Tag: David McGlynn

Professor David McGlynn’s Memoir Honored by the Wisconsin Library Association

For the second time this year, Lawrence University Associate Professor of English David McGlynn has been honored for his writing.

David-McGlynn_weblog
David McGlynn

His memoir, “A Door in the Ocean,” has been recognized by the Wisconsin Library Association’s Literary Awards Committee with its 2013 Outstanding Achievement Award. Earlier this year, the book was cited by the Council for Wisconsin Writers with its 2012 Kenneth Kingery/August Derleth Nonfiction Book Award.

The WLA’s Literary Awards Committee annually reviews some 200 books by Wisconsin authors published during the previous calendar year and chooses 10 or less to be recognized as outstanding. The selections are based on both literary merit and quality of production, including editing, printing and publishing.

“A Door in the Ocean” traces McGlynn’s journey from competitive swimming and family tragedy through radical evangelicalism and adult life.

This is the second time McGlynn has been honored by the WLA. His first book, “The End of the Straight and Narrow,” received the WLA’s Outstanding Achievement Award in 2008.  That book, a collection of nine short stories examining aspects of religious faith, also earned the 2008 Utah Book Award.

Most recently, McGlynn wrote the chapter “Leviathan,” the story of a triple homicide that devastates a high school swim team, for the just-published book “True Crime, Real Life Stories of Abduction, Addiction, Obsession, Murder, Grave-Robbing and More.”

He also has written a number of essays and short stories for a variety of publications, including Men’s Health, Huffington Post and The Literary Review.

A Lawrence faculty member since 2006, McGlynn was presented Lawrence’s 2009 Award for Excellence in Creative Activity. He earned his bachelor’s degree in English and philosophy from the University of California, Irvine and master and doctorate degrees from the University of Utah.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.

Professor David McGlynn Delivers Fox Cities Book Festival Address

David McGlynn

Lawrence University Associate Professor of English David McGlynn delivers the talk “From Essay to Memoir: The Conversion of a Door in the Ocean” Wednesday, April 24 at 7 p.m. at Thomas A. Lyons Fine Books, 124 W. Wisconsin Ave., Suite 140, Neenah, as part of the 2013  Fox Cities Book Festival.  Lawrence is one of the co-sponsors of the book festival, now in its sixth year.

Last month McGlynn was named recipient of the Council for Wisconsin Writers’ Kenneth Kingery/August Derleth Nonfiction Book Award for “A Door in the Ocean,” which traces McGlynn’s journey from competitive swimming and family tragedy through radical evangelicalism and adult life.

He also is the author of the 2008 book “The End of the Straight and Narrow,” a collection of nine short stories that examines the inner lives, passions and desires of the zealous and the ways religious faith is both the compass for navigating daily life and the force that makes ordinary life impossible.  His fiction and creative nonfiction works also have appeared in numerous literary journals, including Alaska Quarterly Review, Image, and Shenandoah.

In 2009, the Council for Wisconsin Writers recognized McGlynn with its annual Kay W. Levin Short Nonfiction Award for his essay “Hydrophobia,” which appeared in the Missouri Review.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2013 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.

Lawrence Welcomes Authors for Fox Cities Book Festival

Lawrence University will host visits by three authors and a documentary film screening in conjunction with the 6th annual Fox Cities Book Festival.  All events are free and open to the public. Lawrence is one of the sponsors of the book festival.

Lisa Genova

Writer and neuroscientist Lisa Genova, author of the New York Times’ bestsellers “Love Anthony,” “Still Alice” and “Left Neglected” speaks Friday, April 19 at 6:30 p.m. in Harper Hall. Genova, who writes “about people living with neurological diseases and conditions that are feared, ignored, or misunderstood,” has appeared on Dr. Oz and CNN and was featured in the Emmy Award-winning documentary film about Alzheimer’s, “To Not Fade Away.”

Humorist Michael Perry, author of the memoirs “Population 485: Meeting Your Neighbors One Siren at a Time,” “Truck: A Love Story” and “Coop: A Year of Poultry, Pigs and Parenting,” appears Saturday, April 20 at 12 noon in the Warch Campus Center.

Michael Perry

Perry, who grew up on a small dairy farm and today makes his home in rural Wisconsin, has written for The New York Times Magazine as well as Esquire, Outside and Backpacker magazines and is a contributing editor to Men’s Health.

Jennifer Cockrall-King

Award-winning Canadian food journalist Jennifer Cockrall-King discusses her book “Food and the City: Urban Agriculture and the New Food Revolution” Monday, April 22 at 7 p.m. in Thomas Steitz Hall of Science Room 102.

Cockrall-King examines alternative food systems in cities around the globe that are shortening their food chains, growing food within their city limits and taking their “food security” into their own hands Monday, April 22 at 7 p.m. in Thomas Steitz Hall of Science Room 102. Her appearance is supported by Lawrence’s Spoerl Lecture in Science and Society.

The film “Chasing Ice,” a documentary by National Geographic photographer James Balog will be shown Tuesday, April 16 at 7 p.m. in the Warch Campus Center cinema. The film follows Balog’s journey across the Arctic documenting melting glaciers over a three-year period. A discussion will be held following the screening.

David McGlynn

Lawrence Associate Professor of English David McGlynn delivers the talk “From Essay to Memoir: The Conversion of a Door in the Ocean” Wednesday, April 24 at 7 p.m. at Thomas A. Lyons Fine Books, 124 W. Wisconsin Ave., Suite 140, Neenah.

Last month McGlynn was named recipient of the Council for Wisconsin Writers’ Kenneth Kingery/August Derleth Nonfiction Book Award for “A Door in the Ocean,” which traces McGlynn’s journey from competitive swimming and family tragedy through radical evangelicalism and adult life.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2013 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.

English Professor David McGlynn Honored by Council for Wisconsin Writers with Nonfiction Book Award

Associate Professor of English David McGlynn

Lawrence University Associate Professor of English David McGlynn has been named the recipient of the Council for Wisconsin Writers’ 2012 Kenneth Kingery/August Derleth Nonfiction Book Award for his memoir “A Door in the Ocean.”

The book, published by Counterpoint Press, traces McGlynn’s journey from competitive swimming and family tragedy through radical evangelicalism and adult life.

McGlynn will be recognized and read from his memoir Saturday, May 11 at the CWW’s annual awards banquet at the Wisconsin Club in Milwaukee. One of eight literary category winners, McGlynn will receive a $500 prize and a week-long residency at Shake Rag Alley, an artist’s colony/retreat in Mineral Point.

The CWW award is the second for McGlynn. He was the 2009 recipient of the CWW’s Kay W. Levin Short Nonfiction Award for his essay “Hydrophobia,” which appeared in the Missouri Review.

A member of the Lawrence faculty since 2006, McGlynn received the 2008 Utah Book Award for his first book, “The End of the Straight and Narrow,” a collection of nine short stories that examines the inner lives, passions and desires of the zealous and the ways religious faith is both the compass for navigating daily life and the force that makes ordinary life impossible.

McGlynn, recipient of Lawrence’s Award for Excellence in Creative Activity in 2009, earned a bachelor’s degree in English and philosophy from the University of California, Irvine and master and doctorate degrees from the University of Utah.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2013 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.

Lawrence Hosting Five Events During Third Annual Fox Cities Book Festival

Lawrence University, co-sponsor of the annual Fox Cities Book Festival, will host five events during the third annual celebration that runs Sunday, April 11 through Sunday, April 18. More than 60 presentations by 48 authors, including two Lawrence faculty members, are planned throughout the Fox Cities during the eight-day festival.

David McGlynn, assistant professor of English at Lawrence and author of the 2008 short story collection “The End of the Straight and Narrow,” will participate in the panel presentation “How to Get Published” Saturday, April 17 at 1 p.m. in the Appleton Public Library.

Helen Boyd, lecturer in gender studies at Lawrence, discusses her two books, “My Husband Betty” and “She’s Not the Man I Married,” Monday, April 12 at 7:30 p.m. at Harmony Cafe in downtown Appleton.

Award-winning writer Jane Hamilton, author of “The Book of Ruth,” which won the PEN/Hemingway Award for First Fiction and “A Map of the World,” a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, presents “The Journey from ‘Domestic Fiction’ to Comedy” Friday, April 16 at 8 p.m. in Stansbury Theatre.

Other book festival events being held on campus include:
• “Aama’s Journey” by Broughton Coburn, Tuesday, April 13 at 7 p.m. in the Warch Campus Center cinema.

• “Principles of Reading, Principles of Writing,” by Bishop Robert Morneau of the Green Bay diocese, Friday, April 16 at 6 p.m. in Stansbury Theatre.

•. “Logomaniacs,” a theatric performance by students from the Renaissance School of the Arts, Saturday, April 17 at 12:30 p.m. in the Warch Campus Center cinema.

• “The Story of Edgar Sawtelle” by Wisconsin native David Wroblewski, Saturday, April 17 at 5 p.m. in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel.

All of the above events are free and open to the public.

Lawrence University Author Receives Best Fiction Award

David McGlynn, assistant professor of English at Lawrence University, was one of five authors recognized Oct. 21 by the Utah Center for the Book during ceremonies at the Salt Lake City Library.

David_McGlynn_Weblog.jpgMcGlynn was awarded the best fiction title for his 2008 book “The End of the Straight and Narrow,” a collection of nine short stories that examines the inner lives, passions and desires of the zealous and the ways religious faith is both the compass for navigating daily life and the force that makes ordinary life impossible.

In addition to fiction, authors were honored in the categories of nonfiction, poetry, children’s literature and young-adult novel as part of the 10th annual Utah Humanities Council Book Festival. The awards recognize excellence in writing that carries a Utah setting or theme. Winners are announced each fall for books published the previous year.

At its June 2009 commencement ceremonies, Lawrence honored McGlynn with its Award for Excellence in Creative Activity, which recognizes outstanding creative work. A member of the Lawrence faculty since 2006, McGlynn earned his Ph.D. in English literature and creative writing from the University of Utah.

Four Lawrence University Faculty Honored at 160th Commencement

APPLETON, WIS. — Lawrence University recognized four members of its faculty Sunday, June 14 for teaching excellence, scholarship and creative activity during the college’s 160th commencement.

Michael Orr, professor of art history, received Lawrence’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, which recognizes outstanding performance in the teaching process, including the quest to ensure students reach their full development as individuals, human beings and future leaders of society. Michael-Orr_web.jpg

A specialist in medieval art and illuminated manuscripts, Orr joined the Lawrence faculty in 1989. He previously received Lawrence’s Young Teacher Award (1992) and the Freshman Studies Teaching Prize (2006). He is one of only eight faculty members presented both the Excellence in Teaching and Young Teacher awards in the program’s 34-year history.

Orr has served as an exhibition consultant for the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu, Calif., and been awarded research grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the British Academy. Earlier this year, he was named one of 42 American Council on Education Fellows nationally. The program prepares promising senior faculty for responsible positions in college and university administration. Orr will spend the 2009-10 academic year working with the president and senior officers at Macalester College.

President Jill Beck cited Orr’s excellence as a lecturer in presenting his award.

“Students describe your class presentations as ‘amazing, funny, interesting, efficient, and fantastic,'” said Beck “You are thought of as a person with high standards for both student work and your own performance. Your willingness to help each student and your powerful devotion to teaching are sources of great respect.”

Orr earned a bachelor’s degree at the University of London and master and doctorate degrees at Cornell University.

Bruce Pourciau, professor of mathematics, received the Award for Excellence in Scholarship, which honors a faculty member who has demonstrated sustained scholarly excellence for a number of years and whose work exemplifies the ideals of the teacher-scholar. In 2000, he was presented Lawrence’s Excellence in Teaching Award.

Bruce-Pourciau_90_web.jpgA member of the faculty for 33 years, Pourciau has distinguished himself as a scholar with interests spanning the areas of pure mathematics, the history of science and the philosophy of mathematics. He has earned national and international recognition for his analyses of Sir Isaac Newton’s seminal work “The Principia.”

In presenting the award, Provost David Burrows praised Pourciau as person “whose precise and sophisticated thinking brings clarity to the most complex problems and situations.

“Your thoughtful and stimulating scholarly contributions have been an important part of the intellectual life of Lawrence,” said Burrows. “Your concern for the accurate use of language is a hallmark of your scholarship, as well as a source of frank commentary on the writings of others. The breadth and depth of your work are outstanding and establish you as a person of great intellectual achievement.”

Pourciau graduated from Brown University with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and earned his Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego.

David McGlynn, assistant professor of English, received the Award for Excellence in Creative Activity. Established in 2006, the award recognizes outstanding creative work for advancing Lawrence’s mission. David-McGlynn_web.jpg

McGlynn is the author of the 2008 book “The End of the Straight and Narrow,” a collection of nine short stories that examines the inner lives, passions and desires of the zealous and the ways religious faith is both the compass for navigating daily life and the force that makes ordinary life impossible. His fiction and creative nonfiction works also have appeared in numerous literary journals, including Alaska Quarterly Review, Image, and Shenandoah.

In May, the Council for Wisconsin Writers recognized McGlynn with its annual Kay W. Levin Short Nonfiction Award for his essay “Hydrophobia,” which appeared in the Missouri Review.

His scholarship includes the literary analysis of ideas of other authors, George Eliot and Frank Norris among them, the context in which they express their ideas and the connections between their writings and those of others.

“Your outstanding accomplishments in the areas of fiction, non-fiction creative writing and scholarship mark you as a person of exceptional ability,” Beck said of McGlynn. “Your imagination, sense of empathy and mastery of the craft of writing enrich the lives of all who read your work. You are not only a wonderful creative writer but are also an excellent literary scholar.”

McGlynn joined the Lawrence faculty in 2006 after earning a bachelor’s degree in English and philosophy from the University of California, Irvine. He also earned master and doctorate degrees from the University of Utah.

Andrew Mast, assistant professor of music and director of bands, received Lawrence’s Young Teacher Award in recognition of demonstrated excellence in the classroom and the promise of continued growth.

Andy-Mast_web.jpg In addition to conducting the Lawrence Wind Ensemble and the Symphonic Band, Mast teaches courses in band history, conducting, music education and the Freshman Studies program. Under this direction, the Wind Ensemble was recognized this spring by DownBeat magazine in its annual student music awards competition as the nation’s best in the classical group division, which encompasses chamber ensembles, bands and orchestras from around the country.

He is a frequent guest conductor and has led honor bands and festivals throughout the Midwest, as well as the Pilzen Conservatory in the Czech Republic. He co-founded and serves as president of the Vincent Persichetti Society, an organization dedicated to the work of the prolific 20th-century American composer.

“Your passion, enthusiasm and friendly approach have made you a very successful teacher and a valued member of the Lawrence community,” Burrows said in presenting Mast his award. “Your students hold you in high regard both as a teacher and conductor. Many students in your ensembles describe their experience as transformative, both musically and personally.”

Mast joined the conservatory faculty in 2004. He earned bachelor and doctorate degrees from the University of Iowa and also holds a master’s degree from the University of Minnesota.