Category: Mudd Gallery

“A Group of Completely Ordinary Objects”

Madeira Seaman’s solo show “A Group of Completely Ordinary Objects” opens today, May 3rd, in the Mudd Gallery. For the show Seaman created surreal and wonderful sculptures using reworked old toys. When you enter the gallery, or as Seaman calls it “the Playroom”, you are immediately welcomed by a message written by the artist in crayon inviting you to play with all of the toys you see. Seaman writes that they used toys as their sculptural medium because they saw them as a way to explore human behaviors and relationships.

Madeira Seaman’s solo show “A Group of Completely Ordinary Objects” in the Mudd Gallery

We are incredibly excited to have the idiosyncratic work of Madeira Seaman on display in the Mudd. There will be a reception for the show on May 14th before the show closes on the 16th.  Be sure to spend some time playing with Seaman’s toys before then.

Madeira Seaman’s solo show “A Group of Completely Ordinary Objects” in the Mudd Gallery

In the Mudd Gallery: Wonder and Resonance

Wonder and Resonance is a student-curated exhibit on view in the Mudd Gallery until Monday, March 12th. Using selections from Lawrence’s Anthropology and Archaeology collection, Manuel Ferreira crafted a show which explores the cultural meanings behind various artifacts. Ferreira encourages the viewer to experience the wonder and resonance of these cultural objects writing, “Wonder is the power of an object to grab the attention of a viewer, to convey a sense of enchantment and charisma. Resonance is the power of an object to go beyond itself, to convey the complex and dynamic cultural, historical, and personal forces that created it.”

Mudd Gallery - “The Story Behind the Artifacts” a solo show by Manuel Ferreira

Unlike a traditional museum exhibition, which would likely separate artifacts by time period, culture, and geography, Ferreira includes objects which cross all these boundaries. Walking through you’ll see an Aztec death whistle which dates back to the 12th century a few feet from Chinese ivory. The rich and diverse selection of the exhibit encourages the viewer to consider the consistent power objects have throughout cultures and time.

Mudd Gallery - “The Story Behind the Artifacts” a solo show by Manuel Ferreira

More than just present the viewer with a beautiful variety of objects, Ferreira pushes us to consider what goes into building a collection asking among other things: how did Lawrence come in possession of these objects? Why are they displayed the way they are and how does that affect my experience?  The result is an affecting and intimate experience with objects you otherwise are unlikely to have.

Mudd Gallery - “The Story Behind the Artifacts” a solo show by Manuel Ferreira

We at the Mudd are incredibly excited to house this exhibit and hope you all have a chance to see it before it closes Monday, March 12.

 

 

 

Mudd Gallery Exhibit: Future Humour

 

Future Humour runs until November 20.

We love the Mudd Gallery! Having an art gallery in the library is a beautiful partnership, and one that truly embodies the essence of a liberal arts education.

Future Humour features digital photography captured in New York City and Appleton.

Supporting our students is an incredibly significant component of our mission, so it makes sense for us to offer space that allows burgeoning student artists the opportunity to curate, organize, and host their own gallery openings and exhibits.

It’s also a great resource for students working hard in the library, slogging away at their academic work. The gallery allows a meaningful, fulfilling, thought-provoking avenue through which to relax, unwind, and shift or gain perspective.

The Mudd Gallery’s latest exhibit is Future Humor by Yifan Zhang.

The artist shares color photography captured in New York City and in Appleton, creating a vibrant and interesting opportunity to compare and contrast these locations.

Zhang states, “Humour is elegant innuendo. Future Humour represents unforeseen conditions. I will let the images speak for themselves.”

The Mudd Gallery is located on the 3rd floor of the Seeley G. Mudd Library.

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In the Mudd Gallery: HOLGAVISION

HOLGAVISION: New Holga Photographs

Mudd Gallery, 3rd Floor Mudd Library

From the exhibit artists: “Come and see what we have spent countless hours in the dark room working on! All photographs are in black and white; they are all taken with a 20 dollar Holga camera!”

Introducing:

  • Julia Adams
  • 
Eryn Blagg
  • 
Rose Questel
  • 
Nick Felan
  • Lizzy Garcia Creighton
  • Emily Hirn
  • Katie Kumbalek
  • 
Linh Le
  • Ricardo Rivera
  • 
Ben Tran
  • 
Ines Valencia Graul

Exhibit duration has recently been extended, so be sure to stop by soon to see this great collection of student photographs!

Lux Reaches 300,000 Downloads!

People all over the world have accessed honors projects, issues of The Lawrentian, and convocations in the six years since Lux was implemented through the library.

We have now reached 300,000 downloads!

What is this Lux? Lux is the Lawrence University institutional repository, digital home to over 4000 scholarly and creative works of our students, faculty, and staff, as well as select historical documents.

If you are looking for interesting stories from student newspapers or alumni magazines, check Lux! You will find a rich and fascinating history.

Want to peruse recent honors projects? Lux is the place for you.

Interested in reading a Harrison Award paper? Studio Art senior exhibition artwork? Look in Lux. You will find these things and many more.

We hope you enjoy and are enriched by what you find in Lux! Let us know what you think.

In the Mudd Gallery: A Fine Specimen

Currently on display in the Mudd Gallery,  A Fine Specimen, a show by Lawrence University student and artist scientist Lexi Ames. This exhibit features documents, illustrations, and bird skins. The origins of this fascinating assemblage are described in Ames’ exhibition description:

The Lawrence University Vertebrate Collection is a rarely seen archive of natural history, spanning over 200 years and housing some 300 birds. In the Fall of 2016, senior biology/studio art major Lexi Ames began learning the traditional art of specimen skin preparation under the tutelage of Jodi Sedlock, Associate Professor of Biology, and has since added skins of birds collected on campus, as well as digitizing and cataloguing the antique collection.

A Fine Specimen will remain on exhibit through April 2, 2017.

Update: The exhibit will now remain in the Mudd Gallery through April 4, 2017.

Using Your Library Wisely

The library offers so many resources and services, it can be hard to keep track of all the ways in which we can help you succeed at Lawrence.

Below you’ll find a handy list of just a few ideas for optimizing your experience in the Mudd. How many have you employed?

Lots of seating for lots of studying.
  • Grab a study buddy and a rolling whiteboard to parse out those tricky formulas.
  • Head for the quiet solitude of the fourth floor and hide out in the stacks to read.
  • Contact a reference librarian for research assistance or make a research appointment: visit the desk, call, email, or text!
  • Watch a movie for class or relaxation in one of our five viewing rooms.

    Books and art and standing desks!
  • Browse the fiction and graphic novels on the third floor during a study break.
  • Wheel one of our standing desks to your favorite spot to focus.
  • Lounge on one of the comfy couches in the Milwaukee-Downer Room (1st floor) or in the Roger Dale Kruse Room (4th floor) while doing your class reading.
  • Reserve a group study room on either the 2nd or 3rd floor by signing your name on the clipboard outside the door. Invite your friends for an intensive study session.
  • Practice your PowerPoint presentation in the group study room on the 2nd floor.
  • Check out the art in the Mudd Gallery on the 3rd floor during a study break.
  • Cozy up to read or nap in one of our beanbag chairs! There are three spread out across the upper floors.
  • Browse the free book shelf on the 2nd floor. You can find some great music there as well!
  • Catch up on domestic or international current events with a newspaper.
  • Hide away for some quiet study among the bound periodicals on level A.
  • Visit the Circulation Desk to check out a locker for your research materials. Or check out the Wii for the weekend!
  • Gather some friends for a game break: everything from Candyland to Catan can be found on the 2nd floor.
  • Pop into the Archives on Level B one afternoon and visit with Erin Dix, our friendly and informative archivist. Find out the answers to your burning questions about the history of Lawrence and Milwaukee-Downer.

Are there any other ideas that you would add to this list? How do you use the Mudd? We’d love to hear from you!

Regardless of how you use the Mudd, we look forward to seeing you soon.

The beautiful and serene Lincoln Reading Room.

Mudd Gallery and More Art at Lawrence

It’s an exciting time for art at Lawrence, this past Friday two student run shows had their openings. First there was the Junior Art Walk featuring the work of Alison Smith, Noah Gunther, Molly Nye, Ridley Tankersley, Lexi Ames and Michael Hubbard. Our very own Mudd Gallery housed the work of Gunther and Nye until the show’s closing. The studio art junior show will soon open in the Mudd Gallery.

Just off campus The Rabbit Gallery, a student run non-profit pop up space, opened after months of fundraising and organizing by the student board. The theme of this year’s show is “Reconstructing/Deconstructing Identity” giving space for many different artists’ voices and forms of expression including, drawings, paintings, prints, photographs, video works, and sculpture. If you missed the opening you still have the chance to check out  this beautiful show, which will be up at 215 E. College Ave. until finals week begins, opened Wednesday to Friday 4:30 pm to 7, Saturday 10 am to 7 pm, and Sunday 10 am to 4 pm.

Another highly anticipated show happening on Lawrence’s campus is the Senior Show,  exhibiting the capstone projects of graduating studio art majors, opens in the Wriston Gallery on May 27th. Support the hard work of our students and faculty and go see these shows before it’s too late!

In the Mudd Gallery: Selections from the Estampas de la Revolución Mexicana Portfolio

Here at the Mudd we are very excited for the exhibition currently hanging in the Mudd Gallery, “Selections from the Estampas de la Revolución Mexicana Portfolio.” The exhibit, which is on view until March 11th, is a part of a partnership between Lawrence, the Appleton Public Library, Casa Hispana and the History Museum at the Castle. For more information on the exhibit check out this profile of the show from the Lawrence University News.

If you are interested in further exploring the work of the artists, Taller de Gráfica Popular (The People’s Graphic Workshop) — of Mexico City also known as the TGP, there many resources at the library which can help you do so. There are several books covering  the work of the TGP available for loan including, El Taller de Gráfica Popular : block prints and lithographs by artists of the TGP from the Archer M. Huntington Art Gallery , Revolution on paper : Mexican prints 1910-1960, and Mexico and modern printmaking : a revolution in the graphic arts, 1920 to 1950. As always our reference librarians are also happy to help with any and all of your research needs.

 

Mudd Gallery: Liam Hoy

Currently on display in the Mudd Gallery through October 13 is “Graduation” by senior studio art and environmental science major, Liam Hoy.  Hoy’s ideas for the exhibition were influenced by the beginning of his final year in undergrad, and the uncertainty of the future post-graduation (thus the reason for the title of the show). The exhibit is comprised of original ceramic sculpture works from 2015. It features three large ceramic sculptures suspended on wooden spider legs, and a small crowd of porcelain figures. While trying to determine how to best represent the excitement and nervousness prompted by his senior year and the future, Hoy was inspired by spiders- “they seem scary at first, but if you stop to appreciate them, they do good things.” The crowd of small, curious people represent graduates, and the gallery walls are painted black to contrast with the white glazed ceramics and porcelain figures.

Be sure to stop by the Gallery on the third floor and spend some time with this wonderfully unique exhibit!