Tag: Teaching Awards

Lawrence honors two Appleton teachers as “outstanding educators”

A pair of Appleton high school teachers will be recognized Sunday, May 7 as recipients of Lawrence University’s 2017 Outstanding Teaching in Wisconsin Award.

Marlyce Reed, a history teacher at Appleton North, and Pat Schwanke, who teaches history and psychology at Appleton East, will be honored as outstanding educators.

Head shot of Marlyce Reed
Marlyce Reed

Both will receive a certificate, a citation and a monetary award from Lawrence President Mark Burstein in ceremonies at the president’s house. Their respective schools also will receive $250 for library acquisitions.

Recipients are nominated by Lawrence seniors and selected on their abilities to communicate effectively, create a sense of excitement in the classroom, motivate their students to pursue academic excellence while showing a genuine concern for them in and outside the classroom. Since launching the award program in 1985, Lawrence has recognized 66 state teachers.

Reed joined the Appleton Area School District in 1991 and has been a member of the faculty at North High School since 2006. Her teaching experience includes AP American Studies, AP U.S. history, U.S. history, history media, civics, e-school civics as well as extensive work in the Gifted & Talented field. Since 2014, she has served as a College Board reader for Advanced Placement U.S. history exams.

North honored Reed in 2011 with its Teacher of the Year award and she is a three-time recipient of the Wisconsin Center for Academically Talented Youth Excellent Educator Award.

“Ms. Reed is a teacher who takes her role as an educator with utmost seriousness and treats her students as scholars in their own right.”
— Lawrence senior Gabriel Peterson

 

She created the first International Community Problems Solving Team featuring students from North High School and Shchuchye, Russia. They worked collaboratively to address safety issues related to a Cold War chemical weapons depot near the village of Shchuchye. Reed worked with numerous Russian government officials, the U.S. State and Defense Departments, the Green Cross, Parsons Company and local Shchuchye residents to establish safety programs and protocols to promote acceptance of the weapons deconstruction plant built by the U.S. government.

Lawrence senior Gabriel Peterson, who nominated Reed for the award, described her as “a dedicated, wise and hard-working teacher.”

“Ms. Reed is a teacher who takes her role as an educator with utmost seriousness and treats her students as scholars in their own right, helping them grow academically and personally through her often-rigorous curriculum,” Peterson wrote in his nomination. “Her holistic approach to teaching also gives her students valuable skills in writing and critical thinking, preparing many for further education and giving all an expanded mindset.”

Originally from Independence, Iowa and a graduate of Wisconsin’s Wonewoc-Center High School, Reed earned a bachelor of music degree from UW-Stevens Point and a master’s degree in music from Northwestern University. She also received certification in history and broad field social studies from Lawrence.

Head shot of Pat Schwanke
Pat Schwanke ’83

Schwanke has taught at East High School since 1985 and served as the head coach of the Patriots football team for the past 26 years.

He is a member of the American Psychological Association and since 2011, has been active in the Fox Valley chapter of Voices of Men, an organization that works to end sexual assault and domestic violence. From 2012-16, Schwanke coordinated the Appleton East Tackles Cancer initiative. He was presented the Helen and Ade Dillon Award in 2015, which honors an AASD staff member “who encourages a balanced life for students through excellence in education and involvement in student activities outside of the classroom.”

“Pat cares about each of his students individually and knows how to make sure every student will succeed and reach their highest potential,” Lawrence senior Aubrey Scott wrote in her nomination of Schwanke. “He always made every topic exciting and engaging. It was in Pat’s class that I first found a love for psychology and realized that I want to teach it someday and pass on that love to others, just as he does for his students.

“I hope that I can someday leave an impact on my students like Pat did with his,” Scott added. “I think any of my classmates would agree with me that he deserves this award more than anyone.”

A native of Menasha, Schwanke graduated from Lawrence in 1983 with a bachelor’s degree in psychology/secondary education with teacher certifications in broad field social studies, economics, history, political science and psychology.

“It was in Pat’s class that I first found a love for psychology and realized that I want to teach it someday…I hope that I can someday leave an impact on my students like Pat did with his.”
— Lawrence senior Aubrey Scott

A former standout tight end on the Lawrence football team who helped the Vikings win three consecutive conference championships, Schwanke was inducted into the Lawrence Athletic Hall of Fame in 1997.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

 

 

 

Educators with Lawrence ties recognized with state teaching awards

Stacy Mallette, a 2013 Lawrence University graduate, has been recognized by the Wisconsin Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (WACTE).

A head shot of Stacy Mallette
Stacy Mallette ’13

A secondary level language arts and special education teacher at Green Bay’s Dr. Rosa Minoka-Hill School, a K-12 school that serves students with a continuum of unique learning needs, is one of the 2017 recipients of the WACTE’s Early Career Educator Award.

Corey Otis, who has been instrumental in shepherding nearly a dozen student teachers from Lawrence into the profession, has been named one of the 2017 winners of WACTE’s Pre-Service Educator Mentor Award.

Both will be honored Sunday, May 7 at the home of Lawrence University President Mark Burstein.

Otis and Mallette were selected for the awards by faculty of Lawrence’s college and conservatory teacher education program. Each Wisconsin college or university that belongs to WACTE was invited to select a recipient for each award.

The Early Career Educator Award honors outstanding educators within the first three years of their professional career. Mallette has taught at Minoka-Hill for three years.

Minoka-Hill Principal Renee Every credited Mallette for connecting with students who may never have experienced the benefit of having an adult in their school lives. While Minoka-Hill’s students are traditionally labeled “at risk,” Mallette only sees their “promise of success” according to Every.

“Stacy is caring, compassionate and an upbeat advocate for our students who not only cares about academic success, but about each one of them as a person,” said Every.

Stewart Purkey, Bee Connell Mielke Professor of Education and associate professor of education at Lawrence, called Mallette “the kind of teacher every parent would like for their children.”

“Lawrence is proud to name Stacy as its Early Career Educator this year,” said Purkey.

A head shot of teacher Corey Otis
Corey Otis

The Mentor Award recognizes an outstanding educator who has demonstrated a sustained pattern of mentoring pre-service educators for at least five years. Otis has taught English language arts teacher at Appleton East High School for 17 years.

Purkey describes Otis as a mentor in every sense of the term: advisor, guide, confidant, counselor, guru.

“Although veteran teachers sometimes forget they were once beginners and how difficult it is to learn to teach,” said Purkey, “Corey always treats budding teachers gently, with patience and good humor, care and respect, even as he holds them to the highest standards of the profession.”

Otis earned a bachelor’s degree from UW-Madison and his teaching certification from Lawrence.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.”  Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence Honoring Deerfield, Milwaukee Teachers as ‟Outstanding Educators”

Ryan Petersen, music teacher at Deerfield High School, returns to his alma mater as one of two recipients of Lawrence University’s 2015 Outstanding Teaching in Wisconsin Award.

Tim Grandy, an English teacher at Milwaukee’s Divine Savior Holy Angels High School, also will be honored as an outstanding educator.

Ryan-Petersen_newsblog
Ryan Petersen ’98

Petersen and Grandy each will receive a certificate, a citation and a monetary award Sunday, May 3 from Lawrence President Mark Burstein in ceremonies at the president’s house. Their respective schools also will receive $250 from Lawrence for library acquisitions.

Recipients are nominated by Lawrence seniors and selected on their abilities to communicate effectively, create a sense of excitement in the classroom, motivate their students to pursue academic excellence while showing a genuine concern for them in and outside the classroom.

Since launching the award program in 1985, Lawrence has recognized 64 teachers.

Petersen, a 1998 Lawrence double degree graduate (B.A. and B.S.) with majors in music education and anthropology, joined the Deerfield School District that same year as band director for grades 6-12. He directs the high school jazz, pep and marching bands, the concert and jazz bands in middle school as well as 6th grade band.

In addition to music theory and music technology courses, he teaches junior- and senior-level high school classes in anthropology and archaeology. For the past 15 years, Petersen has taken his archaeology class on field trips to Bjorklunden, Lawrence’s northern campus in Door County, for site excavation exercises.

Petersen also teaches music appreciation and archaeology classes online through the Jefferson Eastern Dane Interactive (JEDI) Distance Learning/Charter School/Online School program.

Lawrence senior Savannah Vogel, who nominated Petersen for the award, was a student of his from 6th grade through graduation.

“He always had high expectations of me which allowed me to set high goals for myself as a musician and as a student,” said Vogel. “His passion for his students is apparent in the amount of time he spends working toward their success.”

Vogel said Petersen’s degree in anthropology from Lawrence helped him introduce the discipline at her school.

“Most students at Deerfield High School had never heard of anthropology and probably wouldn’t have before college if it wasn’t for Mr. Petersen,” said Vogel. “He drew a large variety of students into these classes which resulted in anthro becoming a very popular class, despite the fact that it was one of the hardest classes offered at our school.”

“His passion for his students is apparent in the amount of time he spends working toward their success.”
— Savannah Vogel ’15

He was recognized with the Wisconsin Music Educator’s Association Outstanding Young Music Educator Award in 2004. He is also a five-time winner (2002, 2004, 2008, 2009, 2015) of Deerfield High School’s Significant Educator Award, an honor chosen by the valedictorian and salutatorian of the senior class.

A native of Silver Spring, Md., Petersen is a member of the Madison Wind Ensemble and McFarland Community Band, which he also co-directs. He has served as co-president of the Deerfield Education Association since 2007.

After graduating from Lawrence, Petersen earned a master’s degree in music education from Boston University.

Tim-Grandy_newsblog
Tim Grandy

Grandy joined the English department at DSHA in 1980. He teaches junior-and senior-level classes on major British writers, modern American women writers, major themes in literature, Shakespeare, a college composition course and advanced placement English literature.

Lawrence senior Marie Jeruc credited Grandy with inspiring her to pursue a major in English in college.

“I have never had a teacher who is so genuinely excited about the course materials,” Jeruc said of Grandy in her nomination. “He is engaging and exciting, but always genuinely passionate about English literature and extremely intelligent about the subject. Despite his reputation as a demanding teacher, he is also a wonderful man, full of enthusiasm, encouragement for his students and has the energy of three men combined.

“Mr. Grandy’s intensity definitely applied to his expectations for his students,” Jeruc added. “Most high school students dread writing analytical essays on literature, but writing for Mr. Grandy comes with even greater challenges. For as strict of a teacher he is, he does everything in his power to make sure his students learn as much as possible about literature and writing. He demands insightful commentary and eloquent writing, but also encourages creative thoughts and unique analyses.

“Despite his reputation as a demanding teacher, he is also a wonderful man, full of enthusiasm,
encouragement for his students and has the energy of three men combined.”

— Marie Jeruc

Born and raised in Milwaukee, Grandy also has served as DSHA’s yearbook advisor for much of his career. He was the recipient of a $1,000 Kohl Foundation Fellowship in 2005 and was recognized by the University of Chicago with its Outstanding Teacher Award — also through a nomination by a former student — in 2002.

He earned a bachelor’s degree in English education from UW-Milwaukee and a master’s degree in English and American literature from Marquette University.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2015 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Engaged learning, the development of multiple interests and community outreach are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Three LU Faculty Honored at Commencement for Teaching Excellence, Creative Activity

 Amid the pomp and circumstance of Lawrence University’s 165th commencement Sunday, June 15, three members of the faculty were recognized for teaching excellence and creative activity.
Tim-Spurgin_newsblog
Timothy Spurgin

Timothy Spurgin, associate professor of English and Bonnie Glidden Buchanan Professor of English Literature, received the Award for Excellence in Teaching, which recognizes outstanding performance in the teaching process, including the quest to ensure students reach their full development as individuals, human beings and future leaders of society.

A member of the faculty since 1990, Spurgin previously was recognized with Lawrence’s Young Teacher Award (1993) and the college’s Freshman Studies Teaching Award (1994). He is one of only four faculty members in the history of the awards to receive all three teaching honors.

Spurgin’s scholarly interests focus on 19th-century English literature, especially the novel and works of Charles Dickens, as well as literary criticism and theory.  His scholarship has been published in the academic journals Dickens Quarterly, Dickens Studies Annual and the Minnesota Review.

In presenting Spurgin his award, Provost and Dean of the Faculty David Burrows cited him for his teaching that extends “well beyond the confines of our classrooms.”

“You help students and faculty learn in countless ways; through individual conferences in your office, presentations at Freshman Studies symposia, discussion group sessions on new ideas about our educational mission, and private advisory sessions that help colleagues develop their own teaching abilities,” said Burrows. “Your firm but calm approach is a form of teaching that makes the entire campus a place where learning flourishes.”

Spurgin also has been a four-time recipient of Lawrence’s Babcock Award, most recently in 2009, for “giving generously of his time and energy to assist students.” After graduating Phi Beta Kappa from Carleton College, Spurgin earned his doctorate in English at the University of Virginia.

“You help students and faculty learn in countless ways…your firm but calm approach is a form of teaching that makes the entire campus a place where learning flourishes.”
           — Provost David Burrows on Timothy Spurgin

Monivs-Rico-newsblog
Monica Rico

Monica Rico, associate professor of history, received the award for Excellence in Creative Activity. Established in 2006, the award recognizes outstanding creative work for advancing Lawrence’s mission.

Rico joined the faculty in 2001 and served as the college’s Pieper Family Professor of Servant Leadership and director of engaged learning from 2010-2013.

Her scholarship focuses on gender and cultural history, especially of the American West. She is the author of the 2013 book “Nature’s Noblemen: Masculinities on the Nineteenth-century Transatlantic Frontier” (Yale University Press), which explores how British and American men performed and constructed masculinity in their encounters with the 19th-century American West and with each other.

Burrows praised Rico for her “consistent excellence and brilliance as a scholar” in presenting her the award.

“Your devotion to history and its power to understand the human condition has led you to study many other topics, notably the history of travel to Africa,” said Burrows. “You have used your knowledge to provide support for colleagues in a variety of areas. You also delved deeply into the scholarship of community-based engagement while serving as the Pieper Family Chair of Servant-Leadership. It is clear that you are a person of great intelligence and thoroughness who will continue to devote yourself to insightful scholarship for many years to come.”

In January, Rico was recognized as one of the winners of the 4th Annual Fox Cities Future 15 Young Professionals awards, which honors young business and community leaders for their efforts in work, civic and charitable causes.

She attended the University of California-Berkeley, earning a bachelor’s degree with majors in history and political science as well as a master’s and a doctoral degree.

“It is clear that you are a person of great intelligence and thoroughness who will continue to devote yourself to insightful scholarship for many years to come.”
               — Provost David Burrows on Monica Rico

Stephen-Sieck-newsblog
Stephen Sieck

Stephen Sieck, assistant professor of music and co-director of choral studies, received the Young Teacher Award in recognition of demonstrated excellence in the classroom and the promise of continued growth.

A member of the faculty since 2010, Sieck directs Lawrence’s 110-voice Viking Chorale and co-directs Cantala women’s choir and Concert Choir. His research interests include diction pedagogy and he has published articles on British composer/conductor Benjamin Britten and renowned American composer Aaron Copland.

In presenting him his award, Burrows said his success could be attributed to “a wonderful combination of passion, an insistence on high standards of achievement and care for your students.”

“Colleagues also praise your generosity and admire you for the culture of artistic accomplishment you help create,” Burrows added. “You clearly are a part of making the Lawrence University Conservatory of Music a world-class musical institution.”

In March, Sieck co-directed the Concert Choir and Cantala at the 2014 American Choral Directors Association North Central Regional Conference in Des Moines, Iowa.

“You clearly are a part of making the Lawrence University Conservatory of Music a world-class musical institution.”
               — Provost David Burrows on Stephen Sieck

Sieck, who also serves as the music director at Neenah’s First Presbyterian Church, earned a bachelor of arts degree with a major in music from the University of Chicago and a master’s and a doctoral degree in choral conducting from the University of Illinois.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence Honoring Two State Teachers as ‟Outstanding Educators”

Eric Anderson, band director at Verona Area High School, and Lynette Schultz, an English teacher at Williams Bay Jr./Sr. High School, will be honored Sunday, May 4 with Lawrence University’s 2014 Outstanding Teaching in Wisconsin Award.

Eric-Anderson_newsblog
Eric Anderson

They each will receive a certificate, a citation and a monetary award from Lawrence President Mark Burstein in ceremonies at the president’s house. Their respective schools also will receive $250 for library acquisitions.

The recipients are nominated by Lawrence seniors and selected on their abilities to communicate effectively, create a sense of excitement in the classroom, motivate their students to pursue academic excellence while showing a genuine concern for them in and outside the classroom. Since launching the award program in 1985, Lawrence has recognized 62 high school teachers.

Anderson has directed the concert band, wind ensemble and symphonic band while also teaching AP music theory at Verona High School since 2006. Additionally, he directs pep band, oversees rehearsals for school musicals and organizes tours around the country for all of the band students.

Infectiously Enthusiastic

Lawrence senior Catie DeMets called Anderson “one of my most influential mentors” in nominating him for the award.

“He brings an incredible amount of energy to each of these activities, devoting such sincere attention and enthusiasm to each student that they can’t help but feel excited, inspired, and valued,” wrote DeMets, a 2010 Verona High School graduate and environmental studies and geology major at Lawrence. “His communication skills in teaching and directing never failed to be engaging, clear, and stimulating. He constantly challenged us to pour all of our energy into the task at hand. But he didn’t force this with practice records or required lessons. We were simply motivated to do so because he was infectiously enthusiastic about music.”

A member of the National Association for Music Educators, Anderson serves as conductor/music director as well as board member of the Verona Area Concert Band and also sits on the board of directors of the UW-Madison School of Music Alumni Association.

He has been the recipient of a Will Schmid Scholarship through the Comprehensive Musicianship through Performance Workshop, which recognizes a person who has exhibited “special interest in teaching and an enthusiasm for helping other music educators.”

The University of Wisconsin honored Anderson in 2009 with a Cooperating Personnel Award for “outstanding contributions to the school of education.”

Anderson, who began his teaching career in 1999 as band director at Stoughton’s River Bluff Middle School, earned a bachelor’s degree in instrumental music education from UW– Madison and a master’s degree in education media design and technology from Full Sail University.

Lynette-Schultz_newsblog
Lynette Schultz

Schultz joined the Williams Bay English department in 2011, where she teaches English 10 and 11, AP English, college prep reading & writing and is the faculty advisor for the school’s Forensics team, creative writing club, and drama club.

She previously spent three years at Kenosha’s St. Joseph High School, two years at her alma mater, Webster High School, and two years as a Title VII/home school coordinator for the Saint Croix Ojibwe Tribe in Hertel.

In addition to her classes at St. Joseph’s, Schultz coached the Forensics team (speech and debate) and oversaw the school newspaper and yearbook.

Engaged, Challenging, Sensitive

Senior Lindsay Browne, a three-year student of Schultz’s at St. Joseph’s and a 2010 graduate of the school, said “nothing could have better prepared me more for my future life at Lawrence than Ms. Schultz’s mentorship” in her nomination letter.

“There is no doubt in my mind that Ms. Schultz is an excellent teacher,” wrote Brown, a biology and history major at Lawrence. “Engaged in the material and with the students she’s teaching…her classes are challenging because she expects her students to work hard and think deeply.  She is sensitive to her students’ learning needs as individuals; seamlessly supplementing analytical discussion and writing assignments by incorporating additional digital, creative or theatrical material into her lesson plans in order to interest and engage her students.”

Schultz earned a bachelor’s degree in English from UW-River Falls.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Lawrence Honoring Two Fox Valley Educators with State Teaching Awards

A pair of Fox Valley educators, including a 2012 Lawrence University graduate, have been named the first recipients of two new annual awards from the Wisconsin Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (WACTE).

Eli-Grover_newsblog
Eli Grover ’12

Eli Grover will receive the Early Career Educator Award. He is a second-year band and exploratory music teacher at Einstein Middle School and the Classical Charter School in the Appleton Area School District. Margaret Engman, a social studies teacher at Kaukauna High School, will receive the Pre-Service Educator Mentor Award.

The awards will be presented May 4 at the home of Lawrence University President Mark Burstein.

Grover and Engman were selected for the awards by the faculty of Lawrence’s college and conservatory teacher education program. Every college or university that belongs to WACTE was invited to select a recipient for each award.

A Passion for Music

The Early Career Educator Award honors an outstanding educator within the first three years of his/her professional career.

Grover earned a bachelor of music degree in instrumental/general music education from Lawrence in 2012 and joined the Appleton School District that same year. Lawrence cited him for his advocacy of music education both in and outside the classroom.

“Eli spreads passion for music wherever he goes,” said Stewart Purkey, associate professor of education and Bee Connell Mielke Professor of Education at Lawrence. “His students create music of all kinds in the school and community, including concert band, body percussion, Balinese Gamelan and bucket band. His advocacy for music education includes leading outreach activities at the Mile of Music Festival and The Building for Kids Children’s Museum.”

Margaret-Engman_newblog
Margaret Engman

Encouraging, Nurturing, Inspiring

The Mentor Award recognizes an outstanding educator who has demonstrated a sustained pattern of mentoring pre-service educators for at least five years. Engman joined the Kaukauna High School faculty in 1990.

In selecting her for the award, Lawrence cited Engman for her enthusiasm for the subject material, consummate teaching skills and dedication to the intellectual and emotional well being of her students.

“Without question, Margaret would be on anyone’s list of ‘best teachers,’” said Purkey. “As a methods instructor in Lawrence’s teacher education program, Margaret provides aspiring K-12 teachers with the knowledge and skills they need to become effective practitioners.  Perhaps more important, she encourages them, nurtures them, inspires them so that they leave her classroom as passionate about the art, the craft and the profession of teaching as she has been throughout her career.

“Lawrence is pleased and honored to recognize and celebrate the work of these two exceptional educators,” Purkey added.

About Lawrence University
Founded in 1847, Lawrence University uniquely integrates a college of liberal arts and sciences with a nationally recognized conservatory of music, both devoted exclusively to undergraduate education. It was selected for inclusion in the Fiske Guide to Colleges 2014 and the book “Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About College.” Individualized learning, the development of multiple interests and community engagement are central to the Lawrence experience. Lawrence draws its 1,500 students from nearly every state and more than 50 countries.

Four Faculty Honored for Excellence at Commencement

Four members of the Lawrence University faculty were recognized for teaching excellence, scholarship and creative activity Sunday, June 13 during the college’s 161st commencement.

David-Becker1_web
David Becker

David Becker, professor of music and director of orchestral studies, received Lawrence’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, which recognizes outstanding performance in the teaching process, including the quest to ensure students reach their full development as individuals, human beings and future leaders of society.

Becker returned to the Lawrence conservatory in 2005 as director of orchestral studies after serving in the same capacity for four years early in his career in the mid-1970s. In between he held teaching positions at Oberlin College, the University of Miami and UW-Madison, where he spent 21 years as director of orchestras and professor of the graduate orchestral conducting program.

In presenting Becker his award, Lawrence President Jill Beck praised his “great skill as a master teacher.”

“Your marvelous direction of the Lawrence University Symphony Orchestra, your work with student productions such as opera and your involvement in every aspect of musical performance have had a profound effect on students, faculty and staff and the countless members of the community who have been present for the inspiring music events performed under your guidance,” said Beck. “Anyone who has attended a Lawrence Symphony Orchestra performance can sense the pride of the students and the love and respect they feel for you.”

A native of Pennsylvania, Becker earned a bachelor of music degree in viola performance and music education at Ithaca College School of Music and a master of music degree in viola performance and conducting from the University of Louisville School of Music.

Jerald-Podair_web
Jerald Podair

Jerald Podair, professor of history and Robert S. French Professor of American Studies, received the Award for Excellence in Scholarship, which honors a faculty member who has demonstrated sustained scholarly excellence for a number of years and whose work exemplifies the ideals of the teacher-scholar.

A specialist on 20th-century American history and American race relations, Podair joined the Lawrence faculty in 1998 as the winner of that year’s Allan Nevins Prize, an award conferred by the Society of American Historians for the best Ph.D. dissertation in history written in the country that year.

He is the author of two books, “The Strike That Changed New York: Blacks, Whites, and the Ocean Hill-Brownsville Crisis,” which examines a bitter racial controversy in New York City and “Bayard Rustin: American Dreamer,” a widely praised biography of the civil rights activist who organized Martin Luther King’s 1963 March on Washington. Other recent projects include an essay on Rudolph Giuliani and New York’s racial politics and an introduction to a new edition of the classic book about the sinking of the Titanic, “A Night to Remember.”

“Your scholarly contributions to Lawrence have been outstanding,” said Beck in presenting Podair his award. “You have published two books while at Lawrence and are working on no less than three other books. Your work has been published in several important journals and has led to many awards and honors. If there is something more that you might be expected to do right now, I have no idea what that could be.”

His current scholarship includes a baseball-themed book on the cultural implications of the Brooklyn Dodgers move to Los Angeles, a book that looks at the United States from 1877 to the present entitled “American Conversations” and a collection of essays on the ways Americans have sought to define the concept of equality.

A native of New York City, Podair serves as a member of the Wisconsin Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission and was named a fellow of the New York Academy of History in 2009. He earned a bachelor’s degree at New York University, a law degree from Columbia University and his Ph.D. from Princeton University.

Patrice Michaels, professor of music, received the Award for Excellence in Creative Activity. Established in 2006, the award recognizes outstanding creative work for advancing Lawrence’s mission.

Patrice-Michaels_web
Patrice Michaels

An award-winning soprano, Michaels has taught vocal performance and music theatre in the Lawrence conservatory since 1994. A specialist in the works of Mozart, Michaels has performed at prestigious concert venues throughout the world, including Salzburg, Austria in 2006 for the 250th anniversary celebration of Mozart’s birth.

She is well known for her performance of “The Divas of Mozart’s Day,” a tour de force theatrical production that celebrates the divas of late 18th-century Vienna. She has released 20 commercial recordings, among them the disc “American Songs,” which included eight world premiere recordings.

“You have been a powerful force for creative activity, both through your own work and through the inspiration you have provided to others,” said Provost David Burrows in presenting Michaels her award. “Your presence has helped many students develop their own creative abilities, helped by your supportive and friendly attention.”

In a career that has taken her to opera stages around the world, Michaels also has performed for the U.S. Supreme Court and Cuban President Fidel Castro. Most recently she has remounted an original program she first developed while at the Banff Centre for the Arts. “A Song for Harmonica,” featuring a 4-foot tall bib overall-clad puppet worked by Michaels, is a program designed for elementary school students to explore the nature of inspiration through operatic excerpts and original songs.

Michaels earned a bachelor’s degree in music and theatre from Pomona College and a master of fine arts degree from the University of Minnesota.

Dominica Chang, assistant professor of French and Francophone studies, received Lawrence’s Young Teacher Award in recognition of demonstrated excellence in the classroom and the promise of continued growth.

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Dominica Chang

A member of the Lawrence faculty since 2007, Chang’s research interests include 19th-century French studies, literary history and historiography, print culture, film studies and language pedagogy.

In presenting her award, Burrows praised Chang for her “extraordinary success” in the classroom and for being a “wonderful example of the concept of individualized learning.”

“Students speak with enthusiasm about your ability to inspire everyone to learn and reach the highest levels of achievement,” said Burrows. “Your patience and warmth help students conquer their anxieties about writing and speaking and produce work of outstanding quality. Your feedback is frequent and helpful.

“Students say they strive to do well because they want to repay the trust you show in them and many give you the ultimate praise: you are the best professor they have ever had,” he added.

Chang earned a bachelor’s degree in French language and literature from UW-Madison, a master’s degree in French studies from Middlebury College and a Ph.D. in Romance languages and literatures from the University of Michigan. She also spent a year studying at the University of Paris.

Anthropologist Carla Daughtry Awarded Fulbright Fellowship

Lawrence University cultural anthropologist Carla N. Daughtry has been named a recipient of a 2010 Fulbright Senior Scholar Award.

Daughtry will spend the 2010-11 academic year at the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Alsaud Center for American Studies and Research (CASAR) at American University in Cairo, Egypt.

During her nine-month fellowship appointment, which begins in mid-August, Daughtry will teach courses on American perspectives on race, ethnicity, diaspora and globalization. She also will support student and faculty research activities through CASAR.

Carla-Daughtry_web
Carla Daughtry

“This is a wonderful opportunity to re-immerse myself in Cairo and Egyptian culture and enhance my own teaching and scholarship,” said Daughtry, who previously spent a year at American University in Cairo as an undergraduate student in the late 1980s. “My Fulbright year in Cairo will strengthen ties between Lawrence University and Egypt, where Lawrence students have enrolled for a term or year abroad at American University in Cairo. My experiences also should help deepen the richness of Arabic and Middle Eastern studies for students here at Lawrence.”

This is the second time Daughtry has been recognized by the Fulbright Scholars Program. While in graduate school at the University of Michigan, she was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship in 1992 that also took her to Egypt, where she studied Arabic at Cairo’s Center for Arabic Studies Abroad.

She also spent two years (1998-2000) in Cairo as a research fellow at American University working with displaced Sudanese refugees who fled Sudan’s civil war as part of her doctoral dissertation field work.

Daughtry , who joined the Lawrence faculty in 2000, focuses her scholarship on Middle East and North Africa cultures, transnational and urban refugee communities and ethnic and gender issues.

After earning a bachelor’s degree in international relations at Mount Holyoke College, Daughtry earned two master’s degrees — one in Middle East and North African Studies and one in cultural anthropology — and her doctorate in cultural anthropology at the University of Michigan.

Established in 1946 and sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the Fulbright Scholar Program is the federal government’s flagship program in international educational exchange. It provides grants in a variety of disciplines for teaching and research positions in more than 120 countries.