LU Insider

Communications

Category: Communications

Grants office to host training sessions

The grants office would like to invite faculty and staff to these upcoming training opportunities:

  1. Intro to Grants @ Lawrence: Whether you’re a grants newbie or seasoned pro, register for this eat-and-learn session where we’ll discuss how internal and external grants work at Lawrence and how the Corporate, Foundation, and Sponsored Research Office can help you accomplish your goals. Join us in Kraemer Room at the Warch Campus Center for a lunch session Friday, Oct. 21, noon–1 p.m. (reading period). Space is limited! Please RSVP to lissette.jimenez@lawrence.edu by Monday, Oct. 17. Let us know of any dietary restrictions while registering.
  2. Introduction to the Funding Information Network: Come and get your hands on this powerful funder database, hosted at the Mudd Library! We’ll teach you tricks on how to identify potential grant funders, plus fellowship and scholarship opportunities. Space is limited in the ITC, so please email lissette.jimenez@lawrence.edu to reserve a seat for either Thursday, Oct. 20, 10-11 a.m. or Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017, 10-11 a.m.

LU Alert test Oct. 11

The annual test of the LU Alert system is scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 11 between 11 a.m. and noon. At that time, you will be receiving telephone calls, email messages and, if you have provided a cellphone number, text messages confirming the test. Please let your emergency contact know that he or she will be receiving a phone message as well.

This system is one of several Lawrence will use to communicate in the event of an emergency. It provides Lawrence with an enhanced ability to communicate quickly to large numbers of students, faculty, staff and emergency contacts using multiple communication channels: email, office phones, cellphones and text messages.

  • Of the delivery options, email and text messaging have been the quickest and most reliable methods.
  • The system’s ability to deliver messages to office phones is limited by the capabilities of our telephone system. While we have improved our ability to receive office phone calls, faculty and staff should not expect to receive an emergency message immediately via office phone.
  • The delivery of messages via cellphones is faster, but may also be limited by the capacity of some network providers. If you want to be notified of a campus emergency via cellphone, please verify that your cell number is listed on Voyager.
  • If you would like to be contacted via cellphone or text message, you may provide your cellphone number to Human Resources. When your cell number has been entered into the LU Alert system, a confirmation text message will be sent to your phone asking you to verify that you want to receive emergency text messages. Please opt in.

As members of the Lawrence community, we all have a responsibility to ensure effective communication in an emergency. Thank you for your support.

LU Alert test on Oct. 11

The annual test of the LU Alert system is scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 11 between 11 a.m. and noon. At that time, you will be receiving telephone calls, email messages and, if you have provided a cellphone number, text messages confirming the test.

This system is one of several Lawrence will use to communicate in the event of an emergency. It provides Lawrence with an enhanced ability to communicate quickly to large numbers of students, faculty, staff and emergency contacts using multiple communication channels—email, office phones, cellphones and text messaging.

  • Of the delivery options, email and text messaging have been the quickest and most reliable methods.
  • The delivery of messages via cellphones is faster, but may also be limited by the capacity of some network providers. If you want to be notified of a campus emergency via cellphone, please verify that your cell number is listed on Voyager. When your cell number has been entered into the LU Alert system, a confirmation text message will be sent to your phone asking you to verify that you want to receive emergency text messages. Please opt in.

Community conversations on safety and policing

The Lawrence Office of Diversity and Inclusion has partnered with the Appleton Police Department to hold community conversations regarding safety and policing throughout the academic year. The first dialogue will take place Friday, Oct. 21 from 8:30 a.m. until noon in the Warch Campus Center’s Nathan Marsh Pusey Room.

This is a collaborative effort to address existing concerns related to public safety, increase Lawrence students’ sense of belonging and avoid the tragedies that have occurred in communities across our country.

These dialogues will be facilitated, small-group discussions, followed by a large-group debriefing. The purpose will be to help all involved understand how students, police and other citizens are experiencing our community in regard to safety in order to enhance trust among these groups. It will also serve as a basis to develop strategies to increase safety in Appleton.

Please register by Monday, Oct. 17 for the first event by contacting Michelle Lasecki-Jahnke in the Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

Reminder: Upcoming diversity and inclusion listening sessions

Join Kimberly Barrett, vice president for diversity and inclusion and associate dean of the faculty, for one of several listening sessions. If you have concerns about diversity issues or ideas for how we can make Lawrence more inclusive, come to Steitz Hall, Room 202, on one of the dates below.

Each session will begin with brief opening remarks followed by an opportunity to share your ideas or concerns with others in attendance. Light refreshments will be served.

Students:
Oct. 4: 5–6:30 p.m.
Oct. 6: 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m.

Staff:
Oct. 11: 4:30–6 p.m.
Oct. 13: 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m.

Faculty:
Oct. 18: 5–6:30 p.m.
Oct. 20: 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m.

Diversity and inclusion listening sessions

Join Kimberly Barrett, vice president for diversity and inclusion and associate dean of the faculty, for one of several listening sessions. If you have concerns about diversity issues or ideas for how we can make Lawrence more inclusive, come to Steitz Hall, Room 202, on one of the dates below.

Each session will begin with brief opening remarks followed by an opportunity to share your ideas or concerns with others in attendance. Light refreshments will be served.

Students:
Oct. 4: 5–6:30 p.m.
Oct. 6: 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m.

Staff:
Oct. 11: 4:30–6 p.m.
Oct. 13: 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m.

Faculty:
Oct. 18: 5–6:30 p.m.
Oct. 20: 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m.

 

 

What about those spiders?

You may have heard that brown recluse spiders were discovered in the Facilities Services building in early August. These spiders are not native to Wisconsin, and they can deliver a nasty bite that should not be treated lightly. This was so unusual that local media (the Appleton Post Crescent and Green Bay TV stations) all reported the story.

To put everyone’s mind at ease, here’s the current situation:

  • When the spiders were first seen, LU worked with a pest control company to trap and then confirm that these were, in fact, brown recluse spiders.
  • The building was treated and additional traps were set.
  • As a precaution, staff, faculty and summer residents were notified and traps were set in all campus buildings.
  • The Facilities Services building was treated a second time to ensure that the problem was addressed.
  • No other campus buildings were affected, and no other brown recluse spiders have been confirmed on campus.

Since most of us have never seen a brown recluse spider, descriptions can be found on bulletin boards around campus. If you think you’ve seen a brown recluse spider, leave it alone and contact Facility Services at x6602.

What have you been missing?

Did you know Marcia Bjornerud has an article in The New Yorker? Or that Peter Glick has an article in Psychology Today? Or that Ken Anselment was quoted in The Washington Post?

You would know these things if you received eClips, a twice-monthly email report that lists and links to stories about Lawrence in the news, Lawrence students and alumni in the news and important articles about higher education.

Send an email to Rick Peterson asking to be placed on the mailing list. Then you, too, will know when your colleagues make national news.

Creating a more inclusive Lawrence—A welcome letter from Kimberly Barrett

Dear Lawrence faculty, students and staff,

I am writing to introduce myself, welcome you to a new academic year and begin a conversation about how we will work together to create a more inclusive Lawrence. I am extremely excited to be engaged in the work of fostering diversity and inclusion at this time, both in our country and at Lawrence.

The past year was a turbulent one that exposed the lingering pain of some while causing new anguish for others. But, as is the case in many periods of disruption, we have the opportunity to come together with new awareness to create a stronger institution and community. As author and activist bell hooks once wrote, “We cannot despair when there is conflict. Our solidarity must be affirmed by shared belief in a spirit of intellectual openness that celebrates diversity, welcomes dissent and rejoices in collective dedication to the truth.”

The evidence based on research is clear: Diversity improves the curriculum, pedagogy and co-curricular programs. Taking an inclusive approach to our work in higher education benefits everyone. It increases the cognitive complexity of students’ thinking, helping them to approach the tasks of living an engaged life both critically and with compassion. It helps us teach all students more effectively, better achieving the desired learning outcomes. And finally, it strengthens our democracy by helping create and expand an educated citizenry, including those historically underserved by higher education, who are capable of contributing fully to our shared political and economic success.

In President Burstein’s recent letter about the new academic year, he urged us to create a new path together that welcomes and supports us all and fosters civil discourse. I am developing a framework to facilitate creation of this new path, as well as a theme for our work. The framework is tactical, while the theme conveys the philosophy behind the work. Initial activities related to the framework will build upon the many critical strategies people across campus implemented prior to my arrival. I am grateful to those who have been and continue to be committed to and engaged in this important work at Lawrence. Their work laid a strong foundation upon which to build. Ultimately, conversations with faculty, students and staff over the next few months will determine specific strategies and priorities for the framework.

In order to institutionalize inclusion, the framework will focus on developing and supporting three areas:

  • Strengthening relationships, both within and between various groups on campus. This includes relationships between supervisors and employees, students and faculty members, and Lawrence and Appleton, as well as among and within various cultural affiliation groups.
  • Capacity-building—facilitating programs to ensure all members of our community have the skills, knowledge and resources they need to take an equity-minded approach to their work.
  • Accountability. This will focus on assessment across the organization (institutional, departmental and individual) in order to track and celebrate progress while identifying areas still in need of improvement and additional support.

Finally, in this time when there appears to be so much animosity, mutual hostility and hate, how can we, as our university’s motto urges, bring more light? To me, love is the light. So my theme for our diversity work will be, “Loving Large at Lawrence.” It refers to ideas related to loving learning, loving ourselves and loving community.

Loving learning is about the predisposition Lawrentians have to enthusiastically seek out opportunities to encounter and create new knowledge while bringing all of who they are to the educational enterprise. It also speaks to our understanding that optimal intellectual development occurs when significant challenge is accompanied by sufficient academic and emotional support. Loving ourselves is about becoming strong self-advocates and working to find harmony between the demands of rigorous, engaged liberal learning and self-care. It’s also about accepting ourselves so we can do the same for others. Loving community is based on the idea of Ubuntu, commonly translated, “I am because you are.” It is about acknowledging and supporting our interdependence as we strive to create a just, equitable and inclusive learning community.

So I hope you will join me in working to make sure we are indeed, “Loving Large at Lawrence.” As we embark on this journey together, keep in mind what celebrated scholar Noam Chomsky once said: “Optimism is a strategy for making a better future. Because unless you believe that the future can be better, you are unlikely to step up and take responsibility for making it so.” I look forward to getting to know you and welcome invitations from departments or organizations to discuss strategies for achieving a more inclusive Lawrence.

Wishing you much success in the coming academic year!

Kimberly Barrett
Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion and Associate Dean of the Faculty
Sampson House
920-832-7451
kimberly.a.barrett@lawrence.edu

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