Tag: literary awards

Historian Jerald Podair named national semifinalist for PEN America literary award

The story behind the building of Dodger Stadium written by Lawrence University historian Jerald Podair has been named one of 10 semifinalists for a 2018 PEN/ESPN Award for Literary Sports Writing.

Historian Jerald Podair
Jerald Podair

In “City of Dreams: Dodger Stadium and the Birth of Modern Los Angeles” (2017, Princeton University Press), Podair explores one of the earliest owner-city new ballpark negotiations and the subsequent economic and cultural impact. He wrote the book to provide a window into the complex choices cities face as they seek to balance the values of entertainment and culture against those of fiscal responsibility, of private gain against public good.

The PEN America awards honors writers and translators whose exceptional literary works were published in 2017. Categories include fiction, nonfiction, poetry, biography, essays, science writing, sports writing and translation. The winner in the sports-writing category receives a $5,000 prize.

Finalists in each category will be announced in January with winners celebrated at the 2018 PEN America Literary Awards Ceremony Feb. 20 at New York University’s Skirball Center.

“I’m not planning on any victory speeches, but as they say at the Oscars, it’s nice to be nominated,” said Podair, Robert S. French Professor of American Studies and professor of history.

Other semifinalists include “The Cubs Way: The Zen of Building the Best Team in Baseball and Breaking the Curse” by Tom Verducci, “Sting Like a Bee: Muhammad Ali vs. the United States of America, 1966–1971” by Leigh Montville and “Iron Ambition: My Life with Cus D’Amato” by Mike Tyson & Larry “Ratso” Sloman.

For more than 90 years, PEN America has united writers to celebrate creative expression and defend the liberties that make it possible to create literature, convey information and ideas and to make it possible for everyone to access the views, ideas and literatures of others.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Professor David McGlynn’s Memoir Honored by the Wisconsin Library Association

For the second time this year, Lawrence University Associate Professor of English David McGlynn has been honored for his writing.

David-McGlynn_weblog
David McGlynn

His memoir, “A Door in the Ocean,” has been recognized by the Wisconsin Library Association’s Literary Awards Committee with its 2013 Outstanding Achievement Award. Earlier this year, the book was cited by the Council for Wisconsin Writers with its 2012 Kenneth Kingery/August Derleth Nonfiction Book Award.

The WLA’s Literary Awards Committee annually reviews some 200 books by Wisconsin authors published during the previous calendar year and chooses 10 or less to be recognized as outstanding. The selections are based on both literary merit and quality of production, including editing, printing and publishing.

“A Door in the Ocean” traces McGlynn’s journey from competitive swimming and family tragedy through radical evangelicalism and adult life.

This is the second time McGlynn has been honored by the WLA. His first book, “The End of the Straight and Narrow,” received the WLA’s Outstanding Achievement Award in 2008.  That book, a collection of nine short stories examining aspects of religious faith, also earned the 2008 Utah Book Award.

Most recently, McGlynn wrote the chapter “Leviathan,” the story of a triple homicide that devastates a high school swim team, for the just-published book “True Crime, Real Life Stories of Abduction, Addiction, Obsession, Murder, Grave-Robbing and More.”

He also has written a number of essays and short stories for a variety of publications, including Men’s Health, Huffington Post and The Literary Review.

A Lawrence faculty member since 2006, McGlynn was presented Lawrence’s 2009 Award for Excellence in Creative Activity. He earned his bachelor’s degree in English and philosophy from the University of California, Irvine and master and doctorate degrees from the University of Utah.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries. Follow Lawrence on Facebook.