Two Wisconsin teachers to receive Lawrence’s annual teaching award

Joann Kekula (left) and Paula Meyer

Two teachers, one from central Wisconsin and one from the Fox Valley, are being honored as recipients of Lawrence University’s 2019 Outstanding Teaching in Wisconsin Award.

This year’s honorees are Joann Kekula, a band director at Wittenberg-Birnamwood Middle and High School, and Paula Meyer, a Spanish teacher at Appleton North High School.

Recipients are nominated by Lawrence seniors and selected on their abilities to communicate effectively, create a sense of excitement in the classroom, motivate their students to pursue academic excellence while showing a genuine concern for them in and outside the classroom. Since launching the award program in 1985, Lawrence has recognized 70 state teachers.

Kekula and Meyer will be honored at Saturday’s Baccalaureate Service in the Lawrence Memorial Chapel, part of Commencement weekend activities.

Joanne Kekula

Kekula, of Bowler, earned her Bachelor of Music Education degree from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire in 1985 and her Master’s of Music Education degree from UW-Stevens Point in 1995.

She has taught at Wittenberg-Birnamwood since 1986. She has membership in several National Honor Societies, including Alpha Kappa Lambda (music), Kappa Delta Pi (education), and Phi Kappa Phi (scholastic achievement). She also belongs to Sigma Alpha Iota, a music fraternity for women.

Kekula is on the regional executive board of the Wisconsin Education Association and is active with the National Band Association. She has been on the Wisconsin Ambassadors of Music staff since 2006 and has been a leader on student performance tours in seven European countries.

Paula Meyer

Meyer, of Appleton, earned her Bachelor of Science degree, with majors in mathematics and Spanish, from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point in 1990 and her Master’s of Arts in Education from Viterbo University in La Crosse in 1998.

She has worked in the Appleton Area School District as a Spanish teacher since 1990.

She is a member of the American Council on Teaching Foreign Languages and the Wisconsin Association for Language Teachers (WAFLT). She was named the WAFLT Teacher of the Year in 2013 and earned the WAFLT Recognition of Merit Award in 2005.

In 2014, Meyer earned National Board certification as a teacher for world languages other than English.

She’s been active in distance running and has been an advocate for people struggling with addictions.

For information on Lawrence’s Teacher Certification program, click here.

11 most productive places to hit the books before finals

Story by Awa Badiane ’21

As the term winds to an end, students here at Lawrence are entering finals week. And in order to end the term with a bang, we need to make sure we can buckle down and focus on all the assignments and tests. For that, we need a quiet place to study. To help you find your productivity nirvana, I have compiled this list of 11 of the best study spots on or near campus. You’re welcome.

1) Unused Classrooms 

This may come as a surprise to a lot of students, but students have access to classrooms that are not in use. Using your Lawrence ID, students can access lots of the classrooms throughout campus. This gives you access to white boards, larger tables, and sometimes even computers! That can be especially handy when studying with friends.  

2) Science Atrium 

Here at Lawrence, there are two building dedicated to the sciences, Youngchild and Steiz Hall. Connecting these two buildings is a spacious and bright atrium on the first floor. This space is equipped with tables, chairs and lots of natural light, perfect for studying on a sunny day.   

3) Fourth floor of the Warch Campus Center  

The Fourth Floor of the Warch Campus Center is a good choice for all different types of studiers! It is filled with tables, chairs and comfy couches. There are also two meeting rooms that are available to students, and a full computer with a printer. It doesn’t hurt that Warch is where the dining areas are located, so if you get hungry as you study or feel the need for a little snack, food is just steps away.  

4) Sabin House 

The house with the green doors across from Kohler Hall is a space for students to explore their religious identity. But this quiet meditative space doubles as an inviting space for peaceful, quiet studying. Filled with couches, rolling chairs, and a fully stocked kitchen, Sabin House is the perfect space for students who are more productive in quiet places. 

5) Hiett Lounge Rooms 

Arguably one of the best dorms on campus, Hiett Hall is filled with spacious lounge rooms (at least one on each floor). All of the lounges are fully furnished with tables and chairs. Best of all, if you’re starting to feel a bit overwhelmed, there is a fully functioning massage chair in the fourth-floor lounge.  

6) Purple Room in Trever Hall basement  

Most dorms have lounge spaces in their basements, but there is something about the lounge room in the basement of Trever Hall that is especially ideal for studying. Like most lounges, it is filled with chairs, couches, and can hold a pretty large crowd. I think it might be the purple paint in the lounge that really inspires a great study session. 

7) Science Bridge 

The two science buildings on campus are not only connected by an atrium on the first floor, there also is a bridge on the third floor that connects the buildings. With all the same charms as the first floor, there is the bonus of a great view of the Fox River from up there.  

8) Quad 

As the weather warms up, it can be nearly impossible to spend the whole day inside. The wonderful thing about an open campus with lots of green space is you don’t have too! There are many perch-worthy spots outside on campus perfect for studying. The grass on the Quad is a prime example. Just throw down a blanket and hit the books amid the sunshine. And don’t worry about not being able to use the WIFI; thanks to all the houses surrounding the Quad, you will be able to connect to the WIFI without issue. 

9) Third Floor of the Library  

The library is usually the first-place people go to get some good studying in, but what many people don’t know is each of the library’s floors have designated volume levels to fit different learners’ studying needs. As you make your way to the top floor, it gets progressively quieter, with the fourth floor designated for silent study. But if you are just looking for a quiet study spot, the third floor is your best bet. 

10) Cooper Rock  

I’ve learned, sometimes being in the same place for too long can crush your productivity. This is why I like to switch it up a bit and take my studying off campus. Copper Rock café is only a few blocks away from campus on College Avenue and can kickstart some great studying. The café is composed of two sections: the first section is the louder general area where people order and sit down to eat, while the second section is dedicated to soft conversation and quiet study.  

11) Lou’s Brews 

While a change of scenery can improve a study session, I do understand those who do not want to venture too far off campus. This cozy coffee shop right across the street from Colman Hall is an excellent spot to grab a smoothie and crack the books off campus.  

Awa Badiane ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Three for three: France teaching assignments a sign of growth for Francophone program

Cosette Bardawil ’19 is one of three Lawrence students earning teaching assignments in France.

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

Three Lawrence seniors have been awarded competitive assistant teaching positions through TAPIF (Teaching Assistant Program in France), a program that gives American citizens the opportunity to teach English in public schools in France, as well as in other Francophone locations such as French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Martinique and Réunion.

This is Lawrence’s most successful year with TAPIF yet; the highest number of applicants and a 100 percent acceptance rate. This year’s recipients — Kendra L. Van Duine ’19, Christian Lee Messier ’18 and Cosette Bardawil ’19 — will spend seven months of the next academic year in France in an immersive teaching and learning experience.

Lawrence students have been awarded assistant teaching positions through TAPIF in the past, but this year’s success shows the strides that have been made in Francophone Studies.

“Maybe five years ago we had probably one or two (applicants) and now we’re having more people apply … and everybody’s getting in,” said Eilene Hoft-March, Milwaukee-Downer College and College Endowment Association Professor of Liberal Studies and French professor. “Not everybody we nominated (in the past) got in, and I can’t remember that we had three and four people applying at one time, and now we do.”

But the success is no surprise to Hoft-March because the quality of the applicant pool is now so good.

“I think our applicants have been very serious,” she said. “When you look at the three people who’ve won, they’re very good students, they’ve applied themselves, and it’s not surprising to me at all that they’ve been placed.”

Perhaps this year’s success will herald more applicants and awardees in the future. Hoft-March sees it as a sign of growing appreciation for the academic excellence at Lawrence.

“I think that Lawrence may have risen in terms of being recognized for the quality of students we have, and I think that’s a really good thing,” she said.

For more on the French and Francophone Studies program, click here.

And the recipients are . . .

Kendra L. Van Duine ’19

Kendra L. Van Duine ’19 will be teaching in Rouen, France. Linguistic and cultural immersion through TAPIF will be valuable experience toward her goal of becoming a foreign language interpreter, translating French, Spanish, and Chinese into English. This will be her first time traveling abroad alone, and for such a long period of time. But she’s looking ahead with eagerness.

“I am very excited to have this opportunity and hope it will help me gain confidence in myself by helping other students with their foreign language skills,” Van Duine said. “I’m looking forward to getting out on my own and exploring France and the neighboring countries, as well as exploring who I am as an individual.”

Van Duine is a double-major in French and Spanish. In addition to being an RLA in Small Exec and an on-campus events coordinator for the LU People for Animal Welfare (PAW) club, she works as a research assistant in the French and Francophone Studies department.

Christian Messier ’18

Christian Messier ’18 double majored in French and music. He will be teaching at the primary school level in Tours-Orléans. For three summers he has worked at Concordia Language Villages, an immersive language summer camp, and was a French tutor at Lawrence. While assistant teaching in France, he hopes to explore other languages and expand his teaching into the realm of music.

“I’m really looking forward to working with new language learners, and hopefully I’ll be able to also teach music lessons at nearby schools,” Messier said. “I’m planning on reading a lot and traveling to various cities in France, Germany, Spain, Portugal and Italy to work on developing my abilities in those respective languages.”

Cosette Bardawil ’19

Cosette Bardawil ’19 will teach at the Académie de Rennes. The French and flute performance major is a French tutor and a LARY Buddy. She plays in the orchestra and in chamber groups, and aims to pursue music and self-exploration along with sharpening her language skills.

“My hopes for this upcoming adventure are to improve my French, help students as much as possible, explore different ways of teaching, play in some music ensembles and discover more about myself, others, and France,” Bardawil said.

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Project 562 mural returns to exterior wall of Wellness Center

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

The mural is back.

Members of Matika Wilbur’s Project 562 team returned to Lawrence University in recent days to work with Native American students to restore a mural on the side of the Buchanan Kiewit Wellness Center that was first created as part of a mid-April convocation.

Due to harsh weather in April, the Project 562 Indigenous Land Project mural was unable to properly cure during its installation. Members of LUNA (Lawrence University Native Americans) and UWGB’s Intertribal Student Organization continued to work closely with the Project 562 artistic team to repair the mural once weather conditions improved.

That work has now paid off. The large mural, featuring the faces of three generations of Native Americans, is back in place. It includes the words Indigenize Education.

The mural was not created to be a permanent installation. The wheat paste project is expected to last two to five years, depending in part on weather conditions.

Wilbur, creator and director of Project 562, has used photography and art installations to tell the story of Native American communities.

“I’m so proud of you,” Wilbur said at the time of the April convocation, addressing the more than a dozen Native American students from Lawrence and UWGB who helped create the mural. “And I’m proud of Lawrence for taking this huge step. This is a huge step to have indigenous representation on a college campus.”

Wilbur, a visual storyteller from the Swinomish and Tulalip tribes of coastal Washington, has been traveling the country — and beyond — as part of Project 562, visiting close to 900 tribal communities in all. The 562 is a reference to the number of federally recognized tribes in the United States at the time the project launched in 2012.

After her travels are done, Project 562 is expected to live on in books, exhibitions, lecture series, web sites, new curriculum and podcasts, Wilbur said.

“Matika has a magical way of giving our Native students and their allies permission to acknowledge and be proud of their own cultural traditions, families and indigenous ways, even in spaces that may have not been historically designed for us,” Brigetta Miller, an associate professor of music in the Lawrence Conservatory of Music and a member of the Stockbridge-Munsee (Mohican) Nation, said at the convocation.

“This work is more than making art for the sake of social justice,” she said. “It’s a way to truthfully show who we are. It’s a way for us to tell our own story.”

Wilbur’s April convocation address speaks to the heart of Project 562

Project 562’s creator looks to reshape narrative on Native communities

For more on LUNA student organization, click here.

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

Discovery by LU anthropology prof, students a game-changer for historic site

This graphic, showing an aerial view of the Grignon Mansion property in Kaukauna, depicts where Lawrence University Professor of Anthropology Peter Peregrine believes a Native American longhouse community once resided.
This graphic, showing an aerial view of the Grignon Mansion property in Kaukauna, depicts where Lawrence University Professor of Anthropology Peter Peregrine believes an indigenous community once resided.

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

While digging for clues into the location of a long-lost summer kitchen on a historical site in Kaukauna, Lawrence University’s Peter N. Peregrine and his students may have unearthed something much more significant — evidence of an indigenous community on that site dating back to the mid-16th century.

The anthropology professor and the students in his field methods class, using soil resistivity and other soil mapping tools as part of an archaeological survey, uncovered new details about the Grignon Mansion site that could alter the way the pioneer-era home is studied, managed and marketed in the future. The new information suggests that North Kakalin Village, a significant Native American community, was once situated on the Grignon property just northwest of where the mansion now stands. 

The testing, which began in September and continued through the fall term, gave Peregrine a new view of what lies beneath the soil, suggesting a series of Native American structures, possibly longhouses, were once located there, pre-dating by several hundred years the 1837 Grignon home that now sits on the property and is used as a tourism and educational beacon in Kaukauna.

“That raises that site into something of really national importance,” Peregrine said.

In early April, Peregrine presented a report to the Kaukauna Common Council, saying the new information adds considerable weight to the historical importance of the Grignon property. He implored the city to hire a professional director to properly explore and manage the site going forward.

Kaukauna, which owns the property, is all in. City officials have submitted a grant proposal to the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region to potentially cover a portion of the costs.

“We took Peter’s findings and said, ‘OK, we need to hire someone,’” said Allyson Watson, principal planner for the city. “We hear what he’s saying and we need to figure out a way financially to get a full-time director in place. If we don’t ever try, we’ll never know what the true potential is there.

“Really, coming off the headwinds of Peter’s message, it really reinforced to our elected officials that this site, while we’ve always known it’s important, maybe we didn’t know how critical it is, or we didn’t know how long-range that history is and the story it tells. We’re looking internally now to say, what can we do as an organization to empower that storytelling?”

Photo shows the front of the Grignon Mansion in Kaukauna.
The Grignon Mansion in Kaukauna is a historic site used to teach American history from the mid-1800s.

A history of discovery

This isn’t the first time that Peregrine and his anthropology students have dug into the dirt at Fox Valley historic or community sites and come away with important discoveries. Peregrine was named the 2016 historian of the year by the Outagamie County Historical Society after he and his students used newly purchased magnetometer tools to study the grounds of the former Outagamie County Asylum for the Chronic Insane, identifying 133 unmarked graves.

Since then, Peregrine and his students have been called upon to survey other forgotten or poorly recorded cemeteries — or suspected cemeteries — in the region.

“The asylum cemetery was our first big project,” he said. “But our biggest project was the Pioneer Cemetery up on Richmond Street and Evergreen Drive (in Grand Chute). We did the whole cemetery. That took a full term to do. We found 74 unmarked graves up there, including an entire Outagamie County pauper cemetery that didn’t seem like anyone knew was there. That was two years ago.”

That was during construction of the nearby Meijer store, which was expected to spur new development in the area. Now officials know precisely where the cemetery starts and stops.

“They wanted to make sure there weren’t bodies out in that property,” Peregrine said.

Similar requests are becoming more frequent.

“It turns out there is a huge demand for finding pioneer graves in this state,” Peregrine said. “There are a lot of them out in cornfields and stuff.”

A class all its own

The field methods class is limited to five students. Any more than that and it gets difficult to manage during archaeological excursions.

That the students get to use soil resistivity, geomagnetic and ground-penetrating radar equipment and related technology is a testament to the support the class has gotten from the university in recent years, Peregrine said. The field study portion of the program was launched about seven years ago, allowing him to dedicate more time to the archeologic work he was trained to do.

Head shot of Peter Peregrine
Peter N. Peregrine

“The university over the years has been very good to me,” Peregrine said. “They’ve gotten me equipment that very few liberal arts colleges have. These students, if they want to do archaeology, that’s something you can come out of here and get a job right away.”

Key purchases have included a magnetometer to measure soil magnetism, a soil resistivity system that allows archaeologists to measure changes in soil composition, and a ground-penetrating radar system. The purchases put the field work being done by Lawrence students on the cutting edge.

For Peregrine, the growth — and success — of the program in recent years has been particularly gratifying. The archaeologist is finally doing the digging he was hired to do more than 20 years ago. For years, other teaching demands kept him from working in the field.

“I wrote the textbook on doing this kind of field archeology,” he said. “I never got to teach it, ‘Archeological Research: A Brief Introduction.’ It’s used all over the country, but I could never use it here because I wasn’t teaching it. Now I am.”

For information on the anthropology program at Lawrence, click here.

A clearer picture at Grignon

Grignon has been the focus of late for Peregrine and his current field methods students, Emma Lipkin ’19, Joe Kortenhof ’19, Ethan Courey ’19 and William Nichols ’21, as well as Winston Klapper ’19, who is doing his Senior Experience on digital archaeology, creating non-invasive 3D modeling of the Grignon home that will be kept as a reference point for any future work on the site.

A more complete picture of the heritage museum, located along Kaukauna’s Augustine Street on the north side of the Fox River, is emerging thanks to the soil resistivity tools that have allowed Peregrine’s team to map the site based on what can be seen under the surface.

It’s allowed for the collection of soil data over a wide area, showing where human disturbances — such as digging post holes — have taken place over time. The survey stretched across much of the north and west sides of the Grignon property, even extending into an adjacent soccer field.

“Because that property hasn’t been touched, it hasn’t been plowed, nothing has happened to it since the early 1800s, there’s this beautifully preserved village underneath it,” Peregrine said.

While the city and the Grignon volunteers have long recognized and celebrated the property’s ties to the Menominee people, the new discoveries provide a greater opportunity to use the site to teach about Native American history and culture, well beyond the mid-1800s era, Peregrine said.

In his report to the city, he recommended building a Native American-inspired structure on the property.

“Native Americans are a central part of the Kaukauna/Fox Valley story as well as the Grignon family story and should be represented,” Peregrine wrote to the city.

He also suggested the city draft a land acknowledgement to be displayed on site, and develop more programming focused on Native American history.

The city initially asked Peregrine to do an archaeological investigation because there was interest by the Friends of the Grignon Mansion volunteer group in rebuilding a summer kitchen that had once been part of an out building or attachment on the Grignon home. But it was the discovery of the signs of earlier structures from the North Kakalin Village that came as a surprise, putting any plans for the kitchen rebuild on hold.

“It really opened up our eyes and the community’s eyes to this pre-American history that existed on this site — that we’ve known about but maybe not so specifically to say there was possibly a longhouse village here,” Kaukauana’s Watson said.

“So, we went from investigating 1800s history in Wisconsin — before statehood but still a European settlement — to discovering that there was rich history hundreds of years older than that that we were not aware of on this exact site. It was really exciting to see, oh my goodness, we need to pause this (project), we need to put the brakes on this because we have a whole new chapter of history that has occurred on this site that we weren’t fully aware of.”

When Peregrine went before the Kaukauna council in April, his message was all about the long-term benefits of such a history-rich site.

“I see huge potential there,” he said.

Watson is fully on board, saying she sees opportunities for a new level of education in Kaukauna and the greater Fox Cities as it relates to the Grignon property.

“I think the story of indigenous people’s displacement is every bit as important as state history and post-Colonial American history, but I think it’s one that as a country we maybe don’t do the best job telling,” she said. “I think that’s starting to change. I think there’s beginning to be more of an understanding that we need to be accountable to our history, and sometimes that means taking a hard look at things that are a less pleasant part of our history.”

Link to video of Peter N. Peregrine and Winston Klapper on the Grignon Mansion property.
Peter N. Peregrine (left) and Winston Klapper on the Grignon Mansion property in Kaukauna.

A growing collection of artifacts

The partnership between Lawrence, Kaukauna, and the Grignon volunteers who run the day-to-day operation is ongoing. Peregrine now has possession of a deep trove of archaeological materials that have been excavated from the Grignon property over a period of decades. Materials are in boxes or spread across tables in Briggs Hall, a teaching lab where archaeology and history meet in a very real way.

“Our maps show where all of the previous excavations have been done,” Peregrine said. “We’ve got all of those collections now.”

Watson acknowledged that the city and Outagamie County — ownership of the Grignon property has gone back and forth multiple times over the past decades — have not done a stellar job of archiving materials. It’s not a job most municipal governments or volunteer organizations are equipped to handle. Leaning into Lawrence’s expertise is proving to be a game-changer.

“We realized that we didn’t have the most professional archive developed for our collection,” Watson said. “For us, it’s just one of those things that would have been on a never-ending to-do list.”

Lipkin, under Peregrine’s tutelage, is now taking the lead in creating a more complete archive. She is doing the work as part of her Senior Experience, and will hand it off to another student when she graduates in June. With the collections and the archival material both massive in volume and disjointed, the project is expected to take several years to complete.

“Allowing us to work in these real-life situations that are often a mess gives us an opportunity to learn,” said Lipkin, who did similar work with the Outagamie County Historical Society in the earlier stages of her Senior Experience project. “If all of us continue to follow this path, and I certainly am planning to, we’ll be more prepared for the unpreparedness of institutions we might run into later on.”

Klapper, meanwhile, has spent much of the past year working on his 3D modeling project that will serve as a digital resource for the Grignon going forward. Using drone technology and specialty software, he is putting together a detailed picture of what the mansion looks like right now. Should anything happen to the home — perhaps damage from a storm, a tree falling on it or the natural aging process — his digital mapping of the exterior will allow for a precise rebuild.

“What my project is aiming to do is to preserve the house as it is currently, so if there are any further adjustments, then this record of the house will be kept,” Klapper said.

Tapping into the expertise of Peregrine and his students and maintaining a partnership with Lawrence has been invaluable, Kaukauna’s Watson said. It’s pro bono work, so it benefits the city without taxpayer burden, and it’s an educational opportunity for the Lawrence students.

“We are able to get guidance that we know is coming from a strong, well-respected organization like Lawrence that is really invested in lifting the credibility and offerings of our whole region,” Watson said.

“We’re a city government. We own this asset. It’s been juggled back and forth between the county and city for decades because it’s expensive to maintain a 19th-century home. But to have someone come in and help guide us professionally with real details and the nitty gritty of how you have to maintain this, that’s been very helpful.”

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

Music, food and games enjoyed during annual LUaroo festival

Story to Awa Badiane ’21

LUaroo, a spring tradition at Lawrence University, was held over the Memorial Day weekend, providing two days of live music, food and games.

With a compilation of performances from both Lawrence students and off-campus artists on Saturday and Sunday, the annual music festival had something for everyone. It’s a welcome break as spring term comes to a close and students prepare for finals.

“It’s a nice time to just chill with friends and listen to music,” Jailene Rodriguez ’21 said as she enjoyed the music under sunny skies. 

Being one week before finals, LUaroo is the perfect way to make memories with friends and blow off some steam before it’s time to buckle down and study. 

“It also helps there’s a holiday right after; great way to prep for the last week of classes,” Rodriguez said.  

Photo gallery from LUaroo

Besides being an opportunity for students to enjoy great music, LUaroo is also an amazing opportunity for student-artists to showcase their talents on stage.  

With a stage set up on the quad lawn, music started at noon both days and proceeded into the night. The lineup included, among others, Awake for Birds, Jamil & the Litterbox Kids, Daniel Green, Lala Lala, Tobi Lou, Four Fists and Oshun.

Listen to select songs by some of the featured artists on our LUaroo 2019 Spotify playlist:

“I feel like it’s a great way for musical artists on campus to promote their talents. It gives them practice for performing at bigger festivals,” said Louric Rankine ’21.

This Lawrence tradition has become something all students can look forward to, knowing they are able to have fun, let go, and enjoy some great music right here on campus.  Food, Frisbee and volleyball added to the festive spirit.

We gathered a few photos from student photographers from this year’s festival.  

Awa Badiane ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

You lost what? Our search of campus lost-and-found bins turns up 10 curious things

Story by Isabella Mariani ’21

It happens to the best of us. Sometimes Lawrentians lose track of their belongings in the bustle of student life, and you never know what will turn up in the lost-and-found bins on campus. We visited some of these lost-and-found locations and picked out 10 curious misplaced items.

Photo of gray desk organizer.

#10 | Desk organizer

Pens and pencils, paperclips and highlights all without a home. It’s pretty hard to stay organized when you lose your entire desk organizer. Someone out there could use some tips on keeping track of things.

Photo of small painting featuring what appears to be planets covered in pink smears of paint.

#9 | Art

Even Lawrence’s lost and found bins are artistic. Who would leave this behind? The artist’s identity is a mystery. . .

Photo of amber-colored bow rosin for the bow of a string instrument.

#8 | Bow rosin

A string player’s best friend. As a former cellist it’s no surprise to see this in the lost and found. Really, has anyone in history ever gone through all their rosin before losing or breaking it? Users of ChapStick might be familiar with the phenomenon.

Photo of red and blue coffee mug featuring the letter "A."

#7 | Personalized letter “A” mug

Is there an Archie or Alyssa out there looking for their favorite mug? A personal mug like this one can make that daily cup (or many cups) of hot tea or coffee even more special and integral to your day.

Photo of white sheets of paper on which lyrics are scribbled.

#6 | Handwritten lyrics

Poetic talents abound on campus. Maybe this person didn’t like their work and chose to abandon it. Who knows, this could have been the beginning of the next greatest hit.

Photo of sparkly paper St. Patrick's Day decoration adorned with shamrocks and a green top hat.

#5 | Hanging shamrock wall decoration

This is probably the remnant of someone’s St. Patrick’s Day party that was discarded after the festivities. But the party hasn’t stopped; this decoration has been coating everything else in the lost-and-found bin in glitter.

Photo of packaged pumpkin carving kit.

#4 | Pumpkin carving kit

There is surely a faceless jack-o-lantern looking for this. This pumpkin-carving kit was misplaced before it could be opened and used. Maybe it will be reclaimed in time for next Halloween.

Red rolled-up sleeping bag.

#3 | Red sleeping bag

It’s unclear if this was ever used; maybe for a spontaneous camping trip? Or a camping trip that never happened? Regardless, it’s a strange thing to lose!

Photo of gray mesh zippered bag full of shampoo and other shower needs.

#2 | A whole shower caddy

How does one lose a shower caddy? A more vexing question, how does one lose it in the Conservatory where this was found? I’d like to hear the explanation behind this one.

Photo of Lawrence draw-string bag full of paints and brushes.

#1 | A bag of acrylic paints and paintbrushes

What’s an artist without their supplies? Whether these belonged to an art student here at Lawrence or just someone with a artsy hobby, I hope they come looking for their supplies soon so they can get back to creating masterpieces.

Isabella Mariani ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office.

Longboarding, anyone? Student clubs offer chances to get outside, be active

Story by Awa Badiane ’21

It’s spring. The sun is shining. It’s time to get outdoors and get active.

For Lawrence University students, the opportunities to do so as part of organized clubs are plentiful.

Longboarding or other skateboarding? Rock climbing? Biking? Rowing? Take your pick of those and many more.

Lawrence makes it incredibly easy for students to come together and pursue their passions. To start a club on campus, all you need is an idea and two friends, and your idea can become a Lawrence official club.

As an official club on campus, you can easily pursue your interests with help from campus coordinators, and potentially funding assistance from the university.  A lot of students take advantage of how efficient it is to start something on campus, making it pretty easy for students to find something fun to do. Everything from the Baking and Cooking Club to Sailing Lawrence will give students the opportunity to try something new.

For a directory of student organizations at Lawrence, click here.

As the weather warms up, students can take advantage of the long list of activities to partake in while enjoying the great outdoors.  

The Women’s Longboarding Club is an example of just one such opportunity.  

“I love riding with other people,” said Angela Caraballo ’21. “It’s fun to see others enjoying something that I also enjoy.”  

With meetings every Sunday afternoon, the Women’s Longboarding Club gives newcomers the chance to learn longboarding and gives experienced riders a chance to connect with other Lawrentians who share their interests.

“The thrill of riding around so freely, feeling the wind rush around me, is exhilarating,” said Jailene Rodriguez ’21. 

There are plenty of other opportunities to enjoy being outside both on and off campus. With clubs such as the Rock Climbers Club and Rowing Club, students are able to explore parts of Wisconsin they may have never seen.  And there’s a Badminton Club, a Slacklining Club, a Flag Football Club, a Bike Club, among others.

Rowing Club gives students the opportunity to row in various parts of Wisconsin and compete against other schools.  

In a similar fashion, the Rock Climbers Club gives students the opportunity to go to different hiking sites or rock climbing walls throughout the Midwest.  

“My favorite thing about Rock Climbers Club is that everyone starts out on the same level and folks are welcoming to newcomers,” said Spencer Washington ’21. “You don’t need much experience but rather openness and a willingness to trust your own movement.”

That goes for almost all of the student clubs. You don’t have to have any experience to join. You can be anywhere from novice to intermediate and still be able to participate in any of the clubs offered on Lawrence’s campus.  

So, what are you waiting for? Let’s get active.

(Photos above are Rebecca Minkus ’20 and Earl Simons ’22)

Awa Badiane ’21 is a student writer in the Communications office. 

Sunshine, please: 19 things to know as you prep for Lawrence’s 2019 Commencement

The march across College Avenue to the Main Hall green, led by Faculty Marshal Kathy Privatt and President Mark Burstein (right), will again be part of Lawrence University’s Commencement. The ceremony, the 170th in the school’s history, is set for 10 a.m. on Sunday, June 9.

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

We’re just a couple of short weeks away from Lawrence University’s 2019 Commencement, the 170th in the school’s storied history.

Here are 19 things to know as you prepare for the big day.

1. Sunday morning celebration: The ceremony on the Main Hall green will begin at 10 a.m. on Sunday, June 9. All comers are welcome. The big tent that usually covers the seating area is not available this year, so it’ll be an open-air event. An alternate indoor site on campus — with limited seating — will be prepped for use should the weather be such that an outdoor ceremony is not possible. Watch for details on the Commencement page of the Lawrence website.

2. A class of brilliance: More than 330 students are expected to take that magical walk across the stage. Of those, 288 are bachelor of arts grads, 28 are bachelor of music grads and 15 are combo B.A./B.Mus. grads. Another 11 are participating in the ceremony but not receiving degrees until December.

Lee Shallat Chemel ’65

3. A speaker from stage and screen: Commencement speaker Lee Shallat Chemel ’65 will return to campus with stories to tell and wisdom to mine from an impressive career directing theater and television productions. Her deep love of theater was first sparked during her time at Milwaukee-Downer College and then Lawrence. After more than 15 years directing theater, most notably during a 10-year stint as conservatory director at South Coast Repertory in Orange County, California, she transitioned to the small screen, directing for such notable TV shows as “Family Ties,” “Murphy Brown,” “Arrested Development,” “The Bernie Mac Show,” “Gilmore Girls” and, most recently, “The Middle.”

Jordyn Pleiseis

4. From the senior class: Commencement also features words of insight and wisdom from a member of the senior class. This year’s speaker, selected by her peers, will be Jordyn Pleiseis ’19, an anthropology major from Milwaukee.

5. Saying goodbye: Honoring retiring faculty is always a significant — and often emotional — part of Commencement. The Lawrence community will be celebrating two long-serving tenured faculty as they bid adieu to the classroom, Bruce Hetzler, professor of psychology, and Kenneth Bozeman, the Shattuck Professor of Music in the Conservatory of Music’s voice department. Both have taught hundreds (maybe thousands) of Lawrentians during their celebrated four decades-plus at Lawrence.

6. Livestream available: A livestream of the ceremony will be available for viewing in real time. It’s an opportunity to watch the ceremony online if you can’t be in attendance. The livestream can be accessed at the time of the event from the Commencement page.

There will again be plenty of opportunities for photos following Commencement.

7. Smile, you’re on camera: Yes, there will be plenty of opportunities for family and friends to take photos of their graduates. There are lots of picturesque locations across campus.

8. Talent on display: Commencement weekend is a chance for seniors to show some skills, with a Senior Art Exhibition in the Wriston Art Center Galleries set for Friday (10 a.m. to 6 p.m.), Saturday (10 a.m. to 6 p.m.) and Sunday (noon to 4 p.m.) and a Commencement Concert featuring members of the Class of 2019 planned for 7:30 p.m. Friday in Memorial Chapel. Look for a reception following the concert in Shattuck Hall, Room 163.

9. Spiritual journey: On Saturday, the 11 a.m. Baccalaureate Service, a multi-faith celebration of the spiritual journey of the Class of 2019, will be held in Memorial Chapel. Assistant Professor of Religious Studies Constance Kassor will deliver the address. It’s presented for seniors and their families.

10. Picnic moves indoors: The annual Commencement weekend picnic at noon on Saturday, held on the Main Hall green in past years, has been moved inside the Warch Campus Center. Seniors and their families, as well as faculty and staff, are invited. Following the picnic, President Mark Burstein will host a reception for seniors and their families at the president’s home from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

11. In search of parking: Parking is available in the city parking ramp just west of campus. Some street parking is available around campus but availability can’t be guaranteed. Here is some helpful parking info from the City of Appleton.

12. There will be awards: As per tradition, several of Lawrence’s most cherished awards will be handed out to faculty during the Commencement ceremony — the University Award for Excellence in Teaching, Award for Excellence in Scholarship or Creative Activity, and Excellence in Teaching by an Early Career Faculty Member. The winners are not announced until Commencement.

Graduation hats are part of the Commencement day attire. Decorations are optional.

13. Dressed for success: The regalia of Commencement is among the great traditions of higher education — the gowns, the caps, the hoods, the cords all signaling a particular accomplishment along the journey of academia.

14. Music to come and go: Speaking of grand traditions, the music of the processional and the recessional will embrace this group of graduates, courtesy of the Lawrence University Graduation Band. Andrew Mast will again conduct as the band performs Crown Imperial by William Walton for the processional and Procession of the Nobles by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for the recessional.

15. Familiar and new faces: Led by President Mark Burstein, there will be familiarity in the ceremony. Kathy Privatt, the James G. and Ethel M. Barber Professor of Theatre and Drama, will again serve as faculty marshal. David C. Blowers, chair of the Board of Trustees, will offer the convocation for the second year in a row. Provost and Dean of Faculty Catherine Kodat will present the faculty awards. One notable change will come in the opening and closing words, a duty handled for many years by Howard E. Niblock. He retired last year, and that honor now falls to Linda Morgan-Clement, the Julie Esch Hurvis Dean of Spiritual and Religious Life.

The Class of 2019 displays its green flag during Welcome Week four years ago. Per tradition, each class is assigned one of four colors.

16. Class colors: Look for plenty of green to be on display during Commencement. The tradition of assigning a color — red, green, yellow, or purple — to each class at Lawrence has its roots in Milwaukee-Downer history. It was reinstated at Lawrence in 1988 and has continued since. The color of the Class of 2019 is green.

17. Conferring of degrees: That magical moment when the graduates’ names are called and they make the walk across the stage and the degrees are conferred is the heart and soul of any Commencement ceremony. Handling those duties for bachelor of music recipients will be Burstein and Dean of Conservatory Brian Pertl ’86. Handling for bachelor of arts recipients will be Burstein and Kodat.

18. A parade of another sort: A parade of graduates isn’t the only parade during the June 8-9 weekend that might get your attention. The 68th annual Flag Day Parade will march through downtown Appleton beginning at 2 p.m. Saturday. It will affect traffic in the downtown area as thousands of onlookers line the streets to watch the state’s oldest Flag Day parade. It’ll start on Oneida Street at Wisconsin Avenue, make its way to College Avenue, then proceed through the downtown, turning north at Drew Street and ending at City Park. See details here.

19. A Juneteenth celebration: Speaking of city events near campus, you may also want to note this one on your calendar. Appleton’s ninth annual Juneteenth Celebration will take place from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday in City Park, providing a possible post-Commencement destination. It also will affect parking near the campus in the afternoon hours.

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu

New studies, research put Lawrence on front lines of bee advocacy

Israel Del Toro, dressed in a protective suit, preps honeybees for the observational hive on the roof of the Warch Campus Center.
Israel Del Toro prepares to release honeybees to an observational hive on the roof of Lawrence University’s Warch Campus Center. The hive is visible from inside the Warch on the fourth floor.

Story by Ed Berthiaume / Communications

Israel Del Toro’s advocacy for bees — fun fact: there are upwards of 100 different species of bees in Appleton alone — is no secret.

The Lawrence University assistant professor of biology has been championing bees and the untold benefits they bring to our ecosystem since he arrived on campus three years ago. He launched the Appleton Pollinator Project to turn homeowners and gardeners into citizen scientists, helped install and study pollination sites across the Fox Cities, and pushed students in his biology lab and campus environmental clubs to work to improve the on-campus habitat for bees.

Now Del Toro is stepping up that advocacy to another level, working to get Lawrence designated as a bee-friendly campus via Bee City USA, an initiative of Xerces Society. There are currently 70 campuses across the country that hold the bee-friendly designation.

All expectations are that Lawrence will be No. 71, and only the second in Wisconsin.

Del Toro submitted Lawrence’s proposal in early May, spotlighting the school’s sustainability push, the efforts to eliminate invasive species that work to the detriment of bees, the planting of bee-friendly wildflowers, the ongoing research activities and the educational outreach on and off campus.

“The goal is to use the campus as this big lab to try to figure out what the best practices are for managing bee diversity in urban landscapes,” Del Toro said.

To help connect Lawrence faculty, students and staff with the wonders of honeybees, Del Toro donned a protective suit last week and released bees into an observational hive set up on the roof of the Warch Campus Center, visible from behind the safety of glass on the building’s fourth floor.

“It’ll be an active colony that we hope will last for three years,” Del Toro said.

“People can’t actually touch the bees but the hives themselves have a plexiglass window so you can look inside and see the bees doing their bee thing and building honeycomb and foraging and dancing.”

A formal unveiling of the observational hive will be held in June, complete with a bee-inspired picnic featuring foods that require bee pollination — think apple pie, blueberry treats and avocado smoothies. Stay tuned for time, date and details.

Bee science

The observational hive at Warch offers an up-close look at the honeybee, the best known of the bee species that are here, but that’s just the start of the bee-focused educational opportunities on campus.

There are 10 different bee species known to be on Main Hall green, mostly housed in the hexagon-shaped pollination box just southeast of Main Hall. But another 32 species are known to inhabit S.L.U.G. (Sustainable Lawrence University Gardens), where students actively maintain a bee-friendly space with blooming flowers, native wildflowers and the ongoing removal of invasive plants.

The hexagon-shaped pollination box is on the Main Hall green, near Youngchild Hall.
A pollination box is on the Main Hall green near Youngchild Hall, home to multiple species of bees.

Del Toro is also working with City of Appleton officials to get the city designated a Bee City. It’s all part of the efforts to educate people on the ecosystem importance of bees and the dangers that exist when we’re not being good stewards of the land.

“It reflects some of the important values of Lawrence,” Del Toro said of the bee-friendly campus and city efforts. “Lawrence has always been very progressive thinking. Sustainability is a big issue now. We want to make sure that in the time of climate change and biodiversity loss, we are a leader in setting the proper example. If all we can impact is our little 88 acres on campus, well, that’s a great starting point. We can lead by example. I think that’s a really great example of the ethos of Lawrence.”

As long as we can get past the misconceptions about bees — no, they are not looking to sting you — it’s also good for student recruitment, Del Toro said.

“I would hope something like this is drawing students who are more sustainably focused and are thinking about issues like conservation and ecology and conservation biology,” he said.

For more on Lawrence’s biology and related offerings, click here.

For more on Lawrence’s geosciences and related offerings, click here.

Hands-on learning

That sort of thinking drew in Maggie Anderson ’19 , a farm girl from northern Minnesota who came to Lawrence with an interest in biology and found the field work that was part of the Del Toro-led bee studies to her liking. She’ll graduate in June, then head to the University of Minnesota to pursue a doctorate while researching bees in prairie ecosystems.

“I didn’t necessarily come in with an intent to study bees, but it kind of became apparent soon after I got here that that was something I was really interested in,” Anderson said.





“It’s given me a lot of
really great research experience.”

Maggie Anderson ’19

What she got at Lawrence in terms of hands-on research opportunities was “really more than I expected,” she said.

That kind of scientific research doesn’t start and stop with bees, though. Ecological-focused work is happening across departments at Lawrence, from biology to natural sciences to environmental sciences, where faculty and students are working on studies in such wide-ranging but critical areas as aquatic ecosystems, endangered plants, bat conservation, soil ecology, and hydrology, to name a few.

“This is one tiny thing we do,” Del Toro said of the bees. “We’re doing a lot of cool science. What that means for our students is they get to go on this ride with us as we’re doing really cutting-edge science.”

Del Toro and his wife, Relena Ribbons, a visiting assistant professor of biology who will become a tenure-track faculty member in the fall, have been leaders in the citizen science project, an effort launched last year to build nearly 60 garden beds in back yards across the Fox Cities. The garden beds, designed to grow vegetables, are split in two, one half pollinated by insects, the other half cordoned off by mesh to keep bees and other insects out.

The homeowners keep the veggies in exchange for providing data from their gardens. Del Toro, Ribbons and their students then analyze the results as they come in.

Israel Del Toro head shot
Del Toro

“What we found from last year’s research is that bees are probably contributing to a market here in the Fox Cities that’s worth roughly $80,000 to $100,000 a year in pollination ecosystem services,” Del Toro said. “That’s based on the amount of produce that gets pollinated by bees in our back yards.”

For Anderson, the interaction with the community has been as enlightening as the work with the bees.

“It’s given me a lot of really great research experience, but also communication experience,” the senior biology and music double major said. “Working with people is a really undervalued part of science, especially in the conservation field that I want to go into. You have to work with people a lot, and you have to know how to communicate.”

Her fellow students, Anderson said, have embraced her bee research and the idea of this being a bee-friendly campus.

“In this campus environment, people really do get that,” she said. “People really do understand that we are up against a lot of environmental issues when we talk about bees in terms of habitat loss and bees just not having enough resources in an urban setting. We need to make a nice, available on-campus habitat for bees, and students and staff to my knowledge have been really, really supportive of that.”

Today (May 20) is World Bee Day. And National Pollinator Week arrives on June 17, just in time for Del Toro’s pollination-themed picnic. No better time to salute these researchers as they create the biggest buzz on campus.

Did we mention there will be pie?

Ed Berthiaume is director of public information at Lawrence University. Email: ed.c.berthiaume@lawrence.edu.