Author: Angela Vanden Elzen

The Web Turns 30

By Jill Thomas, Director of Technical Services

Do you know the name Tim Berners-Lee? Well, the idea that he came up with 30 years ago on March 12 touches us almost every minute of every day – he invented the internet!

Thirty years ago, Tim Berners-Lee was working at CERN (European Council for Nuclear Research/Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire) and thought it would be great if he could link and access information across computers. By November 1990, his idea had become, “[a] web of information nodes in which the user can browse at will” as he stated in his formal proposal written with his CERN colleague, Robert Cailliau, titled World Wide Web: Proposal for a Hyper Text Project. By Christmas of 1990, Berners-Lee and Cailliau had implemented key components such as html, http, and URL, and created the first Web server, browser, and editor.

On April 30, 1990, CERN released the first version of the WWW software into the public domain and made it freely available to anyone to use and improve. Today, half of the world’s population is online and there are close to 2 billion websites. Openness has always been a part of CERN’s culture. Today CERN continues to promote open sharing of software, technology, publications and data through initiatives such as open source software, open hardware, open access publishing, and CERN’s Open Data Portal.

Today take a moment to thank Sir Tim Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau for their imagination and their drive to communicate just a little easier with their colleagues.

Academic Citation Workshop!

Want to learn answers to important questions like,

  • why do we cite?
  • what’s the difference between MLA and APA?
  • when do I use footnotes?
  • what should be cited (and what shouldn’t be)?

If so, come to the Academic Citation Workshop, co-hosted by your friends from the Mudd Library and the Center for Academic Success. Gretchen Revie, Julie Haurykiewicz, and Nicole Crashell will guide you through the art and science of academic citations.

The workshop will take on the first floor of the Mudd Library at 4:30 on Tuesday, February 12th. Hope to see you there!

In the Mudd Gallery: XChange

Text on image reads: XChange: An Institutional Exchange Between Carthage College and Lawrence UniversityWe are thrilled to be hosting the exhibit, XChange: An Institutional Exchange Between Carthage College and Lawrence University, in the Mudd Gallery. In a beautiful display of intercollegiate collaboration, the artwork on exhibit in the Mudd Gallery was created by Carthage College art students. As described by our friends at Carthage College, this exhibition is one half of a student art exchange- with the other half being Lawrence University student work on exhibit in the H.F. Johnson Gallery of Art on the Carthage campus.

The exhibit will remain on display in the Mudd Gallery on the third floor of the library from January 9th through January 31, 2018.

How to use the Library when it’s Closed

Get ready for the upcoming annual library winter break closure! In addition to visiting with family and friends and relaxing, we know many will be using this time to prepare for winter term. Here are some ways the library can help, even when the building is closed:

  • Streaming media databases: Find documentaries, instructional videos, movies, news clips, operas, theatre performances, and much more from our varied collection of streaming video resources. Our streaming audio resources include a wide variety of music, theatre audio, and more. Many of these resources include permalinks to individual titles and the ability to make clips to use in courses, and most can be accessed off campus with a proxy login.
  • OneSearch and Article databases: Find full text articles by searching in OneSearch and in many of our databases.
  • ArtStor Image Database: Collect images for your courses and projects in ArtStor.
  • Electronic books: Need a book? Access an eBook from our eBook databases- or from our friends at the Appleton Public Library (or your local public library).
  • Course reserve forms: We have PDF forms of our course reserve cards available that you can fill out at home and print out (or save as and print out later). Find an article in one of our databases? Use this form to simply enter some information, and we’ll add your reading and fill out the card.
  • RefWorks citation manager: Don’t have access to a printer? Collect and organize resources in RefWorks that you can easily locate once we’re open again.

We’ll be open again on January 2nd, from 8 am to 4:30 pm, then resuming regular school year hours on January 3rd. We look forward to seeing everyone back on campus and in the library!

Winter Break Hours & Services

Exterior photo of the Mudd Library in winter with snow covering the ground, tree branches, and blue library sign.Now that fall term is wrapping up, it’s time to start thinking about special D-Term and winter break hours.

  • Tuesday, November 20th (the last day of final exams), 8 a.m. until 9 p.m.
  • 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, November 21
  • Closed Thursday, November 22 through Sunday, November 25th
  • Beginning Monday, November 26, we’ll be open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • Closed from Saturday, December 22 through Tuesday, January 1.
  • We’ll be open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, December 2.

Academic year library hours will resume on Thursday, January 3.

Your friends in the Mudd will be here to help you prepare for next term (we’re talking to you faculty, students, and staff) or to catch up on some books and movies.

Taking a D-Term class? Our reference librarians are on call from 8:30 am through 4:30 p.m. to support any D-Term reference needs. You’re also welcome to check out some movies, CDs, video games (and a Nintendo Wii system), board games, musical scores, and of course, books.

Off campus? Most of our databases can be access from off campus! You can continue to do research, or enjoy some great plays, operas, documentaries, and much more from our streaming media databases. Interlibrary loan articles may also be requested over breaks, even if you’re off campus.

As always, we’re here to help- so if there are any ways your friends in the Mudd Library can help you, just ask!

New York Times Election Resources

As you may know, the Mudd Library and Warch Campus Center provide a free New York Times subscription to all Lawrence University students, faculty, and staff.

Just sign up on campus at nytimes.com/passes with your Lawrence email address (your account may be accessed off-campus once it’s been created). The subscription provides access to the electronic version from a browser and through NYTimes mobile applications.

Below is a list of features that may be especially helpful for staying informed for the November 6th midterm elections (compiled and annotated by The New York Times staff):

    • The Upshot – News, analysis and graphics about politics, policy and everyday life. Subscribe to the newsletter as well.
    • Elections – News about elections, including commentary and archival articles published in The New York Times.
    • The ArgumentNew York Times Opinion columnists explain an argument from each side of the political spectrum, so you can decide where you stand and how to persuade the opposition. Check out the section and podcast.
    • The Daily podcast – This is how the news should sound. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week. Tune in along with five million monthly unique listeners.
    • Race/Related – A weekly newsletter focused on race, identity and culture.

Prefer a different news resource? The Mudd Library subscribes to a wide variety of newspapers in both paper and electronic formats!

Refugee Symposium Resources in the Library

Sign with a title that reads Lawrence University is hosting the symposium, Seeking Refuge: Local and Global Perspectives, from November 4 through November 6, 2018. This symposium is meant to bring awareness of the global issue of the refugee crisis by hosting discussions with community featuring guests with a wide range of backgrounds in helping refugees and who are refugees themselves. The schedule for the symposium can be viewed on the Refugee Symposium webpage.

The library is providing a variety of resources to support this symposium:

Seeking Refuge Research & Materials Guide
This guide contains links to many resources available in the library and online for those who would like to continue their enrichment about the topic of refugees. In addition to books, movies, and journals, the guide also contains links to our music databases to a selection of songs played at the refugee symposium concert.

Wood and glass display case containing images of refugees and resources.Display Exhibit:
The display contains powerful photographs and news headlines that illustrate the refugee plight, facts about refugees around the world, and tips for finding related resources in the library catalog and OneSearch.

Book Display:
All along the top of the newspaper and popular magazine shelf, we’ve placed a selection of library materials about the refugee experience. No need to search or go upstairs to find materials, just grab some books you’d like to read from this display and sit down to read them, or check them out at the circulation desk.

Your friends in the Mudd Library are glad to be supporting a symposium on such an important topic and to help with continuing the discussion.

In the Mudd Gallery: History of the Hysterical

The first Mudd Gallery show of the 2018-2019 school year is set up and ready to be viewed! The show, History of the Hysterical, is a grouping of works by Lawrence student Meryl Louise Carson.

The opening reception is on Friday, October 26th at 4:30 pm. Carson’s exhibit will be on display from October 23-29.

The Mudd Gallery is located on the third floor of the Mudd Library.

Alumni Librarians: Elizabeth Bast ’89

Image of Elizabeth BastEditor’s note: We invited Lawrence alumni who have gone into library work to share with us what they do and how they got there.  Here’s another in a series.

Envy. I admit it. That’s what I feel when I think about students in college and graduate school today considering entering the library field (including my son, a current student at Lawrence). Not to be too “back in my day” about it, but when I attended Lawrence in the late ‘80s I can positively state that being a librarian never entered my mind. Don’t get me wrong, I loved my local public library in West Bend, Wisconsin and was a frequent visitor to my school libraries and even the good old Mudd while a student at Lawrence, but it’s hard to describe to students today how much technology and culture have transformed libraries (and the role of the librarian).

Quiet. Sedate. Solitary. The libraries I used to know were filled with knowledge but were not particularly dynamic places. Going to the library (of any kind) meant entering a serious place where mostly silent, individual exploration took place. The stereotypical librarian was a “shusher” with glasses and a prim demeanor. She (typically) served in a gatekeeper role where orderly systems of classification ruled and being a patron had a definite “supplicant” feel. It was not a world I ever envisioned finding the most engaging, dynamic, and fulfilling career of my life. And yet…

If I could have majored in “Liberal Arts” at Lawrence I would have. I was interested in everything and took as long as I possibly could to pick a major, and even then chose one that spanned two disciplines (back then Lawrence had an Anthropology/Sociology department). Plus I threw in an Education minor and earned my teaching license in 7-12 Broad Fields Social Studies. Lawrence made it very difficult to leave the world of learning, so even though I was prepared to enter the classroom as a teacher, I decided to extend my studies into graduate school and entered the Masters in Sociology program at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where I completed the program with a thesis based on original research on the topic of urban education. After getting married and moving to New York City so my new husband could pursue graduate studies, I entered the world of publishing as an editorial assistant for an editor working on academic titles in the fields of Sociology and Philosophy, while I spent nights teaching GED and ESL classes at a non-profit community organization. Upon returning to Wisconsin three years later I took a job as an academic advisor with a program called Upward Bound, run out of the University of Wisconsin-Sheboygan campus and three years after that I became pregnant with my first child and found myself moving again so my husband could pursue his career. Whew.

Taking time off from paid employment to be a stay-at-home parent to my two children was definitely not time wasted (in fact I highly recommend it if money and circumstance allow), but it did create a sizable hole in my resume when I decided to return to the work world when my younger child started Kindergarten. I knew I wanted a career again, a profession that would be part of my identity and allow me to fulfill my potential. Traditional teaching was obviously an option, but I didn’t have the same passion for it that I did when I was younger. I considered other roles within the education field, such as counselor, or reading specialist, because I had really enjoyed the one-on-one relationships I built with students when I worked for Upward Bound, but I knew I needed to go back to school on some level to refresh my knowledge and credentials before anyone would hire me.

I turned to the website for the UW-Milwaukee Graduate School to see what programs were available that might allow me to combine taking courses in-person with an online component, because I still had young kids and driving 35 miles from my home in Racine, Wisconsin was not always possible. It is there, while perusing the various programs, that I first laid eyes on the School of Information Studies (SOIS). Have you ever had one of those moments where everything just came into focus? I was excited and surprised. Course titles like The Organization of Information, Information Access and Retrieval, Metadata, and Information Ethics intrigued me. What sold me was the ability to combine a Masters in Library and Information Science (MLIS) with the certification for a School Library Media Specialist license (K-12) by taking courses like Library Services for Children and Young Adults and Multicultural Children’s Literature. It felt like a great fit, so I enrolled in January of 2008 and never looked back.

How had this field escaped my attention all this time? Well, a little thing called the Internet took over the world in the time since I left Lawrence in 1989, and libraries and librarians have been leading the way as innovators and navigators of this brave new world. Now I work as a Library Media Specialist (sometimes referred to as Teacher Librarian) in a public middle school serving more than 800 students in a very culturally and economically diverse community. I am certainly proud of the collection of books I have selected and curated over the years but I am not the English-major book nerd that is often part of the librarian profile. I approach my profession as a Lawrence graduate, a liberal arts nerd who is fascinated by and knowledgeable about many different fields and topics. I collaborate with my social studies, math, science, art, music, and even gym teachers as much as I do my English faculty. The online world is a wonderful and terrifying place for kids and adults and a large part of my value to my school is my ability to make technology and digital information accessible, manageable, and meaningful. I collaborate, I troubleshoot, I teach, I counsel, I provide inspiration and sometimes refuge. Every day is a different schedule and a different challenge. I get to know and serve every student and teacher in my building. I also have chosen to participate in my profession by serving on task forces and committees for the American Library Association (ALA) and the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), which is just the cherry on top of my already awesome job because I get to know and work with amazing librarians from around the country. (I’m currently serving on the Odyssey Award 2019 committee which selects the best audiobook created for children each year).

So, yeah. Do I wish I had found this career earlier? Absolutely, but I also recognize that the school library of my childhood was nothing like the one I work in today, so I just have to be grateful that I’m able to spend the 2nd half of my working life in a job I truly love (and also a little envious of those who can embark on a vital career in libraries right out of college).

By Elizabeth Bast, Class of 1989

Welcome Week 2018 Events

Image of a map on display and Welcome Week, one of our favorite weeks of the year, is coming up soon! We’re hosting or taking part in all kinds of events to welcome new students along with families and friends to campus.

Below is a lineup of the major events! In addition to these, we’ll also be meeting with sports teams and Waseda students!

Tuesday, September 4th

Resources Fair, 11:30 am to 1 pm (Campus Center): Be sure to visit your soon-to-be friends from the Mudd Library at our table.

Parents, Family & Friends Library Drop-In, 1 pm to 3 pm: While new students are off doing activities, come to the library and make yourselves comfortable, wander around, grab a magazine or newspaper, relax in the Milwaukee-Downer Room, use our wireless, and sip some coffee or tea. Enjoy our library!

Thursday, September 6th

Welcome to the Mudd Open House, 9 am to 12 pm: Stop by the Mudd and meet the people who can help you succeed. Not only can you find out about the library (both online and offline), take a tour, and enjoy some food—you can build with Legos, make origami bookmarks, play on the Wii, and more! It’s both fun and educational—and you can’t beat that.

Friday, September 7th

Getting to know the library presentations and tours, beginning at 1:30. Get off to the best start by learning all about what the Mudd Library can do to help you succeed. Each session will last approximately 20 minutes. Come to as many as you’d like!

  • 1:30 pm, What’s the Mudd
  • 1:50 pm, Tour the Mudd
  • 2:00 pm Scores and CDs and Streaming, oh my!
  • 2:30 pm, What’s the Mudd?
  • 2:50 pm, Tour the Mudd
  • 3 pm Scores and CDs and Streaming, oh my!
  • 3:30 pm, What’s the Mudd?
  • 3:50 pm, Tour the Mudd
  • 4:00 pm, Scores and CDs and Streaming, oh my!

Read the whole schedule on the Welcome Week events page. Want to know more about the library, visit our welcome students page.

Welcome the Lawrence University, new students! We’re looking forward to meeting you!