Tag: financial aid

Work study program connects Lawrentians with local nonprofits

Johanna Kopecky '21 sits at the front desk of the History Museum at the Castle in downtown Appleton.
Johanna Kopecky ’21 works at the History Museum at the Castle through a federal work study program.

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

Being connected to the Fox Cities community while also earning the all-important paycheck is a win-win for Johanna Kopecky ’21.

The junior from Appleton and a part-time employee of the History Museum at the Castle is one of 13 Lawrence University students working for area nonprofits through a Federal Work Study program directed by the school’s Financial Aid office.

The program aims to increase student involvement with the community by allowing students who qualify for Federal Work Study in their financial aid packages to apply for a job with participating local nonprofit organizations. Students who hold positions at nonprofits through the program are provided with essential work experience in an intimate community setting while the nonprofits receive financial assistance in paying the students’ wages.

Kopecky began her job at the History Museum through the program at the start of her freshman year. Working at the front desk, she handles admissions, gift shop sales and various other projects as needed. She believes this job opportunity has strengthened her already firm ties with her community.

“Working in the museum has really connected me with the local businesses on College Avenue because sometimes we all interact,” she says. “I’ve gotten to know the people who run these things. It definitely has a strong sense of community and I feel very involved in the downtown Appleton enterprise.”

For more on financial aid at Lawrence, see here.

Since applying through the program two years ago, Kopecky recognizes its positive influence on the community. She also appreciates what is perhaps the most rewarding aspect of the program — the ability for students to make a difference outside of the Lawrence campus.

“The benefit I see comes in the small businesses downtown — that they get more work, but we get the opportunity to have some income and become involved with the community,” she says. “It just seems ideal that everything we do isn’t always on the Lawrence campus, that we can work with the community rather than just with ourselves.”

The program stems from a mandate in the 1992 Higher Education Act, which states that 5 percent of a university’s work study funds must be allocated to community service. Lawrence’s subsequent work study program went into effect in the 1993-94 academic year. Today, there are 13 students aiding 12 different participating nonprofits.

“The purpose is to get students working but also help the community at large,” says Lawrence financial aid counselor Dan Erickson, pointing out how the program fosters mutually beneficial relationships. “On our end, it helps us build better relationships with different organizations around the area.”

From a community perspective, participating Fox Cities nonprofits gain hardworking employees who contribute to their efforts and aid the local economy.

“Through the program, we have a committed employee who can walk across the street to work,” says Sheila Ploekelman, business manager at the History Museum at the Castle. “As a nonprofit, we also benefit from the partnership, allowing us to offer a more competitive wage by receiving reimbursement for part of the student’s wages.”

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

The Princeton Review names Lawrence one of the country’s “best bang for your tuition buck” schools

Lawrence University has been named one of the nation’s best colleges for students seeking a superb education with great career preparation and at an affordable price by The Princeton Review.

Book cover: Colleges that Bay you BackLawrence was profiled in the education services company’s just-published 2018 edition of its annual guide “Colleges That Pay You Back: The 200 Schools That Give You the Best Bang for Your Tuition Buck.” The guide lists colleges alphabetically, not ranked 1-to-200.

This is the fourth year in a row Lawrence has been included in the “Colleges That Pay You Back” guide.

“I love that Lawrence has been included in this book yet again,” said Ken Anselment, dean of admisssions and financial aid, “because it underscores the lifetime of benefits that a Lawrence education provides.”

Schools chosen for the guide are based on data collected in 2016-17 from surveys of administrators at more than 650 colleges. The Princeton Review also factored in data from its surveys of students attending the schools and surveys of school alumni that PayScale.com conducted through April 2017. In all, The Princeton Review used more than 40 data points to tally return on investment (ROI) ratings of the colleges that determined its selection of the 200 schools for the book. Topics covered everything from academics, cost, and financial aid to graduation rates, student debt, alumni salaries, and job satisfaction.

In its profile, The Princeton Review editors praised Lawrence for its “stunning 9:1 student-to-faculty ratio” and “surprisingly large number of international students.” Lawrence students surveyed by the company described Lawrence as a place where “even the smallest idea is considered on a grand scale” and professors “treat us more like academic peers.”Graduating seniors lined up in cap and gown

In the career information” section of its profile, the guide gives Lawrence an exceptional ROI rating score of 89. It also cites PayScale.com figures reporting Lawrence graduates with at least a bachelor’s degree have a median starting salary of $48,900 and a median mid-career salary of $100,300.

Among the guide’s lists of special categories, Lawrence was ranked seventh out of 25 selected based on student ratings and responses to survey questions covering community service opportunities at their school, student government, sustainability efforts, and on-campus student engagement as well as the percentage of alumni from each school that reported having high job meaning.

“We salute Lawrence University and all of our Colleges That Pay You Back schools. They stand out for their outstanding academics and their affordability via generous financial aid to students with need and/or comparatively low sticker prices,” said Robert Franek, The Princeton Review’s Editor-in-Chief and lead author of the book. “Students at these colleges also have access to extraordinary career services from their freshman year on, plus a lifetime of valuable alumni support.”

Lawrence was previously included in Kiplinger’s list of “300 Best College Values for 2018.”

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

Lawrence commits to educate more high-achieving, low-income students

Lawrence University has announced ambitious new plans aimed at attracting and supporting high achieving, low- and moderate-income students as a member of the American Talent Initiative (ATI).

President Mark Burstein
President Mark Burstein

Lawrence was among the first colleges to join the ATI, a Bloomberg Philanthropies initiative led by the Aspen Institute’s College Excellence Program and Ithaka S+R.

Each participating institution is working toward the overall ATI goal of enrolling 50,000 additional talented, low- and moderate-income students by the year 2025 at colleges and universities with strong graduation rates.

“The American Talent Initiative reinforces Lawrence’s long-standing commitment to improve access for high-achieving students from families with limited means,” said Lawrence President Mark Burstein. “However, access is only a first step. Through this initiative, Lawrence will strengthen its efforts to support these students to assure that they thrive and persist to graduation.”

ATI, which has grown its membership to 86 colleges and universities in less than a year, works with institutions across the country that graduate at least 70 percent of their students in six years. Lawrence was among ATI’s initial 60 top schools, which includes Bates College, Franklin & Marshall College, Pomona College, Stanford University and Yale University. ATI recently announced 18 additional prestigious colleges have jointed the program, among them Northwestern University, Bowdoin College and Case Western Reserve University.

Lawrence has developed action plans aimed at supporting these students socially, academically and financially, from before they arrive on campus to graduation and beyond.A graduation mortar board with the message Don't let your dreams be dreams

Lawrence’s goal is to improve socioeconomic diversity through a number of strategies expected to drive enrollment among high-achieving, lower income students, including:

Identifying talented students through better recruitment of qualified high school graduates and high-achieving transfer students from community colleges and other schools

Reaching out directly to the neediest families nationwide to increase the number of Pell Grant-eligible students enrolled, the number of applications from Pell Grant-eligible students, and the number of first-generation students enrolled

Removing cost as a barrier to access by increasing need-based aid to make attendance more affordable

Retaining and graduating lower-income students at rates comparable to their higher-income peers

As part of its commitment, each member institution works with ATI to develop action plans to recruit more students from economically diverse backgrounds, ensure that admitted lower-income students enroll and engage in campus life, prioritize need-based financial aid and minimize gaps in progression and graduation rates between students of differing socio-economic backgrounds.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence welcomes student visits July 10-14 for during annual Wisconsin Private College Week

Lawrence welcomes student visits July 10-14 as part of 2017’s Wisconsin Private College Week. Lawrence is among 24 Wisconsin private, non-profit colleges and universities participating in the program designed to provide up close and personal looks at their campuses and programs.

Student leading a campus tour in the Warch Campus Center
Student-led tours of the Lawrence campus are among the activities available July 10-14 during Wisconsin Private College Week.

During the week, students are encouraged to take campus tours, meet with admission counselors and get answers to financial aid and scholarship information questions. All students who register for Private College Week will be eligible for gift cards and t-shirt giveaways. For each campus a registered student visits and completes an evaluation form, they will receive an entry for a drawing to win one of two iPads that will be awarded.

“We welcome visits to campus 51 out of 52 weeks of the year,” said Ken Anselment, dean of admissions and financial aid at Lawrence. “Wisconsin Private College week is a particularly good opportunity for students to learn more about Lawrence while also seeing some of the state’s other private colleges.”

Logo of Wisconsin indicating locations of the state's private collegesIn addition to tours and meetings with admissions counselors Monday-Thursday, Lawrence hosts its annual Summer Open House Friday, July 14 in which students can also choose academic department presentations and meet with faculty members and athletic coaches during a free lunch.

Students can schedule a Lawrence visit by registering at go.lawrence.edu/privatecollegeweek. For more information, call 920-832-6500.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Critical Issues Forum series explores “The Purpose of Higher Education”

A Head shot of Lawrence University President Mark Burstein
President Mark Burstein

Lawrence University President Mark Burstein leads a panel discussion examining the issues and challenges facing higher education as part of the university’s ongoing Critical Issues Forum series.

The program “The Purpose of Higher Education,” Friday, April 14 at 11:10 a.m. in the Thomas Steitz Hall of Science atrium, is free and open to the public.

A Head shot of Lawrence Provost David Burrows
Provost David Burrows

A Head shot of Lawrence vice president for diversity and inclusion Kimberly Barrett
Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion Kimberly Barrett

Burstein will be joined on the panel by Provost and Dean of the Faculty David Burrows and Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion Kimberly Barrett. Together they will explore the role education plays in addressing the challenges of our day and discuss university and community practices related to higher education. Audience members will be encouraged to share their perspective and opinions on the topic and their input will be used to inform future university decision making and practices.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence receives additional $5 million challenge for scholarship endowment

$5M-gift_newsblogOn the heels of successfully completing a $25 million challenge match, Lawrence University has been presented another opportunity to boost its student scholarship support.

An additional $5 million commitment by the same anonymous donor who issued the $25 million challenge a year ago, has been pledged on the condition Lawrence makes every effort to raise $10 million in matching funds by December 31, 2016.

Both the gift and the matching funds would be applied to an endowment for student scholarships that currently stands at $51.9 million.

Charlot Singleton, who serves as chair of the Board of Trustees’ development committee says this newest commitment is “significant.”

Char Singleton_newsblog“Such generosity will allow us to recommit ourselves to the founding principle of educational access for all capable students,” said Singleton, a 1967 Lawrence graduate. “We can be proud of becoming the kind of institution that places that highest priority on ensuring a Lawrence education that remains affordable to all students.”

Two weeks ago, Lawrence announced it had raised nearly $27 million in just 15 months toward the original matching gift during its “Full Speed to Full Need” initiative. The latest challenge, when successfully completed, will add another $15 million toward the ultimate goal of creating a scholarship endowment of $75 million, a total that will make Lawrence a full-need institution.

“The impact of the gifts to the Full Speed to Full Need campaign is already making a huge difference in the lives of many Lawrence students,” said Hugh Denison, a 1968 Lawrence graduate who serves as chair of the FSFN initiative. “Our ultimate goal is to see that every student has the comfort of knowing that funds will be available for them to finish their education here. While we have had spectacular success in our efforts toward that goal, there is still much work to be done. I would urge every graduate of the college to consider a gift to this vital mission.Hugh-Denison_newsblog_2

“Our success in completing this campaign will insure that Lawrence remains among the national leaders of liberal arts colleges,” Denison added.

As a full-need institution, Lawrence will be able to provide financial assistance to make up any difference between what a family can contribute and what federal and state programs provide toward the comprehensive fee.

“When we are successful with this phase of the campaign,” said Ken Anselment, dean of admissions and financial aid, “we will be able to support all Lawrentians at a level that allows them to take full advantage of the Lawrence experience.

“This campaign will put Lawrence on the short list of colleges in the country that meet the full need of all their students,” Anselment added.  

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.         

 

Fox Cities students to benefit from Lawrence scholarship initiative; matching gift campaign raises nearly $52M

Mission accomplished.

Less than 15 months after presented a challenge of matching a $25 million gift from an anonymous donor for student scholarships, Lawrence University has more than met the challenge of its “Full Speed to Full Need” initiative.

Paulson-family_newsblog
The Paulson family — Sarah, Nick ’14, Tom, Mary and Erik ’16 — have established a scholarship that will target students in their hometown of Kaukauna.

Several recent gifts pushed the match total to $26.9 million, enabling Lawrence to establish an endowment of just under $52 million that will be used exclusively for scholarships to help meet students’ demonstrated financial need.

During the Full Speed to Full Need campaign, 48 new student scholarships were created, including one by a Kaukauna family that will directly benefit local students.

The Paulson Family Scholarship, established by Tom and Mary Paulson, and their three children, Sarah, Nick and Erik, will provide the full demonstrated financial need for four years to a Kaukauna High School graduate attending Lawrence.

With a focus on high-need applicants, the scholarship will be awarded once each year to a student for a total of up to four recipients. The goal after four years is a freshman, sophomore, junior and senior will attend Lawrence as a Paulson Scholar.

In the absence of a qualified student from Kaukauna High School, the full-need scholarship will be awarded to a student from any Fox Valley high school.

“Having a local family support Fox Cities’ students is extremely moving to me,” said Lawrence President Mark Burstein. “While Lawrence attracts applicants from across the country and around the world, we are honored that every year many local residents choose Lawrence. The Paulson Family Scholarship will help us attract and support excellent students from our own back yard.”

Tom Paulson said he wanted to create the scholarship in part because “Lawrence is often overlooked due to the financial barrier.”

“Our vision is to make Lawrence accessible to motivated students who may not have the financial means for a Lawrence education,” said Paulson, who graduated from Lawrence as a non-traditional student at the age of 32 in 1993 thanks in part to the financial support he received from the college.

Paulson-Scholarship_newsblog2Beyond Tom, the Paulson family connection to Lawrence includes son Nick, a 2014 Lawrence graduate who is employed at the college as a residence hall director and campus life student organizations coordinator, and son Erik, a senior at Lawrence. Sarah is a graduate of St. Norbert College. Like their parents, Nick, Erik and Sarah are all Kaukauna High School graduates.

Tom Paulson enrolled at Lawrence on a part-time basis in 1983 through a tuition remission program set up with the Institute of Paper Chemistry, where he was employed as a research technician. When the IPC relocated from Appleton to Georgia Tech in 1989, he and his wife remained in town but were left without the tuition remission program. Students must be enrolled full time to be eligible for scholarships and grants at Lawrence.

“The creative financial assistance Lawrence brought to the table enabled me to continue my education,” said Paulson, who re-enrolled in 1989 while also working full time as lab manager at Integrated Paper Services. “My professors were extremely generous and sensitive to my needs in balancing full-time work, class schedule, lab schedules and my family life. I can’t envision this type of accommodation at any other institution.”

“While Lawrence attracts applicants from across the country and around the world, we are honored that every year many local residents choose Lawrence. The Paulson Family Scholarship will help us attract and support excellent students from our own back yard.”
— President Mark Burstein

Paulson said Lawrence’s style of education and its focus on fostering creativity were important factors in his two sons following in his footsteps.

“Building strong personal bonds with administrators, professors and peers is vital for success academically, personally and professionally,” said Paulson. “Both of my sons thrived at Lawrence and have become critical thinkers with a passion for learning.”

Since announcing the Full Speed to Full Need matching gift challenge in September 2014, Lawrence received a total of 426 gifts. The support for the scholarship initiative was as broad as it was swift, with more than half the donors (236) contributing $500 or less. The college did receive 48 gifts of $100,000 or more, including seven of $1 million or more.

“When we embarked on this $25 million challenge, we thought it would take five years to accomplish,” said Cal Husmann, vice president for alumni, development and communications. “We are amazed that we were able to raise this amount of money in 15 months. We are so honored and inspired by the response of the Lawrence community who contributed to this initiative which makes Lawrence more affordable to more students. Every gift of every size makes a difference.”

For the 2015-16 academic year, 69 percent of Lawrence’s 1,500 students are receiving need-based financial aid packages that average $35,483.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College” and Fiske’s Guide to Colleges 2016. Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Open House: Lawrence welcomes student visits July 13-18 for Wisconsin Private College Week

Lawrence University will hold a week-long “open house” for students and their families July 13-18 as part of the 20th annual Wisconsin Private College Week sponsored by the Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (WAICU).

Private_College_Week_2015_newsblogStudents are invited to take advantage of campus tours, meet with admission counselors and get answers to financial aid and scholarship information questions during Wisconsin Private College Week. Students can register to win one of two iPads as part of a WAICU-administered drawing.

“While reading about a college online or in snazzy viewbooks is a nice way to learn the facts about a school,” said Ken Anselment, Lawrence’s dean of admissions & financial aid, “there’s nothing like a campus tour to fully engage all of your senses — which goes a long way toward helping you determine how you actually feel about a college.”

Lawrence is one of 24 state institutions participating in Wisconsin Private College Week. To schedule a visit, contact the Lawrence Admissions Office, 920-832-6500.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence Student Cost Increase Smallest in 20 Years

The cost to attend Lawrence University for the 2015-16 academic year will reflect the smallest rate increase in 20 years based on the recently approved budget by the college’s Board of Trustees.

Kim-Dickson_with-students_newsblog
At 9:1, Lawrence has one of the lowest student-to-faculty ratios of any college in the country.

The comprehensive fee for the next school year will be $52,950, an increase of 2.89 percent over the current year. The increase is the smallest since a 2.84 percent change for the 1996-97 academic year and is the second smallest in more than 30 years.

This moderate increase is due in part to the Lawrence community’s efforts to decrease operating expenses by 7 percent or $3.75 million over the next three years while preserving the quality of the education.

The comprehensive fee covers tuition, room, board, student activity and sustainability fees.

“I realize the financial burden that many of our students and families face, and I take seriously any increase to the comprehensive fee,” said Burstein, who has made affordability a cornerstone of his presidency since assuming the office in July 2013. “The cost of providing a rigorous and challenging academic experience, with a student-to-faculty ratio (9:1) that is among the lowest in the country, is indeed great. As we continue to improve this institution and its offerings to students, it is imperative that we work to find ways to moderate the increasing cost of the transformative education we provide.”

A focused campaign to raise student scholarship funds was launched last September with a gift of $25 million, the largest in school history. Lawrence alumni and friends have contributed more than $18 million to match this extraordinarily generous gift. These funds will be used solely to create endowed scholarships that help meet students’ demonstrated financial need.

“Efforts to raise funds and decrease operating costs are essential to the continued health of Lawrence and to the affordability of the education we offer for future Lawrentians and their families,” Burstein said.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Matching Gifts to Lawrence University’s Scholarship Endowment Top $11M

The response to Lawrence University’s announcement of a $25 million matching gift from an anonymous donor for student scholarships has been overwhelming.

Mark Bernstein_match gift_newwblog
President Mark Burstein

Since announcing the largest gift in Lawrence history on Sept. 17, the university has received $11.4 million in matching gifts and pledges, more than 45 percent of the full match amount.

When fully matched, an additional $50 million will be added to Lawrence’s endowment earmarked exclusively for student scholarship support.

More than 260 donors have contributed to the scholarship matching effort to date with gifts ranging from $20 to $5 million. Underscoring the broad appeal of the match, more than half (54 percent) of the matching gifts have been for less than $250, with more than 100 of those for less than $100.

The scholarship endowment will be used for students with demonstrated financial need.

“It is inspiring to see this outpouring of generosity from the Lawrence community and know each dollar will support a student on this campus,” said President Mark Burstein. “The need-based scholarships generated by this endowment will greatly enhance our efforts to make a Lawrence education affordable to families across the socioeconomic spectrum. The funds raised so far will support over 75 Lawrence students forever.”

Hugh-Denison_'14_newsblog
Hugh Denison ’68

Hugh Denison, a 1968 Lawrence graduate, who has committed $1 million to the matching gift effort, said the decision he and his wife, Mary, made to do so, “is one of the best we’ve ever made. We will enjoy seeing the results of that decision for years to come.”

“While it’s perfectly appropriate to categorize this as a gift to Lawrence, we actually view it more as an investment in the next generation of students who will have the same opportunity for the world-class education that I received,” said Denison, former senior vice president, research director and portfolio manager at Heartland Advisors, Inc., a Milwaukee-based investment firm.

“My wife and I were blessed with families who could pay for our educations when we attended college, but we know that is becoming a rarity these days,” Denison added.  “We’re gratified to be able to make a difference and provide scholarship assistance to many students who might otherwise be unable to afford the great education Lawrence provides.”

Cara-Helmke_newsblog
Cara Helmke ’00

Cara Helmke, a 2000 Lawrence graduate, called Lawrence’s new scholarship endowment “the gift that keeps on giving.”

“The day I heard the news, I knew I wanted to contribute,” said Helmke, a Wisconsin native now living in Clovis, Calif., and working as a hospital billing analyst. “It feels good to give to Lawrence. It feels even better to have those dollars matched again and support students in perpetuity. With less stress over financial obligations, students can focus on academic and extracurricular activities or other life-changing experiences.

“Whether large or small, each contribution gets the university closer to the $50 million goal,” Helmke added. “Collectively, we can provide a world of opportunity for future generations of Lawrence students.”

Claudena-Skran_newsblog
Professor Claudena Skran

Support for the scholarship effort extends beyond the ranks of Lawrence alumni to include current faculty. Claudena Skran, Edwin and Ruth West Professor of Economics and Social Science and professor of government, along with her husband, David Duncombe, have made a $100,000 commitment to create a scholarship targeting international students.

“Lawrence has a great tradition of educating students from abroad and we would like this tradition to continue,” said Skran, a specialist in international relations and refugee issues who joined the Lawrence faculty in 1990. “Students who attend Lawrence form a community that extends in time beyond their four years here and in scope beyond the Appleton campus. Many international students have shared how much attending Lawrence has changed their perspective of the world and of themselves.

According to Skran, supporting the scholarship effort pays dividends to more than just the student recipients.

“Beyond the students who receive the scholarships” said Skran, “others at Lawrence – students, faculty and staff members – benefit as well if the scholarships help make our campus more globally diverse.”

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.