category, Gerald Clayton’s composition “Battle Circle” was a 2010 Grammy nomination for “Best Instrumental Jazz Composition.” Most recently, the Gerald Clayton Trio released its second album, “Bond: The Paris Sessions,” and made its debut at the North Sea Jazz Festival in the Netherlands.

As part of the Saturday concert, the Lawrence Studio Orchestra and the Jazz Ensemble will perform original works written and conducted by John Clayton and accompanied by Gerald Clayton. The Jazz Ensemble also will perform a set of Clayton works scored for the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra, one of the world’s premier big bands.

In addition to the two evening concerts, Lawrence will host more than 30 university, high school and middle school ensembles at part of  the 2011 Jazz Celebration Weekend. On Saturday, these ensembles will participate in daytime performances, educational clinics, and master classes with some of the finest jazz educators from across the country. All daytime  Saturday events are free and open to the public.

Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a world-class conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. Ranked among America’s best colleges, it was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,445 students from 44 states and 35 countries.