The Web Turns 30

By Jill Thomas, Director of Technical Services

Do you know the name Tim Berners-Lee? Well, the idea that he came up with 30 years ago on March 12 touches us almost every minute of every day – he invented the internet!

Thirty years ago, Tim Berners-Lee was working at CERN (European Council for Nuclear Research/Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire) and thought it would be great if he could link and access information across computers. By November 1990, his idea had become, “[a] web of information nodes in which the user can browse at will” as he stated in his formal proposal written with his CERN colleague, Robert Cailliau, titled World Wide Web: Proposal for a Hyper Text Project. By Christmas of 1990, Berners-Lee and Cailliau had implemented key components such as html, http, and URL, and created the first Web server, browser, and editor.

On April 30, 1990, CERN released the first version of the WWW software into the public domain and made it freely available to anyone to use and improve. Today, half of the world’s population is online and there are close to 2 billion websites. Openness has always been a part of CERN’s culture. Today CERN continues to promote open sharing of software, technology, publications and data through initiatives such as open source software, open hardware, open access publishing, and CERN’s Open Data Portal.

Today take a moment to thank Sir Tim Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau for their imagination and their drive to communicate just a little easier with their colleagues.

Student Research in the Library: Sophie Penniman

Sophie is an English and history double major with a creative writing minor from Austin, Texas. She will graduate in June.

After graduation, Sophie will stay in Appleton briefly, applying for graduate school and baking delicious treats at Seth’s Coffee in Little Chute. She also plans to hike the 500-mile Colorado Trail in the Rocky Mountains!

Sophie will pursue her graduate degree in Library and Information Science with a concentration in archives management. She’s been a student worker for several years in the Mudd, and we know that she’s going to make a fantastic librarian and/or archivist!

Read on to learn more about the research she’s been undertaking with the help of the library!

Student researcher Sophie Penniman

Sophie, tell us about your research.

I’m working on my senior capstone for history! I’m writing about the travel diary of Betty May Hale, an American 13-year-old girl who spent six months traveling in Europe with her family in 1937.

What library materials and resources have been the most useful to you in pursuing this research?

Honestly, my office has been a massive help!! Especially at a small, residential school like Lawrence, it’s sometimes hard to find a space entirely to yourself that’s just dedicated to academic work. My office is a place free from distractions where I can just go and work, which has been really useful to me. Also, last term I carried all the books for my research around with me in a tote bag, so it’s great to have somewhere for them to live in the library.

Other than that, the archives were a great resource, especially in the early stages of my project.

” There are so many resources available for you at the Mudd, you just have to take advantage of them! “

~Sophie Penniman

What are you hoping to learn or gain from this research?

I’m studying how Betty May’s travel experiences affected how she thought about herself as an American. I’m also interested in how the travel agency the family used (a company called Thomas Cook) influenced the way they interacted with Europe and the European people.

Why do you think this research is important?

The mid-late 1930’s are a really interesting time for a lot of reasons—America was just climbing out of the Great Depression, World War II was right around the corner, and the United States was in the middle of this big cultural shift from relative isolationism/neutrality to globalism. There’s a lot written about this period on a national level, but there’s not as much about individual people, especially normal Americans like Betty May.

How did you become interested in this line of research?

I studied abroad in London my sophomore year and had an amazing time, so I wanted to do a project that dealt with study or travel abroad to Europe. Initially I was going to compare the experiences of a few different young women traveling before World War II, and I came across Betty May’s diary in a library database called American Women’s Letters and Diaries. There was so much more material in Betty May’s diary than in any of my other sources, and eventually I just narrowed my focus to her.

” Librarian Gretchen Revie has been really involved with helping my capstone class access research and citation materials.”

~Sophie Penniman, discussing all of the ways the Mudd Library has supported her research

Sophie, thank you for taking the time to talk to us about your work! It’s been an honor and a joy to support you and we wish you all the best.

Academic Citation Workshop!

Want to learn answers to important questions like,

  • why do we cite?
  • what’s the difference between MLA and APA?
  • when do I use footnotes?
  • what should be cited (and what shouldn’t be)?

If so, come to the Academic Citation Workshop, co-hosted by your friends from the Mudd Library and the Center for Academic Success. Gretchen Revie, Julie Haurykiewicz, and Nicole Crashell will guide you through the art and science of academic citations.

The workshop will take on the first floor of the Mudd Library at 4:30 on Tuesday, February 12th. Hope to see you there!

Collaborative Science Fiction Display in the Mudd

This term the Mudd Library has partnered with professors from around campus to create a display celebrating science fiction!

The display is meant to highlight several winter term science fiction courses currently underway.

Chloe Armstrong is teaching Science Fiction and Philosophy, Amy Ongiri is leading a class called Queering Science Fiction Film, and Jason Brozek is heading up a weekend retreat to Bjorklunden to study War and Science Fiction.

Below we’ve shared science fiction recommendations from professors across disciplines. Our library display, located on the first floor, includes many of these recommendations, and more!

Jason Brozek from the Government Department recommends:

Starship Troopers (1997) – This is right up there with Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove as one of the best military satires of all time.

Battlestar Galactica (the rebooted series, 2004-2009) – One of the most powerful TV representations of issues like dehumanization, torture, terrorism, and civil-military relations.

The Forever War by Joe Halderman (1974) – The plot is about humanity traveling light-years to fight an interstellar enemy, but this book is really about how the experience of war fundamentally changes the people who fight it.

Amy Ongiri from Film Studies recommends:

Bloodchild and Other Stories by Octavia Butler

Octavia’s Broodedited by Walidah Imarisha

Peddle Zombies by Elly Blue

Our Reference and Learning Technologies Librarian Angela Vanden Elzen recommends:

Star Trek

Dr. Who

Cinder by Marissa Meyer

Monica Rico from the History Department recommends:

Doomsday Book by Connie Willis. It explores the historical and philosophical issues raised by time travel in a sophisticated way, but it’s also a book that, at its heart, is about friendship, compassion, and loyalty.

Martyn Smith from Religious Studies recommends:

Elon Musk, Elon Musk, SpaceX, Tesla, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future

Claire Kervin from Environmental Studies recommends:

Maddaddam Trilogy by Margaret Atwood

Victoria Kononova from the Russian Department recommends:

The Roadside Picnic by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky 

Metro 2033 by Dmitry Glukhovsky

Chloe Armstrong from the Philosophy Department recommends:

“Imposter Syndrome” by Mari Kurisato, in Love Beyond Body, Space and Time, an Indigenous LGBT Sci-fi Anthology, edited by Hope Nicholson

Story of Your Life by Ted Chiang

Annihilation by Jeff Vandermeer

Please come in and visit our display if you are on campus!

We hope you will consider reading or watching some science fiction, and that you live long and prosper, too!

In the Mudd Gallery: XChange

Text on image reads: XChange: An Institutional Exchange Between Carthage College and Lawrence UniversityWe are thrilled to be hosting the exhibit, XChange: An Institutional Exchange Between Carthage College and Lawrence University, in the Mudd Gallery. In a beautiful display of intercollegiate collaboration, the artwork on exhibit in the Mudd Gallery was created by Carthage College art students. As described by our friends at Carthage College, this exhibition is one half of a student art exchange- with the other half being Lawrence University student work on exhibit in the H.F. Johnson Gallery of Art on the Carthage campus.

The exhibit will remain on display in the Mudd Gallery on the third floor of the library from January 9th through January 31, 2018.

The Mudd is Everything!

The Mudd Library isn’t just a place to study, or to search for and gather materials.

Libraries offer so much more, and the Mudd is no different!

  • Print and Copy Shop

Printing projects and papers and presentations, oh my!

We have everything you need to put the finishing touches on your papers and projects. Make copies, print your paper, or use the scanner. We have a universal phone charging station if you’re running low. We have staplers, tape, paper clips, rulers, and all kinds of other accoutrements to help you polish your assignments and hand them in with pride.

  • Academic Support Station

Do you need another primary or secondary source to support your argument? Looking for an open-source photo to add to your slides or for the proper citation for your paper? The reference librarians are here to help you find what you need and engage in the best and most thorough research possible. We aim to help you feel confident and supported as a student researcher.

  • Information Kiosk

Curious about what’s happening on campus? Looking to find local thrift stores, coffee shops, or parks? Not sure when that concert starts tonight? Stop by, we’ll  help you find out!

  • Social Hot Spot

All of your friends are here! Hang out on the first or second floor to discuss, debate, and collaborate. Chat, vent, laugh, share. Sometimes just sitting next to someone who is working as hard as you are can be the most valuable resource. Snap some pics or make a vid! Then get back to that group project! Pull up a whiteboard and teach each other what you’ve learned. Ask someone out on a study date. The options are endless.

Learning, together.

  • Safe, quiet, peaceful haven

The third and fourth floors are meant for quiet study. They also make a great place to read, reflect, daydream, or nap. Write that paper! No one will barge in just as you get in your groove. Or, if you’ve been in your groove and need a little break, stop down to the first floor to nurture yourself with a cup of tea. Text your mom and then get back at it. The library is for everyone, and everyone is welcome here and treated with respect and dignity!

Getting productive while enjoying the peace and of the fourth floor.

What do you need?

Academic support?

A quiet place to get some work done?

A place to belong?

We’re here for you!

How to use the Library when it’s Closed

Get ready for the upcoming annual library winter break closure! In addition to visiting with family and friends and relaxing, we know many will be using this time to prepare for winter term. Here are some ways the library can help, even when the building is closed:

  • Streaming media databases: Find documentaries, instructional videos, movies, news clips, operas, theatre performances, and much more from our varied collection of streaming video resources. Our streaming audio resources include a wide variety of music, theatre audio, and more. Many of these resources include permalinks to individual titles and the ability to make clips to use in courses, and most can be accessed off campus with a proxy login.
  • OneSearch and Article databases: Find full text articles by searching in OneSearch and in many of our databases.
  • ArtStor Image Database: Collect images for your courses and projects in ArtStor.
  • Electronic books: Need a book? Access an eBook from our eBook databases- or from our friends at the Appleton Public Library (or your local public library).
  • Course reserve forms: We have PDF forms of our course reserve cards available that you can fill out at home and print out (or save as and print out later). Find an article in one of our databases? Use this form to simply enter some information, and we’ll add your reading and fill out the card.
  • RefWorks citation manager: Don’t have access to a printer? Collect and organize resources in RefWorks that you can easily locate once we’re open again.

We’ll be open again on January 2nd, from 8 am to 4:30 pm, then resuming regular school year hours on January 3rd. We look forward to seeing everyone back on campus and in the library!

Winter Break Hours & Services

Exterior photo of the Mudd Library in winter with snow covering the ground, tree branches, and blue library sign.Now that fall term is wrapping up, it’s time to start thinking about special D-Term and winter break hours.

  • Tuesday, November 20th (the last day of final exams), 8 a.m. until 9 p.m.
  • 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, November 21
  • Closed Thursday, November 22 through Sunday, November 25th
  • Beginning Monday, November 26, we’ll be open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • Closed from Saturday, December 22 through Tuesday, January 1.
  • We’ll be open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, December 2.

Academic year library hours will resume on Thursday, January 3.

Your friends in the Mudd will be here to help you prepare for next term (we’re talking to you faculty, students, and staff) or to catch up on some books and movies.

Taking a D-Term class? Our reference librarians are on call from 8:30 am through 4:30 p.m. to support any D-Term reference needs. You’re also welcome to check out some movies, CDs, video games (and a Nintendo Wii system), board games, musical scores, and of course, books.

Off campus? Most of our databases can be access from off campus! You can continue to do research, or enjoy some great plays, operas, documentaries, and much more from our streaming media databases. Interlibrary loan articles may also be requested over breaks, even if you’re off campus.

As always, we’re here to help- so if there are any ways your friends in the Mudd Library can help you, just ask!

New York Times Election Resources

As you may know, the Mudd Library and Warch Campus Center provide a free New York Times subscription to all Lawrence University students, faculty, and staff.

Just sign up on campus at nytimes.com/passes with your Lawrence email address (your account may be accessed off-campus once it’s been created). The subscription provides access to the electronic version from a browser and through NYTimes mobile applications.

Below is a list of features that may be especially helpful for staying informed for the November 6th midterm elections (compiled and annotated by The New York Times staff):

    • The Upshot – News, analysis and graphics about politics, policy and everyday life. Subscribe to the newsletter as well.
    • Elections – News about elections, including commentary and archival articles published in The New York Times.
    • The ArgumentNew York Times Opinion columnists explain an argument from each side of the political spectrum, so you can decide where you stand and how to persuade the opposition. Check out the section and podcast.
    • The Daily podcast – This is how the news should sound. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week. Tune in along with five million monthly unique listeners.
    • Race/Related – A weekly newsletter focused on race, identity and culture.

Prefer a different news resource? The Mudd Library subscribes to a wide variety of newspapers in both paper and electronic formats!

Refugee Symposium Resources in the Library

Sign with a title that reads Lawrence University is hosting the symposium, Seeking Refuge: Local and Global Perspectives, from November 4 through November 6, 2018. This symposium is meant to bring awareness of the global issue of the refugee crisis by hosting discussions with community featuring guests with a wide range of backgrounds in helping refugees and who are refugees themselves. The schedule for the symposium can be viewed on the Refugee Symposium webpage.

The library is providing a variety of resources to support this symposium:

Seeking Refuge Research & Materials Guide
This guide contains links to many resources available in the library and online for those who would like to continue their enrichment about the topic of refugees. In addition to books, movies, and journals, the guide also contains links to our music databases to a selection of songs played at the refugee symposium concert.

Wood and glass display case containing images of refugees and resources.Display Exhibit:
The display contains powerful photographs and news headlines that illustrate the refugee plight, facts about refugees around the world, and tips for finding related resources in the library catalog and OneSearch.

Book Display:
All along the top of the newspaper and popular magazine shelf, we’ve placed a selection of library materials about the refugee experience. No need to search or go upstairs to find materials, just grab some books you’d like to read from this display and sit down to read them, or check them out at the circulation desk.

Your friends in the Mudd Library are glad to be supporting a symposium on such an important topic and to help with continuing the discussion.