Author: Angela Vanden Elzen

Spring Break & Spring Term in the Mudd- Updated

With the news of Lawrence University extending spring break and the campus moving to distance learning for spring term, you may be wondering what that means for the Mudd Library.

  • Spring break hours of Monday to Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm, closed Saturday and Sunday, will begin on Thursday, March 19 and go through Sunday, April 5
  • We will be closed over spring break, March 19 through April 5- but we will available to help remotely Monday through Friday 8-5.
  • We will hope to be open over spring term – though hours remain to be determined

Your friends in the Mudd will be here for you, even when you’re away from campus! Here are just some of the ways!

We know this is an anxious time for our fabulous students and our faculty and staff colleagues. Rest assured that we’ll do all we can to help everyone continue to be successful in these unusual circumstances.

Second Floor Renovation

We’re so excited to welcome our friends in the Center for Academic Success to the second floor of the Mudd Library! When the renovation is complete, they’ll be joining our other second floor buddies, Technology Services.

Here’s a timeline of what’s happening:

  • Technology Services Helpdesk will be moving to room 401 on March 10th.
  • Room 401 will not be available for reservations or Zoom conferencing until Fall term 2020 while that room is our temporary Helpdesk (a Zoom-ready room is still available on the 3rd floor).
  • Construction of the second floor will begin on Monday, March 23- the first day of spring break.
  • The second floor (including the ITC computer lab) will be unavailable over spring term and most of the summer.
  • Construction is scheduled to be completed near the end of August 2020.

Please be sure to let us know if there is any way we can help while the construction is underway. Here are a few helpful tips:

  • Get your quiet library time during the later afternoons, evenings, and weekends when the construction crews will not be working.
  • Noise-cancelling headphones are available to check out from the circulation desk.
  • We’ll be moving study tables to other floors so there will still be plenty of places to study.
  • Can’t find something? Ask us! We’re happy to help, or to retrieve items for you.

Wondering how the library will be arranged once the construction and move are complete? Here’s a visualization!

WHAT'S IN THE MUDD
LIBRARY?
4TH FLOOR:
Book collections, room 401,
Kruse Room, silent study
3RD FLOOR:
Book collections, Mudd Gallery,
quiet study
2ND FLOOR:
Technology Services Helpdesk
& Center for Academic Success
Government document collections,
computer lab
1ST FLOOR:
Library Services
Research help, circulation desk,
makerspace, music score &
media collections, group study
LEVEL B:
University Archives
LEVEL A:
Periodical collections,
group study

Thank you to our many friends from all over campus who worked hard for years to make this project happen!

Winter Break and Special Hours

Mudd Library building in the snow with text that reads Happy Holidays from your friend at the Mudd

As winter break draws to a close, we’re approaching the time when the Mudd Library will be closed for a little break. Before then, be sure to stop by to check out some books, DVDs, scores, games, etc. If you’re faculty, now is a great time to drop off your materials for course reserve before the start of term rush!

Special upcoming hours are as follows:

  • Regular winter break hours of Monday-Friday 8 am to 4:30 pm (closed Saturday and Sunday) will continue through Tuesday, December 24th.
  • We’ll be closed from December 25th through January 1st.
  • We’ll be back and ready to help you get ready for winter term on Thursday, January 2nd and Friday, January 3rd from 8 am to 4:30 pm.
  • Closed Saturday & Sunday, January 4th and 5th
  • Resume regular academic year hours on Monday, January 6th

If you plan on spending the end of December getting ready for the term, there’s still lots the library can help you with- even when it’s closed!

  • Streaming media databases: Find documentaries, instructional videos, movies, news clips, operas, theatre performances, and much more from our varied collection of streaming video resources. Our streaming audio resources include a wide variety of music, theatre audio, and more. Many of these resources include permalinks to individual titles and the ability to make clips to use in courses, and most can be accessed off campus with a proxy login.
  • OneSearch and Article databases: Find full text articles by searching in OneSearch and in many of our databases.
  • ArtStor Image Database: Collect images for your courses and projects in ArtStor.
  • Course reserve forms: We have PDF forms of our course reserve cards available that you can fill out at home and print out (or save as and print out later). Find an article in one of our databases? Use this form to simply enter some information, and we’ll add your reading and fill out the card.
  • RefWorks citation manager: Don’t have access to a printer? Collect and organize resources in RefWorks that you can easily locate once we’re open again.

We hope everyone has a safe and happy winter break! Happy holidays from your friends in the Mudd!

Fall Term Citation Clinics!

Get help from a reference librarian to figure out those tricky academic citations!

This term, we’ll be holding two citation clinics! The first will take place on Tuesday, November 12, and the second on Monday, November 18– both from 7 pm to 9 pm on the first floor of the Mudd Library.

Drop by with your citation questions! A reference librarian will be waiting with citation manuals in hand to help you out!

The Seeley G. Mudd Library and the Center for Academic Success present Citation Clinics: Tuesday, Nov 12 & Monday, Nov 18th from 7 pm to 9 pm. Fix up those citations with help from a reference librarian!

Celebrating 150 Years with the Federal Depository Library Program

Text that reads, "Celebrating 150 years, Federal Depository Library Program." Includes yellow lines coming from the C as well as the FDLP symbol, which is a blue crest with a white outline of an eagle with a red book in its wing.

This year the Seeley G. Mudd Library celebrates Lawrence University’s 150th year with the Federal Library Depository Program! Our affiliation with FDLP is by far the longest among all universities and colleges in Wisconsin. Our collections of Congressional records and government documents include historical treasures unique among all FDLP libraries in the state.

We invite everyone in the Lawrence community to help us celebrate this milestone!

Tuesday, November 5 at 3 p.m. outside the Lincoln Reading Room on the first floor of the Mudd Library.

Festivities will include:

  • Presentation of an honorary plaque by Anthony Smith, Chief, Projects and Systems of the Government Publications Office in Washington, D.C.
  • Opening exhibit featuring beautiful highlights from the collection
  • Brief remarks on the significance and scholarly uses of the collections by Beth Harper (Regional Coordinator, FDLP), Arnold Shober (Professor of Government, Lawrence University), and Jill Thomas (Director of Technical Services, Mudd Library).

Cake and coffee will be served!

Alumni Librarians: Jessica Hronchek ’05

Image from Hope College

Editor’s note: We invited Lawrence alumni who have gone into library work to share with us what they do and how they got there.  Here’s another in a series.

During my time at Lawrence, I chose a double degree in Vocal Performance and Art History that sent me bouncing between both sides of College Avenue on a daily basis, the Mudd Library frequently serving as a midway landing spot for late-night study sessions for art history exams and a place to pick up needed scores, song translations, and research books. I didn’t work in the library but had moments that cemented it as a space and resource that was incredibly valuable to me. For example, a music theory summer research assistantship required me to browse through dozens of CDs in the collection looking for excerpts, and I spent a semester tracking down historic newspaper clippings in a dark corner on the microform reader for Dr. Alexis Boylan. I still remember when Dr. Michael Orr mentioned in a paper advising meeting, “So, there’s this tool called Jstor that you might find helpful…” that sent me down a rabbit hole of hours of keyword experimentation.

As I moved through my fourth out of five years, I contemplated graduate school in art history and decided that a museum internship would be helpful for figuring out my next steps. As I was looking for opportunities I noticed one at the Newberry Library in Chicago that I almost bypassed, but a very wise Dr. Boylan advised me to “leave no stone unturned” if it intrigued me. This was the internship that ended up working out. Stepping into that beautiful architectural space with its amazing historic collections would be enough to sell anyone on the career path of librarianship, but I found I also enjoyed my projects working in the photoduplication department, which involved photographing really interesting historic sources and digitizing print records. My supervisors saw my interest and encouraged me to think more seriously about library school. As I started to explore what library school looked like, I realized that librarianship would allow me to take my arts disciplinary interests and apply them to the field, which sold me on the career path. During my final year at Lawrence Colette Brautigam hired me in the Visual Resources Center at Wriston, and I was able to do more of this interesting work in image management that was beginning to tip towards the digital, both photographing and mounting slides for teaching, but also scanning and cataloging them to convert to electronic form.

The grad school search resulted in me attending Indiana University Bloomington where I pursued both my Masters in Library Science and a Masters in Art History. After bouncing between a number of on-campus library jobs, I landed a paid internship at DePauw University in their Visual Resource Center, which both funded my graduate work and provided amazing professional opportunities. My supervisor and other librarian colleagues were incredibly generous in the opportunities they gave me, allowing me to partner in creative projects, teach, and present at professional conferences so that I could network with the wider field of library professionals. This job also taught me what I was not; it was primarily an image cataloging and digitization job, and I learned over the course of three years that I needed something more hands-on with students. 

When I entered the job market, I looked for academic positions that would involve teaching, eventually landing the Research and Instruction position at Hope College that I have held for the last 10 years. I began as the humanities librarian but had the chance to pivot to the visual and performing arts after three years, again allowing me to apply my disciplinary passions to my work. It is wonderful working in a liberal arts environment, with students who are there to learn to be learners. My day-to-day work centers on classroom information literacy instruction, one-on-one research meetings with students and faculty, just in time support through our Research Help Desk, creation of digital research support tools, and collection development projects. My personal research interests center on how deeper knowledge of arts-specific research approaches can help libraries be more flexible supporters of creative scholarship. I also appreciate getting out of the library to connect with faculty and students and learn more about their interests. Participating in broader campus committees and projects over the years has allowed me to think more strategically about how libraries contribute to student learning. I also love not knowing what fascinating topic I’ll get to research on any given day. As Lawrence springboarded my journey as a life-long learner, it’s a privilege being in a field where I learn new things each and every day.

By Jessica Hronchek, Class of 2005

Tips & Tricks for New-Look OneSearch

You may have noticed that our library search, OneSearch, recently got a spiffy new look. In addition to a new user interface (UI) this new look brought with it some nice new features. Our systems librarian, Craig Thomas, who manages the OneSearch system among others, has put together some brief, informative videos to help you get around the new UI:

Additionally, be sure to sign in to your library account and check out these new features:

  • Old E-Shelf and Queries are now grouped together as Favorites, which is visualized as a pushpin icon. E-Shelf was previously a star icon.
  • My Library Card (Menu > card icon) gives access to your library account.
    • All your saved records and searches have migrated from old E-Shelf & Queries to My Favorites.
    • All your loans, requests, etc. have migrated from old My Account to My Library Card.
    • You’ll note that the old folders metaphor from E-Shelf has been dropped in favor of the term “labels.” But no worries: labels work the same way folders did.

Any questions? Be sure to ask our reference librarians for help! Comments about the new UI? Let us know what you think!

New-look Library OneSearch goes live Sunday, 9/15!

We’re pleased to announce that Library OneSearch will have a new look as the school year begins! The new look will go live Sunday, September 15, 2019.

OneSearch’s current interface is four years old this fall (that’s about 100 in internet years) and, based on user research, Ex Libris (our system vendor) has made some refinements to the product that will improve your library research experience.

Functionality remains much the same: you’ll still be able to search the Library’s catalog PLUS hundreds of thousands of articles, images, etc. at the same time, link to full-text when it’s available, see what you have checked out, renew your Library materials, and much, much more. It just looks a little different.

The official debut isn’t till Sunday, but you can have a sneak peek right now by visiting the new-look link:

Link to the New-look Library OneSearch

Be sure to sign in and check out My Favorites (pushpin icon) and My Library Card (Menu > card icon). All your saved records and searches have migrated from old E-Shelf & Queries to My Favorites. All your loans, requests, etc. have migrated from old My Account to My Library Card. (You’ll note that the old folders metaphor from e-Shelf has been dropped in favor of “labels.” But no worries: labels work the same way folders did.)

As always, let us know if you have questions about OneSearch (or other library-related things): Visit our Help page to find your favorite way of reaching us! We’re here to help.

And happy researching!